February 11, 1925

PRO
CON

Henry Herbert Stevens

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STEVENS:

Who is to blame for that? Surely he is not blaming the Canadian industrialist for that. The blame must rest

upon the manufacturer of agricultural implements on the other side.

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PRO

John Evans

Progressive

Mr. EVANS:

No, not at all. Why do

you put that construction upon it? It is so because the manufacturer in this country maintains that he only has a right to sell goods in this country. That is the idea of protection. The Minister of Customs (Mr. Bureau) made the statement in the House last session, in answer to the member for Macleod (Mr. Coote). It is true enough.

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CON

Henry Herbert Stevens

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STEVENS:

My hon. friend is referring to the application of the dumping clause as passed two years ago, under which the matter is in the hands of the Minister of Customs. He supported and we opposed it.

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PRO

John Wilfred Kennedy

Progressive

Mr. KENNEDY (Glengarry and Stormont):

Not at all; it was passed fifteen years ago.

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CON

Henry Herbert Stevens

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STEVENS:

No, it was amended two

years ago.

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LIB

George Newcombe Gordon (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. DEPUTY SPEAKER:

Order.

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PRO

John Evans

Progressive

Mr. EVANS:

I think the hon. gentleman

is wrong, Mr. Speaker. The amendment to the act passed in 1922 related only to natural products. The right hon. leader of the opposition at that time gave the government the worst castigation that I have ever heard.

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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

It was not bad enough.

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PRO

John Evans

Progressive

Mr. EVANS:

I admit, Sir, it was not bad enough. But this is what I want to tell the House to-day, when I make the point that there is no difference between the two parties: both the leader of the opposition (Mr. Meighen) and the member for Vancouver Centre (Mr. Stevens) voted with the government.

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CON
PRO

John Evans

Progressive

Mr. EVANS:

On that amendment. There is no mistake; I took a note of it at the time. I see it is six o'clock, Mr. Speaker. I hope I have been able to bring before you the conditions under which agriculture is labouring to-day. Agriculture must have these conditions removed before the present population, or any augmented population, can operate successfully.

At six o'clock the House adjourned without question being put, pursuant to rule.

The Address-Mr. Evans

Thursday, February 12, 1925

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February 11, 1925