June 27, 1923

CON

Henry Lumley Drayton

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir HENRY DRAYTON:

That will be quite satisfactory, but my object in bringing forward the point now was that we might have some real, definite information on it when the resolution was under consideration. We had difficulty yesterday in learning anything.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   BUSINESS PROFITS WAR TAX ACT, 1916 AMENDMENT
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Motion agreed to.


INCOME WAR TAX ACT, 1917, AMENDMENT.


Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (for the Minister of Finance) moved that the House go into committee this day to consider a certain proposed resolution for amendment of the Income War Tax Act, 1917. He said: His Excellency the Governor General has been informed of the subject matter of this resolution, and recommends it to the favourable consideration of the House. Motion agreed to. Oriental Immigration


PROCEDURE-TORONTO VIADUCT.


On the Orders of the Day.


CON

Thomas Langton Church

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. T. L. CHURCH (North Toronto):

When the House adjourned last night it was agreed that the representatives of Toronto should be allowed an opportunity this morning on the orders of the day, or on a motion to go into committee of supply, of discussing the question of the Toronto viaduct. At the request of the mayor and council of the city of T oronto-

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PROCEDURE-TORONTO VIADUCT.
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LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

I would ask the hon. gentleman not to make any extended remarks or argument on the present occasion. Ample opportunity will be afforded when the motion is made for the House to go into committee of supply in a few minutes.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PROCEDURE-TORONTO VIADUCT.
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

It was agreed last night that an opportunity, would be given my hon. friend to take up this subject to-day. Perhaps he might move the adjournment of the House, or we can move to go into supply.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PROCEDURE-TORONTO VIADUCT.
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CON

Thomas Langton Church

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CHURCH:

At the request of many Toronto organizations-

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PROCEDURE-TORONTO VIADUCT.
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LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

I should call attention to the fact that it is against the rules, unless on a matter of urgent public importance, that an hon. member should move the adjournment of the House. All those motions for adjournment have been done away with in the rules and proceedings of the House. Let us live up to the rules. This question can be brought up when motion for supply is made to-day.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PROCEDURE-TORONTO VIADUCT.
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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

The House will surely be going into supply pretty soon, and the hon. member will then have an opportunity to bring the matter up.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PROCEDURE-TORONTO VIADUCT.
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LIB

Jacques Bureau (Minister of Customs and Excise)

Liberal

Mr. BUREAU:

It can be done by unanimous consent.

Mr. MACKENZIE KING- It is desirable that this matter should be discussed, and the Government is quite agreeable that it should be brought up. We will proceed with supply when the orders of the day have been called, and the hon. member can then bring up the question.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PROCEDURE-TORONTO VIADUCT.
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ORIENTAL IMMIGRATION


On the Orders of the Day:


PRO

Alan Webster Neill

Progressive

Mr. A. W. NEILL (Comox-Albemi):

I

desire to call the attention of the Prime Minister to order No. 45, standing in my name, which reads:

283^

Resuming the Debate on the Motion of Mr. Neill for the Second Reading of Bill No. 6, An Act respecting Immigration.

I introduced this matter very early in the session and the second reading was adjourned from time to time at the request of the right hon. Prime Minister, who stated bis conviction that the object desired to be attained could be better attained by means of negotiations with the nations concerned. We are now near the close of the second session of this parliament, and the province of British Columbia will be asking, with ever-increasing emphasis, what she is to expect in the way of relief on this subject. Is the Prime Minister in a position now to make any statement relating to the progress of the negotiation? Further, if the Prime Minister finds during the recess that these negotiations fail, will he consider the adoption on behalf of the government of this bill in question, which has proved very successful in New Zealand?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ORIENTAL IMMIGRATION
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

As I mentioned to the

House on an earlier occasion, the government received from the government of Japan representations to the effect that the Japanese government were prepared further to restrict the immigration of their labourers from Japan. It was pointed out in their communication to our government that any legislation on this subject by the Canadian government might be misunderstood in Japan, particularly if it appeared to be of the nature of exclusion; the Japanese government, it was stated, were anxious, on the one hand, to avoid any unrest in their own country, and, on the other to further the wishes of the Canadian parliament in a friendly way. We were asked if we would allow the Japanese government to show, as a result of its own action, what it might be in a position to do or was willing to do in this regard. Conferences have taken place between the Minister of Immigration (Mr. Stewart) and the representative of the Japanese government in Ottawa, as a result of which I think there is every reason to believe that a very substantial reduction in the number of immigrants coming from Japan to Canada will be made in the course of the ensuing months. If by any chance the facts should ^how that this endeavour on the part of the Japanese government to restrict its own people in the matter of immigration to Canada is not sufficient to achieve the object which we have in view of limiting the number of orientals coming into Canada, then, at a subsequent session of parliament, the matter may again be considered.

Supply-Toronto Viaduct

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ORIENTAL IMMIGRATION
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HOPPE AND ISENBERG LEASES


On the Orders of the Day:


LAB

Joseph Tweed Shaw

Labour

Mr. SHAW:

Can the Prime Minister tell me if the fiat issued in connection with the Hoppe lease has yet been cancelled by the Government.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   HOPPE AND ISENBERG LEASES
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June 27, 1923