June 12, 1925

LAB

William Irvine

Labour

Mr. WILLIAM IRVINE (East Calgary):

I should like to ask the Minister of Labour if he knows whether troops have been sent to the mining area, and whether they have been sent in order to protect the men against the police of the company, or for what purpose they have been sent?

Topic:   MINERS AND STEEL WORKERS
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LIB

James Murdock (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Mr. MURDOCK:

Our understanding is that the troops were asked for by proper authority in the persons, I understand, of justices of the peace .or judges in Cape Breton, applications being made to -the Attorney General of Nova Scotia who requisitioned troops from the garrison at Halifax, and these troops left last evening for the scene of the riots. I do not know that I could give my hon. friend any further information except to assume that troops were requisitioned for the purpose of maintaining peace, order and good government in the mining area. That is the presumed purpose of the requisitioning of troops.

Topic:   MINERS AND STEEL WORKERS
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PRO

Henry Elvins Spencer

Progressive

Mr. SPENCER:

Will the Minister of

Labour tell us who will be called upon to pay the expense of the troops being sent to Cape Breton.

Topic:   MINERS AND STEEL WORKERS
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LIB

James Murdock (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Mr. MURDOCK:

My hon. friend having been in the House during the last two or three sessions will recall the change in the

law which requires that the province shall, in the case referred to, be required to pay the expense of the troops.

Topic:   MINERS AND STEEL WORKERS
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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

Am I to understand from the minister that the troops of Canada have actually gone to Cape Breton without the government being so much as notified?

Topic:   MINERS AND STEEL WORKERS
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LIB

Edward Mortimer Macdonald (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Hon. E. M. MACDONALD (Minister of National Defence):

For the information of

my hon. friend what has occurred has been that the attorney general requisitioned the district officer commanding in the province of Nova Scotia for the troops under the act which we passed last session. The district officer has communicated with the adjutant-general and has advised him to the effect that he was acting under the orders of the attorney general.

Topic:   MINERS AND STEEL WORKERS
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INQUIRY FOR RETURNS


On the Orders of the Day:


LIB

Arthur Bliss Copp (Secretary of State of Canada)

Liberal

Hon. A. B. OOPP (Secretary of State):

In reference to the remarks of my right hon. friend the leadter of the opposition (Mr. Meighen) on the orders of the day yesterday in regard to the delay in bringing down certain returns I have drawn the attention of the officials of the department in charge of this work to his remarks and I am informed (hat a large number of the returns asked for will be very voluminous and will necessitate a great deal of work. I have asked the different departments to expedite this work as rapidly as possible and I hope before the end of the session they will all be brought down. I would remind my hon. friend that four of the returns he mentioned yes.erday as not having been brought down have already been laid on the table.

Topic:   INQUIRY FOR RETURNS
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CON
LIB

Arthur Bliss Copp (Secretary of State of Canada)

Liberal

Mr. COPP:

The following returns were

tabled in the House:

Reference No. 99, Mr. McQuarrie, April 27, 1925, Re: Number of civil servants who are eligible to come under the provisions of the Civil Service Superannuation Act 1924. Presented in House of Commons May 29, 1925.

Reference No. 103, Mr. Doucet, April 27, 1925, Re: A copy of all correspondence in connection with the appointment of the new postmaster at St. Ignace, electoral district of Kent, New Brunswick. Presented in House of Commons, May 27, 1925.

Reference No. 117, Mr. Stevens. May 11, 1925, Re: Statement made out by Messrs Wilson and Wilson in October 1924 as auditors fqr Vancouver Harbour Commissions, etc. Presented in House of Commons June 11. 1925.

Reference No.120 Mr. B'ack (Halifax) May 18. 1925, Re: How much money has been expended by the National or Quebec Battlefields Commission in monuments and historic sites in Quebec. Presented in House of Commons May 28, 1925. .

Fruit Act

Topic:   INQUIRY FOR RETURNS
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FRUIT ACT AMENDMENT BILL

SENATE AMENDMENT


Hon. W. R. MOTHERWELL (Minister of Agriculture) moved the second reading of and concurrence in amendment made by the Senate to Bill No. 117 to amend the Fruit Act. He said: The provision the Senate has inserted is simply following the present practice, and although my attention was called to the fact that the official title "Horticultural Council of Canada" is not quite correct, I think it will be all right. I have no objection to accepting the amendment.


CON

Grote Stirling

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GROTE STIRLING (Yale):

I should like to repeat what I said yesterday and to state the reason why I objected to the amendment being made. It seems to me a most extraordinary thing that we should lbe consenting to an amendment in this House which actually refers to an association by a wrong title. It might result in one of two things; either the authorities concerned might ignore the body called The Horticultural Council of Canada because it does not exist or else they might consult that body, describing it by its correct name, and afterwards there might be trouble in connection with it. I suggest that the amendment 'be not concurred in. My second reason is that it is usual and the minister has in the past consulted both the Fruit Growers' Association and the Canadian Horticultural Council before bringing in such a recommendation. I do not therefore see any necessity for the minister to be formally insti'ucted to again consult that body. It might mean that it would be necessary to call into session that particular body because it really only meets once a year. It is necessary that quick action should be taken, and quick action will not be obtained if this amendment is adopted.

Topic:   FRUIT ACT AMENDMENT BILL
Subtopic:   SENATE AMENDMENT
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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. ARTHUR MEIGHEN (Leader of the Opposition):

Although I do not claim

to be as familiar with the details of these various organizations, as the hon. member for Yale (Mr. Stirling), it strikes me as a very peculiar amendment, especially coming from the upper house. That body is distinguished for the care which it takes from a legal aspect, especially in the revision of legislation. But to insert a provision such as this in a statute seems to me most extraordinary. It says, "the minister after consultation with the Horticultural Council of Canada"-something that has not the slightest legal effect. It is especially absurd if t'he hon. member for Yale is correct in the statement that there is no

[Mr. Copp.l

Horticultural Council of Canada. I think it must have slid through the Senate rather loosely, and I suggest to the minister that he should take it up again. Why should he insert into legislation the provision that the minister should consult the Horticultural Council of Canada? It would have had some meaning if it had said "with the approval of the Horticultural Council of Canada", but as it stands it is absurd. I am sure the House will agree with me in that.

Topic:   FRUIT ACT AMENDMENT BILL
Subtopic:   SENATE AMENDMENT
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LIB

William Richard Motherwell (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. MOTHERWELL:

All the six bills

that went through this House dealing with agriculture have been adopted by the Senate with this one simple amendment, and it would look a little bit pemickity on my part if I began to split hairs as to the name of the body. If we call them the Horticultural Council of Canada, they will surely come. I would not like to suggest an amendment to this amendment. Everybody knows what they are. We always consult them. The Senate has inserted in this bill an amendment which asks that we shall do what we always do. They could not ask for less if they asked anything at all, and I am ready to comply with a reasonable request of that kind, especially when I remember the bills which have been passed in this House and have been slaughtered entirely in the Senate. I feel grateful that this small amendment has been made, but now to begin to cheesepare and to say that this is not exactly the technical name, I think would not serve any useful purpose. If anybody will suggest the right name I will not object to the change. But I approve and concur in the amendment made by the Senate. If anybody thinks they will not come for this name, let them come for the other name. I have not the official name with me. Everybody in Canada will know what the Horticultural Council of Canada is. I think the official name is "Canadian Horticultural Council". Surely we are not in a hurry to finish the session when we can quibble on such differences as this.

Topic:   FRUIT ACT AMENDMENT BILL
Subtopic:   SENATE AMENDMENT
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PRO

Thomas Wakem Caldwell

Progressive

Mr. T. W. CALDWELL (Victoria and Carleton):

I am surprised that the minister

is ready to accept this amendment, because I fear it is going to get him into trouble. For instance, when it comes to amending the Root and Vegetable Act I shall insist on a consultation with the New Brunswick Potato Growers' Association before any changes are made-that is, proceeding on the principle which the minister adopts in this amendment. And when it comes to the grading of eggs and any amendments relating thereto, the egg circles of Prince Edward Island would

Fruit Act

have to be consulted before anything was done. I think it is a ridiculous and impracticable amendment.

Topic:   FRUIT ACT AMENDMENT BILL
Subtopic:   SENATE AMENDMENT
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LIB

William Richard Motherwell (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. MOTHERWELL:

It is practised

now.

Topic:   FRUIT ACT AMENDMENT BILL
Subtopic:   SENATE AMENDMENT
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PRO

Thomas Wakem Caldwell

Progressive

Mr. CALDWELL:

It may be practised.

But the minister brought down this bill to get authority to make special grades where no gradles existed. It will be an emergency measure, and that is why we passed the bill. When the crop is harvested, if there are any unusual circumstances in connection with it the minister will be able to establish grades that do not now exist under the law. Now, while there is a Canadian Horticultural Council, there is no Horticultural Council of Canada. The name is wrong, but I do not think that is a very material matter. But I believe this association meets only once a year and that the members of it are scattered all over Canada. How would the minister proceed to consult this organization if he needed something done in a hurry? Would the government pay the expenses of calling the members of the council from various sections of Canada to meet at Ottawa in order that he might consult them? Or will he wait until the emergency has passed and the necessity of getting the grades has passed, in order that he may consult them at their regular meeting? If the amendment is not accepted the Senate will surely reconsider their request in this matter. I do not want to hold the bill up, I want to see it go through; but I want it to go through in such a way that the minister will be able to take some action on it. To my mind he might better withdraw the whole thing than submit to this amendment, because it will prevent his doing anything in a case of emergency.

Topic:   FRUIT ACT AMENDMENT BILL
Subtopic:   SENATE AMENDMENT
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June 12, 1925