March 6, 1924

PATENT ACT AMENDMENT


Hon. T. A. LOW (Minister of Trade and Commerce) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 4, to amend The Patent Act (French version). He said: The intention of the bill is to correct an error that occurred in the French version of the act passed last session. In the English version a period of one year is given in which application may be made for a patent and in the French version the period is two years. The bill seeks to correct that error. Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.


DEPUTY RECEIVER GENERAL'S OFFICE, TORONTO


On the Orders of the Day:


IND

William Findlay Maclean

Independent Conservative

Mr. W. F. MACLEAN (South York):

Will the Acting Minister of Finance (Mr. Robb) please inform the House and the country when the Deputy Receiver General's office in Toronto ceased to function as a place for public deposits at interest, with right of withdrawal in Dominion notes, and whether it is true that deposits on similar terms are still being received by the Deputy Receiver General's office in British Columbia and in the Maritime provinces. If nqt to-day, I should like to have an answer to the question on another occasion.

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LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Immigration and Colonization)

Liberal

Hon. J. A. ROBB (Acting Minister of Finance):

If the hon. member will place his question on the order paper I shall see that the information is secured.

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IND

William Findlay Maclean

Independent Conservative

Mr. MACLEAN (York):

As a matter of

practice I think I am entitled to ask the question on the Orders of the Day.

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LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

The question is rather

complex, and it might stand for answer until another day.

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IND

William Findlay Maclean

Independent Conservative

Mr. MACLEAN (York):

Very well; I

should be glad to get the information, however.

PRIVILEGE-Mr. MACDONALD (Pictou) On the Orders of the Day:

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LIB

Edward Mortimer Macdonald (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Hon. E. M. MACDONALD (Minister of National Defence):

Mr. Speaker, I rise to

The Address-Mr. Marler

a question of privilege. A few days ago in my absence, as I note in Hansard, the hon. member for Centre Winnipeg (Mr. Woods-worth) made a reference to myself in the following words:

Perhaps I should add that the Nova Scotia workers point out that the Minister of National Defence . . . has been, if he is not still, the solicitor for the coal companies.

I desire to say that I am not solicitor for the coal companies, nor for any other company, nor any person whatever.

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THE GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH ADDRESS IN REPLY


Consideration of the motion of Mr. Kelly for an address to His Excellency the Governor General in reply to his speech at the opening of the session, resumed from Tuesday, March 4.


LIB

Herbert Meredith Marler

Liberal

Mr. HERBERT MARLER (St. Lawrence-St. George):

Like other members who have

preceded me, I beg to congratulate the mover and the seconder of the Address on the admirable manner in which they portrayed the situation to the House. Both hon. gentlemen discharged the task with honour not only to themselves but also to the House to which they belong. I desire also to extend congratulations, if he is willing to accept my congratulations, to the leader of the Progressive party (Mr. Forke) on the way in which he, too, placed his case before the House on Tuesday last. While I am free to admit that I cannot entirely agree with all that the hon. member may have said, nevertheless he brought forward his policies and the policies of his party in a straightforw;frd and manly way, in a way, indeed, that every member of the House could well understand.

I have heard it stated on another occasion that this debate was a more or less innocuous proceeding. I cannot view the debate in such a light. On the contrary, I believe it is. a very important proceeding, enabling the government to hear the views, through hon. gentlemen, that are held in the constituencies they represent. I think it is the duty of every hon. member so to enable the government, by such expressions of opinion, to formulate policies for the good of the Dominion as a whole. You are aware, Mr. Speaker, that I represent in this House the division of St. Lawrence-St. George of Montreal. I do not think it is improper to say that that division is an important one, perhaps one of the most important in this Dominion. It is important by reason of its commercial and financial activity, by reason of the wealth and learning of its people, and by reason of its undoubted

devotion to the public good. I think I can safely say that no one can accuse the people of that division of narrowness nor of any lack of public spirit; and least of all can anyone accuse them of any failure to contribute to the taxes of this Dominion, for the administration of its affairs and for its development, a very considerable amount. Other qualifications these people have also; and I would ask hon. members to bear with me for a moment in that regard. The people whom I represent in this House are strong in their traditions. They reverence those old British and French traditions which in their opinion go so far as to make a nation idealistic rather than materialistic. And materialism, I think it is not improper for me to say may be found in many parts of this continent, more particularly outside of this Dominion. In addition to that, the people whom I represent are anxious to see maintained as their right and heritage the exercise of the English and French languages; and they desire to enjoy for all times the free and undisputed exercise of their various religions. All these things they regard as essential to good Canadianism. These traditions they cherish and desire to have maintained. While I am free to admit that what I have stated in this regard may strike some as being mere words, nevertheless, to the people I represent, and as well, if I may presume to say so, to the great mass of-the people of Montreal and of the province of Quebec, these same sentiments form a part of their daily lives, and they should be cherished and preserved for all time. It appears to me that they can be preserved only so long as this Dominion remains a free nation, both politically and commercially, under the British Crown. And it can remain free and retain its identity as such only so long as it progresses, and expands, and retains its population. If it loses its population, if it fails to go forward, if it retrogresses, then its identity will undoubtedly be lost; and when that is gone, beyond the shadow of a doubt those' traditions to which I have alluded will also be lost. That is one of the reasons, Sir, why I lay so much stress on the points which I have dealt with so far.

That being the case, there is a certain amount of alarm felt, and I think rightly felt, when we notice the lack of increase in population, and more so when we consider the great exodus of our people in the last few years. Happily the tide inwards is now increasing. But unfortunately the tide outwards is still very serious. Indeed if we look back and realize that for four long years this country poured out its blood and treasure,

The Address-Mr. Marler

and for five years more has been subject to the most heavy imposts-when we realize all that and see our population still leaving us, some of us wonder if all those sacrifices have been made in vain.

I think, Mr. Speaker, that we should be amazed at the emigration of our people which has taken place to the United States, and which has been in progress for some years past. My right hon. friend who leads the opposition (Mr. Meighen) dealt with this very point in his address before the House a few days ago. He spoke with the most meticulous care of this loss of population within the last year, he quoted figures month by month, and it seemed to me that he endeavoured to lead the House to believe that this emigration had taken place only in the past two years.

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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

I gave the figures for three distinct and complete years.

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LIB

Herbert Meredith Marler

Liberal

Mr. MARLER:

Well, I have no doubt whatever that my right hon. friend stressed only the last couple of years.

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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

They are the worst.

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?

Mr MARLER:

How much the worst?

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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

About four times.

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LIB
CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

From 1923. They are about four times worse than 1921.

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March 6, 1924