March 14, 1924

SUPERVISION OF RADIO


On the Orders of the Day:


IND

William Findlay Maclean

Independent Conservative

Mr. W. F. MACLEAN (South York):

I should like to bring to the attention of the government a matter of urgent general interest to the general public. In the New York Times of March 12, its Washington correspondent makes this announcement.

More effective governmental supervision of radio communication, including authority to defeat attempts to monopolise the ether, was recommended to the House Committee on Merchant Marine to-day by Herbert Hoover, Secretary of Commerce.

Secretary Hoover, in his address, gave his approval to the purposes of the pending White bill, which aims to prohibit monopoly of radio communication, allowing the Interstate Commerce Commission to review the rates charged for such service and laying down drastic regulations governing the issuance of licenses by the Secretary of Commerce for the operation of broadcasting stations.

Is such provision for the protection of the public being made by the government of Canada? I would ask the acting Prime Minister (Mr. Graham) to let the public know whether any proposal looking to a monopoly of radio communication has been made in Ottawa.

Hon. GEORGE P. GRAHAM (Acting Prime Minister): The question of radio is not only new, but intricate, and I would not care to give an answer offhand. As a matter of law and of practice, the management of radio is in the hands of a branch of the Marine department. Licenses are issued; regulations are in force at the present time; inspection takes place; and a small fee is paid, of course, largely for the purpose of paying for this inspection. There has been communication, whether it has been of late or not, between the governments as to the proper control of radio, as there have been or are likely to be so many broadcasting stations that the conflict of the air waves interferes with proper communication.

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PRIVILEGE-MR. MEIGHEN


On the Orders of the Day:


CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. ARTHUR MEIGHEN (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, I regret very much to have to rise to a question of privilege. I have observed in an address given by the hon. member for Rimouski (Mr. d'Anjou) in this House on the 10th instant, words which attribute to me language as respects which I want to make contradiction.

I will read or attempt to read the exact language of the hon. member as it appears at page 197 of Hansard:

Le chef de 1'Opposition ne veut pas se rappeler qu'il a ete le principal insulteur de notre province et de notre race et que les partisans qui se tenaient a ses cotes fai-saient la meme sale besogne. Qu'il n'oublie pas une chose: les electeurs de la province de Quebec, toujours fideles a leur devise, se souviennent. Ils se souvien-dront qu'au cours de la Grande Guerre si nous avons connu des jours de tristesse et de deuil nous les devons au chef de l'Opposition et a son parti; ils se souvien-dront, d'autre part, qu'ils peuvent avoir confiance au chef du parti liberal, l'honorable premier ministre, qui a su garder son bon sens alors que presque tous ses compatriotes perdaient la tete pendant la guerre, et qui, fidele a ses principes, 6tant Canadien avant tout, a su se ranger aux cotes de ceux qui voulaient prot^ger leur pays avant de ddfendre l'Empire.

I have read all, that the context might be seen and no injustice done. I will read the translation as I make it:

The leader of the opposition does not wish to recall that he has been the principal insulter of our province and of our race and that the partisans who cling to his side engaged in the same dirty work. Let him not forget one thing: the electors of the province of Quebec, always faithful to their motto "Remember". They will remember that in the course of the great war if we experienced days of sadness and of mourning we owe it to the leader of the opposition and to his party. They will remember, on the other hand, that they can have confidence in the leader of the Liberal party, the hon. Prime Minister, who has preserved his good sense when almost all his compatriots lost their heads during the war, and who, faithful to his principles, being a Canadian before all else, has ranged himself on the side of those who desire to protect their country before defending the Empire.

It is to the first feature alone that I have a right to refer on this occasion, that which ascribes to me an insult to the province of Quebec and to the French-Canadian race. I only desire to say that no words of mine were ever spoken or can be found uttered in this House or out of this House in my entire public or, indeed private life, that afford the slightest foundation for the grave, and I had almost said, base, allegation of the hon. member for Rimouski. This denial I have made repeatedly, and in the whole carnival of calumny on this question no one has ever attempted to substantiate the allegation, so far as I have ever seen, by quotation from my words. The next is more brief:

Le chef de l'opposition semble vouloir agir de la meme fagon que sir John-A. Macdonald; il vient dans notre province flagorner notre clerg6 apres 1'avoir fait insulter.

The leader of the opposition seems to wish to adopt the same methods as Sir John A. Macdonald; he come3 into our province to toady to our clergy after having insulted them.

I can scarcely find words to describe this language. My only right, however, is to deny the allegation as I now do in the strongest possible terms. I can hardly conceive the type of mind which would ascribe that conduct to any person without the slightest foundation in fact. One more sentence:

Hudson Bay Railway

II a oublie qu'il fait partie de cette ligne de fanati-ques qui travaillent a rabaisser autant que possible 1'element canadien-frangais et qui tachent d'ecraser tous ceux qui ne partagent pas leurs opinions.-

He has forgotten that he is a member of that league of fanatics who labour to crush as far as possible the French-Canadian element, and who seek to wipe out all those who do not agree with their opinions.

I do not know what league is referred to.

If the hon. member would be more specific my denial could also be equally specific. I only say that I am a member of no league at all, either in this country or in any other, nor am I a member of any secret society, neither am I a member of any order, nor have I ever been.

BANFF PARK WATER POWER On the Orders of the Day:

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LAB

William Irvine

Labour

Mr. WILLIAM IRVINE (East Calgary):

Can the Minister of the Interior (Mr. StewarO inform the House what action if any has been taken with respect to the application for water power privileges in the Banff National Park?

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LIB

Charles A. Stewart (Minister of Mines; Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

Hon. CHARLES STEWART (Minister of the Interior):

There is before the department an application on behalf of the Calgary Power Company, but nothing has been done in the matter; no definite conclusion has been arrived at.

RUSSIAN TRADE DELEGATES On the Orders of the Day:

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LAB

James Shaver Woodsworth

Labour

Mr. J. S. WOODSWORTH (Centre Winnipeg) :

Does the government's reception of

the trade delegates from Soviet Russia mean the recognition of the Soviet Republic? Does the recognition by England of Soviet Russia involve recognition by Canada?

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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

No.

Hon. GEORGE P. GRAHAM (Acting Prime Minister): That is a large constitutional

question, which I think will be referred later to the Minister of Justice (Mr. Lapointe). At this moment the gentlemen to whom my hon. friend refers are in this building. I have had a conversation with them and with some of my colleagues have received the delegates and discussed trade matters with them. As to recognition of Soviet Russia, I do not know what such recognition on the part of England means so far as Canada is concerned; but in relation to the question of trade, I can only say that we are doing business on our own hook.

HUDSON BAY RAILWAY On the Orders of the Day:

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LIB

Joseph Archambault

Liberal

Mr. JOSEPH ARCHAMBAULT (Chambly and Vercheres):

I want to call the attention of the Minister of Railways (Mr. Graham) to an editorial that appears in the Montreal Gazette of to-day in which Mr. A. E. Warren, general manager of the Canadian National Railways, western region, is reported as stating that the Minister of Railways has ordered full speed ahead on the Hudson Bay railway. Is this statement correct, and has such an order been given?

Hon. GEORGE P. GRAHAM (Minister of Railways and Canals): I am glad that my

hon. friend has called my attention to this matter because the definition of the phrase "full speed" may not be fully understood.

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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

The Minister of Agriculture (Mr. Motherwell) has defined what that means.

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LIB

George Perry Graham (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Liberal

Mr. GRAHAM:

I am afraid this definition might not answer this query. Last year, as hon. gentlemen will remember, a certain sum was voted to rehabilitate or to repair and put in operating condition a certain portion of the Hudson Bay railway that has deteriorated during the past few years The estimate having gone through the House late, as nearly all estimates do under our system, very little of that money was expended. I had a conversation with Mr. Warren the other day concerning the matter with a view to taking some steps to expend a certain amount of money that I proposed to put in the estimates, and I believe the Canadian National Railways would be justified in proceeding with the work as soon as possible, trusting to the estimate going through the House.

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LOBSTER FISHERIES REGULATIONS


On the Orders of the Day:


CON

Alexandre Joseph Doucet

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. A. J. DOUCET (Kent, N.B.):

Have

representations been made to have the lobster fisheries regulations for the district of South Kent and Westmoreland in the province of New Brunswick altered, changing the date of August 16 to August 1 of each year? If so, what decisions has the Department of Marine and Fisheries arrived at in the matter?

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LIB

Pierre-Joseph-Arthur Cardin (Minister of Marine and Fisheries)

Liberal

Hon. P. J. A. CARDIN (Minister of Marine and Fisheries):

A petition has in fact been received by the Department of Marine and Fisheries in connection with this matter but no definite action has so far been taken.

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THE GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH

ADDRESS IN REPLY


Consideration of the motion of Mr. Kelly for an Address to His Excellency the Governor General in reply to his Speech at the opening of the session, and the proposed amendment thereto of Mr. Sutherland, resumed from Thursday, March 13.


March 14, 1924