June 19, 1924

PRINTING OF PARLIAMENT

PROPOSED AUTHORITY ON SPELLING


Mr. GAUVREAU (Translation) presented the third report of the joint committee of the Senate and House of Commons on Printing. .... Also the committee recommends that the order in council of June 12, 1890, defining the method of the spelling of certain words in official documents printed in the English language, shall continue to apply and be extended to all words in the English language; and that the New English Dictionary, known usually as the "Oxford Dictionary," be the standard spelling to govern all the public departments. [DOT]


LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

With all due regard to

the joint committee on the Printing of Parliament, the last paragraph of their report need not be taken in consideration by the House as it relates to a matter which was not referred to the committee. Under the rules and customs of British parliaments, standing committees are not administrative bodies and * their power is limited by such orders or instructions as may be given the House. When the committee on Printing was formed the House passed the following resolution:

That the select standing committee on Printing be empowered to examine and inquire into all such matters and things as may be referred to them by the House; and to report from time to time their observations and opinions thereon, with power to send for persons, papers and records.

It is evident, therefore, that since the question of the orthography used in official documents by the various departments was not referred to this committee, it had no authority to report thereon and the last paragraph of the report should be struck out. When the House is called upon to give its concurrence I shall rule then that this paragraph is out of order.

I may add that the House is perfectly free to refer the question of official orthography to this or any other committee, but until it has done so, no committee has power to take it up and make recoramendations.

I most strongly hold, however, for the King's English, and it is quite proper that the various departments should understand that the standard English spelling should be used in official documents. If the matter had been referred by the House to that committee, then it would have been their duty to consider it. I say this in all fairness to the members of the committee who are doing their duty splendidly.

Topic:   PRINTING OF PARLIAMENT
Subtopic:   PROPOSED AUTHORITY ON SPELLING
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LIB

Charles Arthur Gauvreau

Liberal

Mr. GAUVREAU:

At the end of the

session of our committee we could not refuse the petition of Mr. Fred Cook who asked that this question be considered by the committee, and we agreed to that.

Topic:   PRINTING OF PARLIAMENT
Subtopic:   PROPOSED AUTHORITY ON SPELLING
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LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

, But the House of Commons is above Mr. Cook or any other official.

Topic:   PRINTING OF PARLIAMENT
Subtopic:   PROPOSED AUTHORITY ON SPELLING
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IND

William Findlay Maclean

Independent Conservative

Mr. MACLEAN:

(York): I brought up

the question, and inasmuch as that question was not referred to the committee for consideration, I would be prepared to move that now.

Topic:   PRINTING OF PARLIAMENT
Subtopic:   PROPOSED AUTHORITY ON SPELLING
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LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

That question will come

up when the motion for concurrence is made.

Topic:   PRINTING OF PARLIAMENT
Subtopic:   PROPOSED AUTHORITY ON SPELLING
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NATIONAL RAILWAYS AND SHIPPING


Mr. W. D. EULER (North Waterloo) presented the first report of the select standing committee on National Railways and Shipping as follows: Your committee has considered item No. 138 of the Estimates for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1925. namely, loan to Canadian Government Merchant Marine Limited $900,000, and approve of the said item.


HON. MR. MURDOCK AND HOME BANK

LIB

Joseph Archambault

Liberal

Mr. JOSEPH ARCHAMBAULT (Chambly and Vercheres):

I had given notice that I would move to-day concurrence in the second report of the select standing committee on Privileges and Elections and it was my intention to do so. The hon. member for West Hastings (Mr. Porter) however, has telephoned me that he is ill. It would be repugnant to me to do anything that would inconvenience the hon. member, who throughout the proceedings has shown every courtesy to the Chair. At the same time the hon. member and the House will realize that the hon. the Minister of Labour (Mr. Murdock) is most anxious to resume his seat and this delay is causing him great inconvenience. I have therefore arranged with the hon. member for West Hastings to proceed on Wednesday, the 25th instant, and I now give notice that on that day I shall make the motion which I intended to move to-day.

Topic:   HON. MR. MURDOCK AND HOME BANK
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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

It would scarcely be

proper to proceed with a motion of that kind in the absence of the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King). The matter could not have been proceeded with in the last two days, anyway.

Questions

Topic:   HON. MR. MURDOCK AND HOME BANK
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CAPITAL PUNISHMENT

CON

John Franklin White

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. J. F. WHITE (London):

I beg to

present a petition from the Union Mothers' Club of London, Ontario, with reference to

the establishment of a central place of execution in Canada.

Topic:   CAPITAL PUNISHMENT
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HOME BANK

CON

Joseph Henry Harris

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. J. H. HARRIS (East York):

I beg

leave to lay on the table a petition signed by 38 persons humbly praying for the indemnification of the depositors of the defunct Home Bank.

Topic:   HOME BANK
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IMMIGRATION ACT AMENDMENT


Hon. J. A. ROBB (Minister of Immigration and Colonization) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 195, to amend the Immigration Act. He said: The bill contemplates very minor changes. With respect to persons ordered to be deported, if an appeal is granted, the time spent in Canada shall not be counted in the period of residence which is necessary to acquire citizenship. If the head of a family is ordered deported the minister may compel the transportation company t o take back with him the members of his family who accompanied him. The amendment provides also, under certain conditions, that free transportation shall be given to the immigration officers of the different provinces. There is a reference to medical attendance, and there is also some change in regard to the Opium and Narcotic Drug Act in relation to immigrants. Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.


PRIVATE BILLS

June 19, 1924