June 10, 1924


On the Orders of the Day:


LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

I have received from the

Norwegian Consul General a communication which he has requested me to read to the House. It is as follows:

Montreal, June 10, 1924. Right Hon. W. L. Mackenzie King,

Prime Minister,

Secretary of State for External Affairs,

Ottawa, Ont.

This morning's Gazette published a Canadian press telegram from Ottawa to the effect that a member of parliament asked you for a statement regarding the arrest of the Spanish consul in Montreal. In this interpellation reference was made to an alleged protest by me against my colleague's arrest and to my alleged use of the term " colony " in referring to the Dominion of Canada. Inasmuch as, from press reports, you seem to have accepted the statements of the member in his inquiry as true, I am compelled to correct mis-statements made in this connection. The Gazette on the 7th in a local article stated that I had " protested " and the paper used the word " colony." This article was published without myknowledge. No reporter of the Gazette nor of anyother paper saw or interviewed me on this subject. I did not make a protest against the Spanish consul's arrest nor have I in this instance or on any other occasion referred to Canada as a " colony." I am too well informed to make that error. Although it is well established in international law that the archives and files of a foreign consulate are inviolable, I made no protest against the search of the Spanishconsulate. I feel that it should be left to the

Spanish government itself to take such steps in the matter as it deemed proper. My intervention in the case consisted of a visit to the Spanish consul at his request, as I am doyen of the consular corps in Montreal, and to an inquiry of the judge as to whether he was aware that Consul Maluquer is a Consul de Carriere. I also presented to the judge the Spanish consul's complaint against his treatment at the hands of the police. I am confident you will communicate the contents of this telegram to parliament and to the press.

L. Aubert,

Norwegian Consul General.

Prince Rupert Elevator

Topic:   CONSULAR PRIVILEGES
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NORTHWEST TERRITORIES-REPRESENTATION IN PARLIAMENT


On the Orders of the Day:


PRO

Donald Ferdinand Kellner

Progressive

Mr. D. F. KELLNER (East Edmonton):

I desire to remind the Prime Minister of a petition which I presented about a year ago signed by a number of residents of the Northwest Territories praying for representation in this House. The right hon. gentleman told me at that time that the petition had been transmitted to the Redistribution committee to be dealt with. I should like to know what progress if any has been made in connection with it.

Topic:   NORTHWEST TERRITORIES-REPRESENTATION IN PARLIAMENT
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

I shall have to refresh

my memory by a reference to the records, but I shall give my hon. friend an answer.

PRINCE RUPERT ELEVATOR On the Orders of the Day:

Topic:   NORTHWEST TERRITORIES-REPRESENTATION IN PARLIAMENT
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CON

Arthur Edward Ross

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. A. E. ROSS (Kingston):

I wish to

call the attention of the government to the : following paragraph which appears in the j Vancouver Province of the 4th instant:

Special to the Province

Prince Rupert, June 4-Word is received this morning that Premier Mackenzie King authorizes the announcement that a terminal grain elevator will be built at S Prince Rupert by the Dominion government. Provision for this will be made in this year's estimates.

In view of this statement, may I ask the government whether such an erection is contemplated, or whether such promise has been made?

Topic:   NORTHWEST TERRITORIES-REPRESENTATION IN PARLIAMENT
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Topic:   NORTHWEST TERRITORIES-REPRESENTATION IN PARLIAMENT
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SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES


On the Orders of the Day:


CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. ARTHUR MEIGHEN (Leader of the Opposition):

It is very important

that the supplementary estimates should be brought down at the earliest date. These estimates, I may say, are being used in the province of British Columbia in a by-election as the chief weapon of appeal, and the government in that way is put in a position which I know it does not like; the estimates are being used as a sort of political catspaw of the local administration. This would be obviated if the supplementary estimates were brought down.

Topic:   SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES
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GRAIN COMMISSION


On the Orders of the Day:


PRO

Oliver Robert Gould

Progressive

Mr. O. R. GOULD (Assiniboia):

I will repeat the question I asked yesterday of the Minister of Trade and Commerce (Mr. Low). The minister is now in his seat and he may be able to give me an answer. The question I asked was, whether the government would lay on the Table the interim report of the Royal Grain Commission.

Topic:   GRAIN COMMISSION
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LIB

Thomas Andrew Low (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Hon. T. A. LOW (Minister of Trade and Commerce):

We hope to bring it down very shortly.

Topic:   GRAIN COMMISSION
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CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1907, AMENDMENT


Hon. J. A. ROBB (Acting Minister of Finance) moved the third reading of Bill No. 127, to amend the Customs Tariff, 1907.


CON

Henry Lumley Drayton

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir HENRY DRAYTON (West York):

I desire to refer again to the position of a large number of the people of Lambton and Kent in relation to the question of the oil bounties which were removed as a result of the budget legislation of last year. Representations regarding this matter were made to my hon. friend which I was not aware of until last night, and I shall have to crave the indulgence of the House for a few minutes in order to consider the position of the crude oil producers of these counties. Speaking from memory, I think we have upwards of 3,500 wells from which crude oil is drawn. At the last session of parliament the Minister of Finance (Mr. Fielding) introduced as part of his budget proposals certain legislation which is to be found in chapter 63 of the statutes of that year, the effect, of which is, in short, to provide in the first instance for a sharp reduction of the bounty and to extinguish it altogether on and after July 1, 1925.

Customs Tariff

The total annual production of oil is something like 160,000 barrels of which total Lambton and Kent, the two counties chiefly affected, produce 145,238 barrels. It is an old industry to which the countryside has adapted itself entirely, and thriving towns have been built up. For instance, there is Petrolia, just as nice a little country town as could well be imagined, with a debenture debt of about $450,000, incurred largely in connection with the extension of municipal activities which result from the carrying on of the oil industry in the neighborhood. The great majority of the oil producers are farmers. The production is small and the costs are fairly heavy. As matters stand to-day the House must face the wiping out of the industry entirely, which simply means that Petrolia and Oil Springs will find it difficult indeed to carry on municipally. In addition to this, the farmers of Ontario, with the American market now absolutely closed to them, and with their own market very largely open to their American competitors, are none too well-off to stand further losses.

As I said, Mr. Speaker, representations have been made to my hon. friend that the oil bounty is a matter of vital concern to these little communities. It may be said that we have little to do with local conditions there, but I do not take this view, because if production ceases in that district we will have to buy American crude to the extent probably of $450,000 or $500,000 annually, which will simply add that much more to the adverse drain that we are now subjected to by reason of our currency being at a discount in the United States. But this is not a political matter; it is a matter of life or death to the people interested. The representations which were being made were not made through Conservative channels, they were made through Mr. Greenizen who, if I am correctly instructed, is the president of the local reform party; that is, he is the representative in those counties of my hon. friend's government from a party standpoint. His representations have just been put into my hands, and I am going to give them to the House, so that if this proposed legislation is enacted we will understand, and the country will understand that the government do not think that the farmers cf Lambton and Kent have any right to be in the oil industry. These representations are also old representations as will be apparent in a moment or two. Mr. Greenizen's letter to my hon. friend is dated April 4, 1924, and is as follows:

Dear Sir,-Referring to the recent interview Dr. Fair-bank and myself had with you regarding the legislation of last session whereby the bounty on crude petroleum produced in Canada is removed, we submit for your consideration the following facts:

1. Crude petroleum was first produced in America at Oil Springs in Lambton county, in 1858. This was followed some few years later by the discovery of oil at Petrolia.

2. The discovery of oil in Canada was followed by its discovery in Pennsylvania. These early Pennsylvania wells produced such enormous quantities of oil that the home market could not absorb it, and they began shipping to Canada as this market was then free to them. This resulted in a glut of oil on the market. The flush production of our Canadian wells had greatly diminished and with the competition of free United States crude oil it was seen our Canadian oil industry was threatened with extinction. This condition of affairs was brought to the attention of the government of the Honourable Alexander Mackenzie then in power.

I pause for a moment at that point of this appeal addressed by a Liberal to the Liberal government. If there is one thing more than another that my hon. friends talk about it is the protection-no, I will not use that word, for while they mean protection they say protection is an evil-it is the adoption of such a fiscal policy as will help in the production of our raw materials. And oil is a raw material. It is a raw material of great benefit to that class of the community which my hon. friends pretend to be so much in favour of, namely, the farming class.

Topic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1907, AMENDMENT
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LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

Order. I would call the

attention of hon. members on both sides to the fact that there is too much conversation going on. The Speaker can hardly hear what the hon. member is saying although he raises his voice. It is not fair to the hon. gentleman addressing the House that a general conversation should be engaged in on both sides.

Topic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1907, AMENDMENT
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LIB

June 10, 1924