July 19, 1924

CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

I am referring to a

member of the government.

Topic:   PENSIONS BILL IN THE SENATE
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LIB

Henri Sévérin Béland (Minister of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment; Minister presiding over the Department of Health)

Liberal

Mr. BELAND:

I am not particularly interested in what an individual member of the Senate may say; I am concerned with the action taken by the Senate as a body.

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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

What can the hon. member expect if the government leader there virtually requests them to take it?

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LIB

Henri Sévérin Béland (Minister of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment; Minister presiding over the Department of Health)

Liberal

Mr. BELAND:

The government leader

may be powerless in the Senate on any question.

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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

The trouble is he was

all-powerful; he had his way.

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LIB

Henri Sévérin Béland (Minister of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment; Minister presiding over the Department of Health)

Liberal

Mr. BELAND:

As I understand it, the

reasons invoked by the Senate for interfering substantially wfith the bill that was passed by this House is that they were not aware that a special report had been presented to

the House; that a prolonged inquiry had been made by a special committee of this House on the subject. However, we will see what the Senate says in regard to the message we sent to them early this morning, and then we will decide what action we should take.

Topic:   PENSIONS BILL IN THE SENATE
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TRAVELLING EXPENSES OF CABINET MINISTERS

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

During the discussion of

the estimates this morning there was an item that referred to the passage of my right hon. friend (Mr. Meighen) from Liverpool to New York, and I intimated that the government had been asked payment of the account, as it related to expenses that had been incurred but had not been paid. That was not through any neglect on the part of my right hon. friend or his secretary, but simply through the circumstances that he had evidently assumed the account had been paid by some one else. However, this bill came to us for payment. I said to my right hon. friend that we had a letter from him admitting the fact. He said he doubted that and asked to be shown the letter.

Topic:   TRAVELLING EXPENSES OF CABINET MINISTERS
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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

Will the right hon. gentleman read the letter? I have no objection.

Topic:   TRAVELLING EXPENSES OF CABINET MINISTERS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Ottawa, July 6, 1923.

Sir Joseph Pope,

Under-Secretary of State,

Ottawa.

Dear Sir Joseph,-

I have your letter of May 30t,h regarding charges for passage from Liverpool to New York in July, 1918, for myself and private secretary.

I understand that passages were arranged through the Admiralty Board, and it was presumed that charges were being absorbed by them. Mr. Garland, who was my secretary at that time and who had charge of such details, assures me that no payment was made by him at the time, and of course the item was not included in the statement of expenses.

Yours very truly,

Arthur Meighen.

I think that bears out what I said.

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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

I think the letter was

prepared for me by the same secretary, and I signed it. I have not even any recollection of what is in the letter. I have no doubt it is perfectly correct.

Topic:   TRAVELLING EXPENSES OF CABINET MINISTERS
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RETURNS

VOLUMINOUS, EXPENSIVE-STATEMENT BY THE SECRETARY OF STATE

LIB

Arthur Bliss Copp (Secretary of State of Canada)

Liberal

Hon. A. B. OOPP (Secretary of State):

With reference to the bringing down of returns and the comments made in that connection, while

Pension Act

I realize that hon. members are entirely within their rights in asking for any returns, I suggest that they give a little consideration to the fact that much of the information they ask for could probably be got from the departments. Voluminous returns sometimes have to be brought down which I feel sure no one would ever have time to read. As an illustration I laid on the table of the House this morning a return comprising over twelve hundred typewritten pages, containing correspondence with regard to Dominion Canners, Limited. It may be that some one wants to read it all-

Topic:   RETURNS
Subtopic:   VOLUMINOUS, EXPENSIVE-STATEMENT BY THE SECRETARY OF STATE
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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

Who moved for that?

Topic:   RETURNS
Subtopic:   VOLUMINOUS, EXPENSIVE-STATEMENT BY THE SECRETARY OF STATE
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LIB

Arthur Bliss Copp (Secretary of State of Canada)

Liberal

Mr. COPP:

The hon member for Norfolk (Mr. Wallace), I think. And it is only a partial return. Hon. members will see what an amount of work and expense is entailed in preparing the many voluminous reports asked for. As I say, hon. members are within their rights in demanding this information, but I feel sure that much correspondence is included in the information sought that is not of interest and that many details requested might be readily obtained from the departments. I only throw this out as a suggestion that returns could be much more readily brought down if the information asked for was reduced to a minimum.

Topic:   RETURNS
Subtopic:   VOLUMINOUS, EXPENSIVE-STATEMENT BY THE SECRETARY OF STATE
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ASSEMBLING OF PARLIAMENT

PRO

Oliver Robert Gould

Progressive

Mr. O. R. GOULD (Assiniboia):

I desire again to ask whether the government has any information to give the House as to when the next session will be called? I suggest that it should be very early in the year.

Topic:   ASSEMBLING OF PARLIAMENT
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

As I intimated when the question was asked yesterday, I am unable to say whether or not between now and the next session of parliament we will have a general election, so that I cannot answer my hon. friend's question. I do not contemplate a general election, but there is always a possibility. The meeting of the House will depend entirely upon the circumstances that arise between now and the end of the year. If nothing exceptional takes place I hope it will be possible to have the House called together in January.

At 1 p.m. the sitting was suspended until 1.15 p.m. this day.

The House resumed at 1.15 p.m.

Topic:   ASSEMBLING OF PARLIAMENT
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PENSION ACT AMENDMENT

July 19, 1924