June 13, 1924

CIVIL SERVICE SUPERANNUATION

LIB

Edgar-Rodolphe-Eugène Chevrier

Liberal

Mr. E. R. E. CHEVRIER (Ottawa):

Mr. Speaker, the special committee appointed to consider Bill No. 122, an act to provide for the superannuation of civil servants, beg to submit the following as their first report:

Your committee recommend that they be empowered to sit while the House is in session.

I move that the report be concurred in.

Topic:   CIVIL SERVICE SUPERANNUATION
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Motion agreed to.


HOME BANK.

CON

Henry Lumley Drayton

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir HENRY DRAYTON (West York):

I beg to lay on the Table of the House a petition by depositors -of the Home Bank for the return of deposits.

Topic:   HOME BANK.
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SALARIES OF POSTAL EMPLOYEES


On the Orders of the Day:


LAB

James Shaver Woodsworth

Labour

Mr. J. S. WOODSWORTH (Centre Winnipeg) :

Mr. Speaker, in view of the very

general dissatisfaction among the postal employees in regard to the new salary schedule,

is it at all possible that the government can reconsider the question?

Topic:   SALARIES OF POSTAL EMPLOYEES
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

There must be some final court of appeal for decision in these questions of salary. Parliament has assigned to the Civil Service Commission the duty, amongst other things, of determining the salaries to be paid to civil servants. The government, in order to ensure the fairest possible consideration for civil servants in that connection, required that the Civil Ser-virs Commission should prepare its report in conjunction with the deputy ministers, and also in conjunction with the Audit Board. The government has taken particular care to see that the commission should carry out its wishes in that regard, and has on two or three different occasions referred back the report submitted by the commission to the government, before its final acceptance. I may mention that on the first or second occasion on which the Civil Service Commission submitted its report the report was signed by two of the commissioners. The postal employees requested that if possible the government obtain the signature of all three commissioners before accepting any report from them. The government insisted on that additional step, and the position of matters now is that the report has been made. The government had either to approve it or disapprove it. To disapprove it was to leave the salaries where they were; to approve it was to give effect to such increases as had been made by the Civil Service Commission. Unless parliament is prepared to revise the act which refers these matters to the Civil Service Commission and transfer the authority to some other source, I do not see that it is possible for the government to consider the report further. It would simply mean sending it back to the commissioners who would return it with the statement that that was their final judgment. I may add that they have set out at considerable length, in the statement accompanying the report, the reasons which have actuated them. The Audit Board has also placed its views on record. All these different views have been presented to the House in the papers which I have laid on the Table.

Topic:   SALARIES OF POSTAL EMPLOYEES
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CON

Joseph Henry Harris

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. J. H. HARRIS (East York):

I do

not find among the papers that were laid on the Table the correspondence exchanged between the Post Office Department and the Civil Service Commission. Will the government lay that on the Table?

British Naval Squadron

Topic:   SALARIES OF POSTAL EMPLOYEES
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I asked the

Civil Service Commission to have us supplied with all the correspondence which passed between the Commission, the Audit Board and the Post Office Department, and my understanding is that that has been done. There may have been verbal interviews a record of which has not been kept and to which no reference is made in the file brought down. But my understanding is that the two returns brought down-I do not know whether my hon. friend has both of them there-include all that there is in the way of correspondence.

Topic:   SALARIES OF POSTAL EMPLOYEES
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CON

Joseph Henry Harris

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HARRIS:

Do I understand that all the correspondence between the Post Office Department and the Civil Service Commission has been tabled?

Topic:   SALARIES OF POSTAL EMPLOYEES
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

According to

the statement of the Civil Service Commission, yes. I have asked the Civil Service Commission for a copy of all the correspondence that passed between the Post Office officials and themselves and the Audit Board, and the return which I have presented is the response made by the commission. But I will have further inquiry made and if there are any other papers I will have them brought down.

Topic:   SALARIES OF POSTAL EMPLOYEES
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VISIT OF BRITISH NAVAL SQUADRON


On the Orders of the Day:


LIB

Edward Mortimer Macdonald (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Hon. E. M. MACDONALD (Minister of National Defence):

Mr. Speaker, I desire to

direct the attention of the House to a despatch appearing in the morning papers from Vancouver containing a statement made by one of the papers in that city with reference to the forthcoming arrival of the British special service squadron on June 21. The Vancouver paper states that there will be no member of the Dominion government to welcome the ships, and it goes on to say that despatches from Ottawa indicate that members of the cabinet are too busy in the House to come to British Columbia, and that the British Columbia people are not quite satisfied with the situation. It goes on to say:

They recall that when the fleet was at South African ports Premier Smuts extended the welcome. In Australia Premier Bruce met them, and Premier Massey extended a welcome at New Zealand.

It goes on to say that Ottawa has shown little interest in the visit of the fleet, and it continues:

Its grant toward entertainment has disappointed Victoria and Vancouver, and there is a growing feeling that the Dominion authorities are conserving their energies in this respect until the warships reach Halifax and Quebec in August.

I desire to say that this statement is a very unfair one. The attitude of the government toward the cruise of this squadron and its visit to our Canadian ports is one of the friendliest interest, and we are animated only by the desire to extend the fullest and most appreciative welcome to those representative ships of His Majesty's navy. Our friends in British Columbia are hardly right in their reference to the visit of the squadron to Australia. The visit to Australia took place in March last, and the ships first called at the port of Freemantle, where they were received by the Governor of the state, and it was not until they had practically made the round of the island of Australia and came to Melbourne that Premier Bruce welcomed them there officially on behalf of that Dominion, Melbourne being the capital of the state. What we have done in regard to extending a welcome to the squadron has been that on behalf of the government, the officers of the squadron will be entertained on their arrival on the Pacific coast at a formal dinner, and in conjunction with the government of Alberta we have arranged to take twenty-five officers and two hundred and fifty of other ratings on these vessels through to Edmonton, visiting intermediate points, and from Edmonton to Calgary, and then back to Vancouver. We have asked the Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia to officially welcome the officers of the squadron to Canada on our behalf, and to preside at the official dinner which is to be given them on their arrival.

The squadron also expects to visit Halifax and Quebec, and I am sure that our friends in British Columbia can feel that there is no desire to discriminate, and there will be no discrimination, in regard to the expenditure of money as between the eastern ports and that great city on the Pacific coast.

As to the question of the right hon. the Prime Minister going out at this time to officially welcome the squadron, I am sure it is the judgment of the House, and that it would be in the judgment of the country, that it can hardly be expected that the House could spare the presence of its leader at this time, no matter how keen he may be to show the greatest possible attention to the officers of the squadron. For a similar reason I think the House will feel that this duty, which might otherwise fall upon me, would be rather difficult to perform at this time, having regard to the important matters before the House. We are looking forward, however, to having the representatives of the officers of the squadron visit the capital of

Gold and Silver Marking Act

Canada in the month of August, when I am sure the country will expect the Prime Minister and other representatives of the government to extend to them an official welcome similar to that which was extended in Australia by Premier Bruce.

Topic:   VISIT OF BRITISH NAVAL SQUADRON
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GOLD AND SILVER MARKING ACT, 1913, AMENDMENT


Hon. T. A. LOW (Minister of Trade and Commerce) moved that the House go into committee to consider the following proposed resolution: That it is expedient to amend the Gold and Silver Marking Act, 1913, to provide a standard quality for platinum goods. Motion agreed to' and the House went into committee, Mr. Gordon in the chair.


LIB

Thomas Andrew Low (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Mr. LOW:

This amendment is intended

to provide a standard quality for platinum goods; in other words, to give the same protection to platinum goods that is afforded to gold and silver goods.

Topic:   GOLD AND SILVER MARKING ACT, 1913, AMENDMENT
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CON

Henry Lumley Drayton

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir HENRY DRAYTON:

What standard of value does the minister propose to erect? Perhaps he might tell the committee how we are getting along in our production of platinum?

Topic:   GOLD AND SILVER MARKING ACT, 1913, AMENDMENT
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June 13, 1924