June 10, 1924

CON

Robert James Manion

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

The difference is that in

building a wharf or a railway it is for the whole population, but this is not. Here is an agricultural estimate of $5,850,500.

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PRO

John Livingstone Brown

Progressive

Mr. BROWN:

In regard to some items

included in that estimate, may I ask what about the money spent in eradicating tuberculosis? What about the money spent on this magnificent park down along the canal? Does my hon. friend want to charge all that against the farmers? I am admitting, of course, that that money ought to be paid.

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CON

Robert James Manion

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

I do not know what my

hon. friend refers to when he talks of eradicating tuberculosis and about a park down along the canal. I can read from the items here.

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PRO

John Livingstone Brown

Progressive

Mr. BROWN:

The eradicating of bovine

tuberculosis is paid for out of the agricultural estimates, and it is not a matter in which only the farmers are interested.

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CON

Robert James Manion

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

That is possible. There

may be a few little items here in which the farmer alone is not directly interested. Now, let me read the items.

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PRO
CON

Robert James Manion

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

Yes. I usually bring hon.

gentlemen to my left to their feet whenever I mention these estimates.

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PRO

Robert Forke

Progressive

Mr. FORKE:

That is because we want to get at the facts. I suppose there is an item included in the estimates for research. Assuming it was possible by scientific investigation to find a remedy for rust in wheat, would that benefit only the farmers, or would it benefit the people of the whole Dominion?

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CON

Robert James Manion

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

That would be a benefit

to the farmers, and certainly it would indirectly benefit the whole Dominion.

Customs Tariff

Mr. FORIvE: That is an agricultural estimate.

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CON

Robert James Manion

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

Yes, just as the discovery of Marquis wheat was of benefit to the whole of Canada. But let me mention a few of these items: Here we have Experimental

farms, $1,400,000. Would my hon>. friend the leader of the Farmers' party claim that that is of any direct benefit to me, that it is of direct benefit to the manufacturers?

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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Surely.

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CON

Robert James Manion

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

Well, the whole attitude

of my hon. friends is and always has been that what helps the farmer helps the whole country- but that which helps the manufacturer does not help anybody else. I do not wish to be unfair to my hon. friends, but at times they give one the impression of absolute selfishness in their attitude. I do not mean to say that to hurt their feelings at all, but when they argue that expenditure for experimental farms is of any benefit whatever to me they argue something that is beyond my comprehension.

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LIB

Thomas Vien

Liberal

Mr. VIEN:

Does my hon. friend compare

an appropriation for experimental farms to a grant of so much per ton of production to a particular industry? Does he not rather think that a bounty must be a payment on the basis of so much say per bushel produced- that is, if he wants to make the comparison?

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CON

Robert James Manion

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

Well, my hon. friend is

now arguing as to how it is done; I am not going into these little details. The point is this: Experimental farms are directly of advantage to the farmer, and agricultural colleges are directly of advantage to the farmer.

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UFO
CON

Robert James Manion

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

Yes, they are an indirect bonus to the farmer.

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UFO
CON

Robert James Manion

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

I differ from my hon.

friend; they are an indirect bonus to the farmer. Take, for example, the administration of the Destructive Insect and Pest Act.

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PRO

Daniel Webster Warner

Progressive

Mr. WARNER:

I would ask my hon.

friend if he would consider it worth anything to the implement manufacturers that the farmers are able to buy the implements they make?

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CON

Robert James Manion

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

Yes I do, and I consider it of great advantage to the farmer that he is able to sell his goods to the implement manufacturers and their employees. But that is what the farmer does not see; that is what

he does not admit. This afternoon some speaker derided the home market. Certainly I do say that, in a general way, as this helps the farmer it helps the whole country.

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June 10, 1924