July 18, 1924

LIB

Edward Mortimer Macdonald (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Mr. MACDONALD (Pictou):

Princess

Pats, 276 of all ranks; 22nd, 190.

Topic:   EDITION
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CON

John Arthur Clark

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CLARK:

That is an instance of the policy pursued by this government with regard to our defence affairs. Both these units should have at least 1,000 men, four companies. It was represented to these men when they agreed to become part of the permanent force that there would be a certain establishment, but that representation has been ignored, although these are two of the finest units in the Canadian corps. Moreover, it is a further evidence of the lack of attention to the question of the defence of the country.

Topic:   EDITION
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CON

Arthur Edward Ross

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ROSS (Kingston):

What are the royal schools of instruction?

Mr. MACDONALD Pictou): There are

schools of instruction in the different military districts where courses are given to militia officers and men. They include one at Winnipeg, one at Ottawa, one in Nova Scotia.

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CON
LIB
CON
CON

James Arthurs

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ARTHURS:

How many officers have been instructed by these various schools during the past year?

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LIB

Edward Mortimer Macdonald (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Mr. MACDONALD (Pictou):

Colonel

Walker is in charge of machine gun instruction. I will look uip the other information my two hon. friends have asked for and will give it to them later.

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CON

Item agreed to. Royal Military College, $365,000.


LAB

Joseph Tweed Shaw

Labour

Mr. SHAW:

Would the minister tell us

li tne fracas that took place at the college has yet been adjusted?

Topic:   EDITION
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LIB

Edward Mortimer Macdonald (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Mr. MACDONALD (Pictou):

I think a

good deal of unnecessary publicity was given to an incident that occurred at the military college last winter. It attracted a good deal of attention, but really did not amount to much. I am glad that my hon. friend has brought the matter up, because it will give me an opportunity of putting a report on Hansard with reference to this matter. I asked a committee from the Advisory Board of the Royal Military College to personally visit the college, and go into the whole mat-

ter. This they did, and they have given to me a report which, with the permission of the House, I will place on Hansard, unless my hon. friend wishes me to read it.

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LAB
LIB
PRO

Agnes Campbell Macphail

Progressive

Miss MACPHAIL:

I wish to give the committee some facts regarding the cost of maintaining students at the Royal Military College. The cadets at the Royal Military

College cost the college about $1,750 each per year and that is not taking into account the interest on the capital cost. The Royal Military College cadet is there at a cost to himself or his parents of less than $400 per year. He receives his military clothes, maintenance and recreation as well, for that sum. The government cuts his hair, washes his laundry, pays his dentist and doctor bill*., gives him horses, boats, canoes, 9kis and a swagger stick, but not a motor car. All told, it seems true, as a Kingston resident told the Star-I am quoting from the Toronto Star of March 22, 1924-that the Royal Military College is the cheapest college in Canada and yet the most exclusive. Each cadet, unless he lives too near the institution, or unless he takes French leave, gets his railway fare paid. So also do his parents when they bring him to college, or come to see him graduate and the board of visitors when they go their rounds. A recent academic statistician gave the cost of the cheapest of all university courses, the theological at about $800 a year. Canada makes the military calling more easy than the ministerial. There is more state aid for soldiers of the king than for the soldiers of the cross.

In view of the fact, Mr. Chairman, that we are suffering from great economic stress, in view of the further fact that the chief object of the Royal Military College, with some exceptions, is to produce a class of snobs, and first-class snobs, whose chief duty it is to carry the swagger stick with which the state provides them, in view of the further fact that the vote on tuberculosis has been cut, and there is a threat of cutting out altogether the vote for venereal disease, in view of the further fact that the question of rural credits has not been taken up this year on account of the cost, and that the Home Bank depositors have not been reimbursed, and it looks to me as if they would not be, in view of the further fact that the Pensions bill was killed by the Senate, or at least spoiled, I move, seconded by the hon. member for Medicine Hat, that item No. 96 be reduced by the sum of $100,000.

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LAB

James Shaver Woodsworth

Labour

Mr. WOODSWORTH:

How many boys or young men have graduated from this institution since the beginning?

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LIB

Edward Mortimer Macdonald (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Mr. MACDONALD (Pictou):

1,387 have attended the college since it was instituted.

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CON
LIB

Edward Mortimer Macdonald (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Mr. MACDONALD (Pictou):

My hon. friend from Centre Winnipeg and my hon. friend from Southeast Grey must not run

Supply-Royal Military College

away with the idea that all the boys who attend the Royal Military College become soldiers. It is true they receive a military training, in addition to a good education, but a large number of the best engineers who have been produced in Canada have come from that college. Men are to be found in every walk of life in Canada who have been trained at the Kingston Military College, and they all make good citizens.

Replying to my hon. friend from Parry Sound, I have forgotten for the moment the exact number who enlisted from the college, though I had occasion to attend at Kingston about a month ago at the unveiling of a memorial arch to the sons of the college who had fallen overseas, and my recollection is that seventy-five or eighty per cent of the graduates of the college went overseas and fought in the war.

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LAB

James Shaver Woodsworth

Labour

Mr. WOODSWORTH:

Has the minister any idea of the number of officers of the Canadian army to-day who are graduates of that college?

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July 18, 1924