April 7, 1925

PRO

Thomas Sales

Progressive

Mr. SALES:

That is exactly what happens.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUANCE OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE ACTING MINISTER OF FINANCE
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PRO

Robert Forke

Progressive

Mr. FORKE:

What is my hon. friend's

question?

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUANCE OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE ACTING MINISTER OF FINANCE
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CON

James Dew Chaplin

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CHAPLIN:

Who pays the tax?

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUANCE OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE ACTING MINISTER OF FINANCE
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PRO

Robert Forke

Progressive

Mr. FORKE:

What tax?

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUANCE OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE ACTING MINISTER OF FINANCE
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CON

James Dew Chaplin

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CHAPLIN:

The 42 cents a bushel on wheat. *

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUANCE OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE ACTING MINISTER OF FINANCE
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PRO

Robert Forke

Progressive

Mr. FORKE:

There is none going over.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUANCE OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE ACTING MINISTER OF FINANCE
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CON

James Dew Chaplin

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CHAPLIN:

Well, is it not going over because the 42 cents a bushel is a prohibitive tax?

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUANCE OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE ACTING MINISTER OF FINANCE
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REVISED

PRO

John Livingstone Brown

Progressive

Mr. BROWN:

The flour that is ground out of that wheat is exported and commands a rebate.

Topic:   REVISED
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CON

James Dew Chaplin

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CHAPLIN:

I am glad I got my hon. friends moving; I am glad I have got under their skins just a little.

Topic:   REVISED
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Oh, oh.

Topic:   REVISED
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CON

James Dew Chaplin

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CHAPLIN:

Let me read what they

say about it in the primer which they put out to educate the people on tariff matters. Let me read for their own particular edification:

If the rates are so high, on the other hand, that foreign goods are excluded from the country, a tax is still extorted from the people in the shape of higher prices for everything they use.

Now what answer have you got to make to that? They go further than that. Here is a further extract for my hon. friends to take note of, and you will notice, Mr. Speaker, that they do not refer to manufactured goods. It is the general principle. It does not make any difference whether it is manufactured articles or raw material. Here is the quotation:

As already explained under a system of protection the consumer is compelled to pay a tax upon all imported goods that come under the tariff schedules-

Not on all the goods that come in, but on all goods that come in under the tariff schedules. It goes on:

Upon all goods of domestic origin produced under a protective system the consumer must likewise pay a tax, although in this case the revenue finds its way to the bank account of private individuals alone.

Now what kind of a theory is that to put up?

Topic:   REVISED
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PRO
CON

James Dew Chaplin

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CHAPLIN:

Not at all. I ask you now the question: Who pays the tariff tax? But that does not exhaust the points I am going to bring out. I will take now the question of cattle, something that has been disturbing the gentlemen from the west for a long time. They find a difficulty now in selling their cattle. When they want to ship them to the United States, what hinders them? Is it the tax? If the consumer pays the tax, why not ship the goods in and let the consumer pay th; tax?

Topic:   REVISED
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PRO

John Morrison

Progressive

Mr. MORRISON:

Does not my hon. friend understand that the tax is so high that the people in the United States will not buy the goods? The tax is prohibitive.

Topic:   REVISED
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CON

James Dew Chaplin

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CHAPLIN:

My answer to the hon.

gentleman is this: If the tax is prohibitive,

let me read him what these people say in their own book:

Topic:   REVISED
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EDITION


The Budget-Mr. Chaplin



If the rates are so high, on the other hand, that foreign goods are excluded from the country a tax is still extorted from the people in the shape of higher prices for everything they use. Now let us get along. I, heard in this House a gentleman from the northwest, whose name I do not recall at the moment, describe the situation concerning a carload of butter shipped from some point in Alberta to New York. By the time the freight and duty was paid, he said, there was very little left for the producer. Now what does that mean? Does that mean the consumer in the United States paid that duty on butter, or does it mean the producer paid it? But that does not by any means exhaust the matter. You can take almost any line of goods. I call as my next witness my very good friend the hon. member for Lunenburg (Mr. Duff), who, everybody will admit, is a perfect free trader, except on the matter of coal. What does he say? The United States have a duty of from $1.60 to $2 per one hundred pounds on fish. I ask this question: Do the United States people pay the duty on fish that goes in there from Nova Scotia? According to my friends from the west, they do; the consumer always pays the tax. The hon. member for Lunenburg goes on-Hansard 1923, page 112: For instance, the business in which I am mostly interested, fish, is hard hit, a duty of $1.60 per hundred pounds having been imposed on salt dry fish, and on salt fish, herring, mackerel and so on, a prohibitive duty of 2 cents a pound. The result is that anybody who ships these goods to the United States receives that much less for them, because the price governing fish is not fixed in the same way as the price on grain or manufactured products, that is, the price of fish is fixed in the foreign market, and consequently the shipper has to pay the duty. I hope I understand the English language.


PRO

John Evans

Progressive

Mr. EVANS:

The hon. gentleman has been quoting from the Canadian Council of Agriculture, from their platform and the pamphlet written on it. If he reads the English language, he will find a correct answer to his question in that pamphlet.

Topic:   EDITION
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April 7, 1925