March 11, 1925

CON

Hon. Mr. STEVENS:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Who prepared plans for the Harbour Commission's cold storage plant, Montreal, and what was the engineer's estimate of cost?

2. Were tenders called for the erection of said cold storage plant, and, if so, in what manner?

3. How many firms tendered, and what are the names of such firms or individuals?

4. What was the amount of the lowest tender?

5. At what figure was the contract awarded, and to whom?

6. What is the totail cost to date, based on engineer's approved certificates?

7. How much has actually been paid to said contractor ?

8. Has contract been completed? If not, what still remains unfinished?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   COLD STORAGE PLANT, MONTREAL
Permalink
LIB

Hon. Mr. CARDIN: (Minister of Marine and Fisheries)

Liberal

1. Mr. F. W. Cowie, Chief Engineer, Harbour Commissioners of Montreal, and Harold Rolph, representing the John S. Metcalf Company, Ltd., Montreal- Preliminary bulk estimate approved PC. January 30, 1919,

8900,000. Detailed estimate approved P.C.

May 7, 1919, 81,400,000, as follows:

Refrigeration and Equipment $485,620

Excavation and Piling Foundation.. 100,000

Superstructure 736,411

Power House J cost 77,969

2. On March 22, 1920, tenders were called for the superstructure only, by public advertisement in the local English and French newspapers.

3. Five, as follows:

1. E. G. M. Cape & Co. Ltd., Montreal, P.Q.

2. G. D. Loomis & Sons, Montreal, P.Q.

3. The Atlas Construction Co., Montreal, P.Q.

4. Geo. A. Fuller Co. Ltd., Cleveland, Ohio.

5. P. Lyall & Sons Construction Co., Montreal.

The Commissioners' Chief Engineer, Mr. F. W. Cowie, made a proposal for the building of the superstructure above tendered for, to be carried out by the harbour commissioners organization, with the co-operation of the John S. Metcalf, Ltd., Montreal, at an estimated cost of $957,174, including co-operation fees, &c.

4. Lowest tender for superstructure, $1,357,000, the John S. Metcalfe fee of 5 per cent for plans, specification and estimates, not in-included.

5. No award was made. The commissioners gave orders to carry out the whole work departmentally under the direction of Mr. F. W. Cowie, Chief Engineer. The work on the superstructure to be under the superintendence of the John S. Metcalf Company.

Questions

6. Cost to date, $2,930,723.38, as follows:

Refrigeration and equipment. ..$1,290,494 62Excavation and piling foundation 125,526 73Superstructure

1,350,308 42Power House 5 cost

164,393 617. For plans, specifications, superintendence and co-operation, $60,705.42, was paid to JohnS. Metcalf Co. Ltd.8. Building was completed by harbour commissioners' organization, and plant was put in operation in May, 1922.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   COLD STORAGE PLANT, MONTREAL
Permalink

NO. 3 ELEVATOR-MONTREAL

CON

Hon. Mr. STEVENS:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Who prepared plans for No. 3 elevator, Montreal, and what was the engineer's estimate of cost?

2. Were tenders called for the erection of said elevator, and, if so, in wihat manner?

3. How many firms tendered, and what are the names of such firms or individuals?

4. What was the amount of the lowest tender?

5. Was the lowest tender, or any of the tenders, accepted? If not, for what reason?

6. Was a contract later given to Metcalf & Company?

7. What did such contract include?

8. Were tenders called for this changed or amended contract ?

9. What were the terms and amount of said contract ? .

10. What was the engineer's estimate of amended plan, and who prepared the plans?

11. How much has been jpaid to Metcalf & Company (a) to prepare original plans; (b) to prepare amended plans; (c) as commission as supervisors?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   NO. 3 ELEVATOR-MONTREAL
Permalink
LIB

Hon. Mr. CARDIN: (Minister of Marine and Fisheries)

Liberal

1. The original plans were prepared by The John S. Metcalf Coy., Ltd., grain elevator engineers, Montreal, their estimate being the sum of $2,347,000, not including percentage for plans, estimates, engineering, superintendence, etc.

2. By public advertisement, on 10th March, 1923, in all the English and French local newspapers.

3. Seven firms,-

(1) E. G. M. Cape & Coy., Montreal.

(2) Atlas Construction Co., Ltd., Montreal.

(3) John Quinlan & Co., Ltd., Montreal.

(4) Downing, Cook & Coy., Montreal.

(5) Quinlan, Robertson & Janin, Ltd., Montreal.

(6) Barnett, McQueen Co., Ltd., Fort William.

(7) Fegles Construction Co., Ltd., Fort William.

4. $3,217,S00. Jno. S. Metcalf Company's fee of 5 per cent for plans, specifications and estimates not included.

5. No tender accepted. Bids were too high.

6. Yes, on 17th April, 1923.

7. Plans, estimates, superintendence of work, preparation of bids for materials, tabulation and reports on same, provide at own expense all large items of working plant, and to assume full responsibility for satisfactory work.

8. Tenders were called on amended plans only.

9. Plans and specifications, 2i per cent, and engineering superintendence, 7i per cent, or 10 per cent in all on an amount not exceeding $3,000,000.

10. $3,194,500, including the 10 per cent for plans, superintendence, etc., as above mentioned in item 9.

11. (a) (b): Amended plans and original plans, included in original contract-(2J per cent).

Amount paid to 31st Jan.,

1925 $ 72,888.30

(c) Amount paid to 31st Jan.,

1925 160,617.49

(51 per cent) or total of.. .. $233,505.79 2 per cent being held back until final acceptance.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   NO. 3 ELEVATOR-MONTREAL
Permalink

POTATO EMBARGO

CON

Mr. HANSON:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Has the government any knowledge of the report as published in newspapers of the 7th and 21st instants, that an embargo against Canadian potatoes has been placed by the British government?

2. If so, what action, if any, does the government propose to take to have this embargo removed?

3. What action, if any, did the government take to prevent this embargo taking effect?

4. Does the embargo apply to potatoes grown in the United States?

5. If not, what is the attitude of the British government with reference to the importation of potatoes from the United States?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   POTATO EMBARGO
Permalink
LIB

Hon. Mr. MOTHERWELL: (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

1. Yes, the report is correct.

2. 3. When the possibility of the embargo

was first reported, the following cable was sent to the High Commissioner: "Unofficially

reported here that British ministry contemplate putting embargo on Canadian potatoes because of presence here of Colorado beetle. This beetle has been in Canada for half century and to take objection to it now would be extremely unfortunate and untimely in view of recent action of United Kingdom looking to promotion of inter-Empire trade by establishing marketing committee upon which dominions have been invited to appoint representatives. Urge you have any such suggested action stayed until whole situation is carefully surveyed from all angles as another ill advised cattle embargo incident would be unfortunate."

Questions

The following is a quotation from a letter addressed by the High Commissioner to the Right Honourable Lord Bledisloe, Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries: "I am enclosing a little article which appeared in the Manchester edition of the Daily Mail yesterday headed "U.S.A. Bacon".

You will notice in the last paragraph of this an allusion to potatoes, in case American potatoes should find their way via Canada to this country. As a matter of fact this would be commercially impossible because the duty on potatoes from the United States to Canada is thirty-five cents per 100 lbs. and the United States market is always higher than the Canadian, even in times of plenty like the present year, and if they went through Canada in bond they would be bound to be marked "U.S.A. potatoes."

You are probably well aware of the care taken in grading and marketing Canadian potatoes. They are run over wire screens for sizes, then bagged, and each bag must have a tag attached by a government inspector marked "Canadian A", and "Canadian B" or "Canadian C". I may add that the potatoes are examined by two government inspectors -by the original grader and the potato health inspector at the point of shipment.

The information I get is that it is practically an impossibility for the Colorado beetle to appear in any Canadian tuber because, as you know, the slugs feed on the leaf and they bury themselves in the earth, not in the tuber, and the tuber being run over wire screens for sizes and then run again over hand racks at the point of shipment precludes any possibility of them containing anything that might develop into a Colorado beetle.

These representations were, however, unsuccessful and the embargo was placed on Canadian potatoes. The government was, however, successful in inducing the British government to except from the conditions of the embargo any Canadian potatoes afloat at the time the embargo was put into effect.

A further attempt was made to have the restrictions removed, the following cable having been sent to the British ministry: "The Entomological branch of the Department of Agriculture has just completed a close biological study of the Colorado beetle and from their study of the habits of the insect, there would appear to be no danger whatever of the beetle being transported in shipments of potatoes exported from Canada.

The Colorado potato beetle in eastern Canada disappears from the plants by the end of September and enters the ground for hibernation. In fact, the large majority of the beetles are in the ground a month earlier.

66|

Potatoes exported from Canada to England are dug in October, at which time, as stated, the beetles are inactive, being in hibernation in the ground. After digging, the potatoes are machine graded before shipment and the danger that any beetles could remain in association with the potatoes through all this process is infinitesimal.

Our officers who have made special observations of this insect have never reported the finding of the beetles in bags, barrels, or other containers in which potatoes are shipped.

During the summer months when the beetles are active, there is a possibility of their being transported with any cargo, but it seems almost inconceivable that the beetles could be introduced with shipments of potatoes which are invariably dug after the beetles have entered the ground for hibernation.

We have no records, nor know of no cases in other countries the insect having been distributed through shipments of potatoes.

As the department has an established potato inspection service, Canada would suggest that the Imperial government accept shipments of potatoes from this country subject to their being accompanied by certificates as to freedom from Colorado potato beetle due to having undergone such grading and inspection as would permit of such guarantee.

No reply to this has yet been received.

4. A similar embargo, and for similar reasons, is placed against the importation into Great Britain of potatoes from the United States.

5. Answered by No.. 4.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   POTATO EMBARGO
Permalink

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-OFFICIALS

UFA

Mr. LUCAS:

United Farmers of Alberta

1. How many veterinarians were employed by the Health of Animals branch in Dominion of Canada during 1923?

2. How many were employed during 1924?

3. How many veterinarians were employed by the Health of Animals branch in each province during 1923?

4. How many were employed in each province in Canada during 1924?

5. What was the total amount of salaries paid veterinary employees of the Health of Animals branch in Canada during 1924?

6. What was the total travelling expenses of all employees of Health of Animals branch for 1924?

7. What mileage expenses were paid for motor cars for each veterinary employee of the Health of Animals branch in the province of Alberta, and what was the name and location of each employee?

8. W.hat is the total number of permanent officials engaged by the various branches of the federal Department of Agriculture who are located in the province of Alberta, and what are the names and locations of each?

9. What is the description of the work which these officials are required to perform?

10. What are the names and locations of permanent employees of the federal Department of Agriculture

Questions

located outside the province of Alberta who were temporarily employed within that .province during 1923 and 1924?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-OFFICIALS
Permalink
LIB

Hon. Mr. MOTHERWELL: (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Live Stock Branch-

W. 0. Watkins, district sheep promoter, Winnipeg (since resigned), was employed during the fall of 1923 grading rams in the province of Alberta; J. M. McCallum, chief, stock yards service, Ottawa, was employed for a period during October 1924, grading rams; E. J. Johns, junior stock yard agent, St. Boniface stock yards, St. Boniface, Manitoba, substituted for N. Curtis, stock yard agent grade 2, at Edmonton during the latter's statutory leave September 27-Oetober 17, 1924.

The undermentioned dairy recorders and testers, E. C. Crohn, Victoria, B. C. (resigned); J. H. Marshall, Hamilton, Ont.; S. Ross, Ottawa; A. M. Clark, Montreal, Que. (resigned); E. Young, New Westminster, B.C.; R. Snazelle, Seagrave, Ont.

These men were employed at various intervals -in Alberta during the years 1923-24.

These men were employed as travelling inspectors visiting farms to test cows entered in the Canadian record of performance test for pure bred dairy cattle. They move from farm to farm making the round of the Prairie provinces and British Columbia. Some of them did not return home for two years.

H. T. Wilson, poultry inspector in Ontario, worked at various periods in the province of Alberta during the years 1923-24.

EGG GRADINe AND INSPECTION

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-OFFICIALS
Permalink
CON

Donald Sutherland

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SUTHERLAND:

I. How many egg inspectors or graders are now employed by the Department of Agriculture?

2. What is the total of the annual salaries to be paid for the present year in this connection?

3. What are the percentages of the eggs graded in 1924 under the various grades provided in the act, viz. Class I-fresh; grade (a)-specials, grade (b)

extras; sub-grade I-pullets-extras; Grade (c)-firsts; grade (d)-seconds?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-OFFICIALS
Permalink
LIB

Hon. Mr. MOTHERWELL: (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

1. (March 4th, 1925) Twenty-six egg inspectors including one -chief egg inspector.

2. (Fiscal year 1924-25) $42,112.57.

3.

Percentage

Class (1) Fresh

Grade (a) specials

'Grade (b) extras 14.6

Sub-grade (1) pullet extras 08

Grade (c) firsts

27.9Grade (d) seconds

25.3

Class (2) storage Class (2a) preserved

Grade (a) extras

3.4Grade (b) firsts

19.7Grade (c) seconds

9.0Class (c) cracked and dirty 02

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE-OFFICIALS
Permalink

RUSSIAN FLOUR ORDER

PRO

*Mr. GARLAND (Bow River):

Progressive

1. Has the government any information regarding the large order placed by the Russian government with Canadian mills for more than $12,000,000 worth of flour?

2. If so, what arrangements, if any, have been made with the government regarding financing this purchase?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   RUSSIAN FLOUR ORDER
Permalink
?

Hon. Mr. OOPP:

1. No.

2. Answered by No. 1.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   RUSSIAN FLOUR ORDER
Permalink

FEDERAL AND PROVINCIAL TAXATION

CON

Thomas Langton Church

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CHURCH:

[DOT]

1. Has anything been done by the government to meet the Ontario government and co-ordinate federal and provincial taxation to prevent duplication and overlapping, on income, amusement and other forms of taxation, since last session?

2. If so, what action has -been taken?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   FEDERAL AND PROVINCIAL TAXATION
Permalink
LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Immigration and Colonization)

Liberal

Hon. Mr. ROBB:

1 and 2. A taxation conference was held at Ottawa in November, 1924, at which representatives of the Ontario government were present. On the ll!t-h of November representatives of the various provinces met the Acting Minister of Finance. On the following day the representatives of the provinces -met by themselves and passed a resolution, which was later presented bo the Acting Minister of Finance: " That a conference be called at the joint request of the p-remiers of Ontario and Quebec to deal with the problems which arise from time to time in the administration of provincial affairs and for -the purpose of such conference, but not in any way limiting the scope thereof, that the following be the agenda:-(1) Overlapping in departments

where joint federal and provincial jurisdiction is being exercised. (2) Consideration of income tax as to collection and allocation. (3) Exemption of all purchases by and on behalf of provincial governments from operation of sales tax. (4) Adjustment of federal subsidies to provinces with a view to having provincial subsidies bear a reasonable ratio to provincial expenditures. (5) Provincial taxation of all nationally operated railroads. (6) Inter-provincial relations in respect to succession duties. (7) Consideration of measures for reduction of taxation and further economies in administration."

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   FEDERAL AND PROVINCIAL TAXATION
Permalink

MALAGASH DREDGING

March 11, 1925