May 18, 1925

EXPORT OF POWER

LIB

Thomas Andrew Low (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Hon. T. A. LOW (Minister of Trade and Commerce):

I lay on the table of the

House correspondence in connection with the application of the Bridge River Power Company, dated October 5, 1920, for the right to export power for a term of twenty-five years.

Hon. GEORGE P. GRAHAM (Minister of Railways and Canals): As promised on

Friday last, I lay on the table of the House certain documents in connection with Carillon dam, copy of lease of 1908, of lease of 1911, and of lease of December, 1921, with renewals thereof and applications for renewals.

Topic:   EXPORT OF POWER
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CANADA-FINLAND TREATY OF COMMERCE

LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Immigration and Colonization)

Liberal

Hon. J. A. ROBB (Acting Minister of Finance) :

On Thursday last I promised the

leader of the opposition (Mr. Meighen) to lay on the table certain correspondence regarding the trade treaty with Finland and also a statement of imports from the Netherlands to Canada. I now do so.

Topic:   CANADA-FINLAND TREATY OF COMMERCE
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DEATH OF MR. T. H. THOMPSON, M.P.

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

It is only a fortnight

since mention was made in this House of the death at Ottawa of one of its hon. members from the province of Quebec. To-day it is our sad duty to record the loss of another hon. member, Mr. Thomas Henry Thompson, member for East Hastings in the province of Ontario.

Mr. Thompson's death occurred with tragic suddenness. Though not in the best of health, he was to all appearances hale and hearty when the House adjourned over the week end on Friday last. On Saturday morning, due, it is thought, to over-exertion, he suffered a heart strain from which he rallied' for a brief time, but within twenty-four hours he had passed away.

Mr. Thompson was in his fifty-ninth year. He was first elected a member of parliament in 1917, at which time he was returned as the Conservative member for the constituency of East Hastings. He was reelected in the general elections of 1921. Prior to his entry into federal politics he had1 taken an active part in the municipal affairs of his native township and county. He was reeve of Madoc village on more than one occasion, and for five years was member of the Hastings county council. In 1913 he was chosen warden of the county.

His business and commercial interests, especially as a manufacturer and buyer of cheese, gave Mr. Thompson a special knowledge of many branches of agriculture. For ten years he was a director of the Eastern Ontario Dairymen's Association and for three years he was president of the Madoc Agricultural Society. The knowledge thus acquired he turned to the advantage of all concerned, as occasion arose for the consideration of agricultural problems in this House. Mr. Thompson did not take much part in debate. Like the hon. member for Compton who predeceased him, he was one of those members who make their presence felt by the faithfulness of their attendance in the House but whose influence is not less great because so largely silent and unobtrusive.

Hon. members on this side will join with me in extending to my right hon. friend (Mr. Meighen) and those who sit about him, our sympathy in the loss of one who was a highly respected member of the Conservative party. May I ask, Mr. Speaker, that irrespective of party, you will convey to Mrs. Thompson and her daughters, on our behalf, expression of the sympathy felt for them in their great bereavement by all hon. members of this House.

Topic:   DEATH OF MR. T. H. THOMPSON, M.P.
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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. ARTHUR MEIGHEN (Leader of the Opposition):

It was a distressing shock to myself to hear yesterday morning by telephone of the death of one of our colleagues in this group in the House, all the more so because I had personally no intimation that Mr. Thompson suffered from any disability. His closer companions amongst us were aware that for some time he had been afflicted, as was thought in a minor way, with weakness of the heart, but unaccompanied, so far as anyone knew, with any serious apprehensions as to his life. The suddenness of it all was the greater because within a few hours before, he had mingled with his fellow-members here, apparently in the best of spirits and of health.

The Prime Minister has reviewed Mr. Thompson's association with this parliament and, as well, has made mention of those things in which he had engaged prior to his entry here. Any office of civic honour that he did not fill was not within the reach of the man. He appeared to have freely gained and very long sustained the unbounded confidence of his fellow-citizens; and if a knowledge of the affairs of a constituency, an intimate acquaintance with all its activities, close, indeed familiar, information as to each and all of those whom he represented, constitute the best attributes and qualifications for a member of parliament, Mr. Thompson would in-

Questions

deed be hard to excel. There was nothing of value to the people of his riding that he did not understand as well or better than they, and he seemed to consider it his one duty here to reflect the mind of his people on all questions of public import. Nor was there anything that his industry did not apply itself to that he felt would be of value to those whom it was his privilege to serve. He enjoyed, as well, and of us still more emphatically, the affection of his fellow-members of parliament. Modest in demeanour, as modest as his career was creditable to himself, unobtrusive on the floor of the House, but ever at hand to serve, he gained the esteem of and finally became beloved by all.

It is with very, very deep feeling indeed, that I ask that we all do join in the message which you have been kindly deputed to send to his widow and daughters.

Topic:   DEATH OF MR. T. H. THOMPSON, M.P.
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PRO

Robert Forke

Progressive

Mr. ROBERT FORKE (Brandon):

Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the members who sit in this part of the House, may I add a few words to what has been said? The death of Mr. Thompson came with startling suddenness; he had1 done his day's work and has been called home-a striking reminder to all of us of the uncertainty of human life. As has been said, Mr. Thompson was a man who took an active interest in public life and had rendered great service to his community before he came to this House. I was not intimately acquainted with him, but judging from what I saw and what I know, I think that to know him was to love him. I am sure he was held in the highest esteem and respect by those who were intimately associated with him. Undoubtedly he was respected by all the members of this House. I hope, Sir, that you will convey to his wife and daughters our sincere sympathy in the great loss which they have sustained. May his memory be to them a comfort and a joy, that he was a good father, a good husband, and a good public servant.

Topic:   DEATH OF MR. T. H. THOMPSON, M.P.
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LIB

George Newcombe Gordon (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. DEPUTY SPEAKER:

As requested,

I shall immediately transmit to the bereaved widow and daughters the expressions of sympathy which have been extended to them by the hon. gentlemen who have expressed their tributes of esteem and respect for the deceased.

Topic:   DEATH OF MR. T. H. THOMPSON, M.P.
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QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk).


SOLDIER SETTLEMENT-INSURANCE

PRO

*Mr. SPENCER:

Progressive

1. During the years 1922, 1923 and 1924, what did the Soldier Settlement Board pay in annual protection

[Mr. Meighen.1 , j ; jJ J

with regard to insurance in Alberta on (a) buildings on lands under contract to settlers; (b) on buildings situated on lands which have reverted to the board?

2. What was the percentage of repayments by settlers during the years above mentioned, where the insurance has been paid by the board?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   SOLDIER SETTLEMENT-INSURANCE
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LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Immigration and Colonization)

Liberal

Hon. Mr. ROBB:

Mr. Speaker, I understand that the hon. gentleman has been in communication with his friends who desired this information, with a view to having the question modified. Perhaps he would be prepared to drop this question, and place a modified form of it on the order paper.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   SOLDIER SETTLEMENT-INSURANCE
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LIB

George Newcombe Gordon (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. DEPUTY SPEAKER:

Dropped.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   SOLDIER SETTLEMENT-INSURANCE
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SOLDIER SETTLEMENT-SADDLE LAKE

PRO

Mr. KELLNER:

Progressive

1. Did the Soldier Settlement Board pay to the Department of Indian Affairs the sum of some $43,000 as an initial payment on the purchase of some 18,000 acres of land comprising a portion of the Saddle Lake

reserve ?

2. If so, by what authority was this done?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   SOLDIER SETTLEMENT-SADDLE LAKE
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LIB

Hon. Mr. ROBB: (Minister of Immigration and Colonization)

Liberal

1. Yes.

2. Section 7, 10, Soldier Settlement Act, Chapter 71, 9-10 George V.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   SOLDIER SETTLEMENT-SADDLE LAKE
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KEEFER PROPERTY, PORT ARTHUR

LIB

Mr. CARRUTHERS:

Liberal

1. Was a building or buildings in Port Arthur the property of Mr. Francis H. Keefer, M.L.A., of that city, used by the government for any purpose during or after^the 'late war?

2. If so, on what terms did the government enjoy the use of such ?

3. What disbursements were made by the government in this connection, either by way of rentals, improvements, taxes, or other charges?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   KEEFER PROPERTY, PORT ARTHUR
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May 18, 1925