April 4, 1924

CON

Simon Fraser Tolmie

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. TOLMIE:

Reverting to the importation of plants through the post office, I understand there were certain abuses with regard to inspection on the other side. Do I understand there is no more inspection in Great Britain?

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
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LIB
CON

Simon Fraser Tolmie

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. TOLMIE:

Through what ports on the Pacific will these plants be admitted?

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
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LIB

William Richard Motherwell (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. MOTHERWELL:

Victoria and Vancouver. We have just recently constructed a laboratory in Vancouver for that purpose.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
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CON

Simon Fraser Tolmie

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. TOLMIE:

What progress is the department making with the corn borer? Is it gaining at all? Is it scattering into new territory, or is it still pinned down to those counties in Ontario where it existed a few years ago?

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
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LIB

William Richard Motherwell (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. MOTHERWELL:

Yes I notice it

has appeared as far east as Kemptville. It is spreading into new territory, although in the older territory, for instance down in Essex county, I understand, restrictive measures have been employed with success, in co-operation with the farmers, and by cutting the ensilage corn at a different period, a great many insects have been destroyed going into the silo. Employing cultural methods, such as late fall plowing and deep plowing, are also considered to be quite helpful.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
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CON

Richard Smeaton White

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. WHITE:

What success has the department had in combating the corn borer by introducing parasites?

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
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LIB

William Richard Motherwell (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. MOTHERWELL:

Nature can sometimes be helped out a little by supplying parasites for particular kinds of pests. For instance, the grasshopper has a parasite that I think is somewhat helpful in destroying it; the corn borer has a parasite; and we are helping to combat pests by the introduction of these parasites. In this particular case the experiment is so recent that we are not, as yet, able to tell the result. It is hoped, however, that the parasite employed will multiply itself rapidly and assist us in exterminating the pest.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
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PRO
CON
PRO

Robert Forke

Progressive

Mr. FORKE:

Yes, the pussy cat. I repeat, it may seem a rather trifling thing to mention the little birds we find on our prairies, but they are the greatest insect destroyers and the greatest friends that the farmer has anywhere. I want to urge all the farmer members of this House to do all they can to preserve the bird1 life around their farms and their homes.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
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LIB
CON

Donald Sutherland

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SUTHERLAND:

Would my hon.

friend make any distinction between the species of birds? I understand an effort is being made at the present time in the United States to exterminate the crows.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
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PRO

Robert Forke

Progressive

Mr. FORKE:

Well, I do not know

whether the crow is to be regarded as a useful bird or not.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
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CON

Horatio Clarence Hocken

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HOCKEN:

W7hat about the rats if

we exterminate the pussy cats?

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
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PRO

Robert Forke

Progressive

Mr. FORKE:

It is rather a wide field

of discussion to enter upon ait the present time, but I assure my hon. friend that I would attach more importance to poison in getting rid of rats than I would to cats. Of course, the birds to which I refer are the insect eating birds. They are the species that I am anxious to preserve. Anyone who has studied this question and Teams the number of insects that one insect eating bird will destroy even in a day realizes the importance of preserving the bird life of the country. Man is altering the balance of nature by destroying certain species of life. When you

Supply-Agriculture

destroy bird life of this character you give insect life a tremendous advantage and an opportunity to propagate. As has been, already said, unless some check on the growth of insects is maintained, very soon all animal life would be destroyed. It is a very strong statement to make but it is true. And it is only by these checks of which I have spoken that insect life is kept within bounds. Bird life is one of the best checks on dangerous insects that we have and that is why I want to see it maintained. I do not desire to take up time unduly and will simply close with this statement: Anyone who lives in the country and takes an interest in bird life, in their habits and methods of living, will derive a knowledge that will make his life richer and happier.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
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CON

Simon Fraser Tolmie

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. TOLMIE:

Can the minister give any

information as to what measures have been taken to combat fire blight on the Pacific coast, or rather, west of the Rocky mountains? ,

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
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LIB

William Richard Motherwell (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. MOTHERWELL:

That is a matter

that will be dealt with in the next vote.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
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PRO

Harry Leader

Progressive

Mr. LEADER:

I do not know whether

this is the proper place to bring up the subject of bee keeping or not. If not, I should like to know under what item the matter can be brought up. I have received a communication from my city to-day asking me to use my influence with the Department of Agriculture to prevent the importation of foul brood in bees. I want to bring that matter to the attention of the minister. The communication referred to is from the Portage la Prairie Bee Keepers' Association and it reads as follows:

I have been instructed by the Portage Bee Keepers' Association to ask you to use y( Ur influence in having laws passed that will prevent the importation and spread of foul brood and othei diseases among bees.

Has that matter been settled?

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR
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LIB

April 4, 1924