June 27, 1923

LAB

*Mr. SHAW:

Labour

1. What persons, firms and corporations in the province of Alberta supply coal to the Canadian National Railways?

2. What price is paid per ton?

3. Are the contracts for such coal awarded by tender?

4. For what period have such contracts, if any, been awarded ?

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Subtopic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS-COAL
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LIB

George Perry Graham (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Liberal

Hon. Mr. GRAHAM:

I think on reflection my hon. friend will agree with me that it would not be in the interests of the Canadian National Railway Company to make this information public. The purchasing of this coal is not an easy matter for the buying department of the railway company, and to make public to every coal dealer what business we are doing with the other coal companies would probably tend to a combine on their part which might very materially increase the cost of coal to the railway company.

HALIBUT FISHERY TREATY Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister): The second resolution on

the order paper I notice is worded, " In Committee of the Whole I think this is a mistake.

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Subtopic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS-COAL
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LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

It is an error.

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Subtopic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS-COAL
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Yes. The

Minister of Marine and Fisheries (Mr. Lapointe) has a resolution on the order paper relating to legislation arising out of the treaty, and I think it would be well to hold this resolution over until after the other resolution has been advanced a stage so that the treaty and the legislation pertaining thereto may be considered at the same time.

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Subtopic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS-COAL
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LIB

DR. F. G. BANTING EXPRESSION OF THE NATION'S GRATITUDE TO THE DISCOVERER OF INSULIN

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister) moved:

That whereas the recent discovery of the insulin treatment for diabetes, by Dr. F. G. Banting of Toronto, as the result of devoted application and research, and the discoverer's disinterested and generous action in placing it at the disposal of the public, have conferred inestimable benefit, not only on the Canadian people but on sufferers in all parts of the world, it is expedient that Parliament should give some expression of the nation's gratitude to one who has rendered such distinguished service to science and humanity, and that such recognition should take the form of a vote of an annuity sufficient to permit Dr. Banting to devote his life to medical research.

He said: Mr. Speaker, I do not think it is necessary for me to supplement the words of the resolution by any comment; they speak for themselves. Moreover, the great service which Dr. Banting has rendered to science and to humanity is now known throughout the world. The government has felt that some formal expression by the parliament of Canada of the services of this distinguished Canadian would be fitting at this time and in giving it the form suggested by the resolution we believe we are interpreting the wishes of all Canadians. It is perhaps appropriate that I should recall that during the war Dr. Banting also rendered valuable services as a member of the Canadian Expeditionary Force, and was wounded in action. We feel that in Dr. Banting, who was born in Canada and is a graduate of one of our own universities, Canada has a citizen of whom all who belong to the British Empire are justly proud. He has brought added fame to our country and in return, as the representatives of the Canadian people in parliament, we desire to express our country's appreciation of the great work that he has performed for science and humanity. We hope that by the provision which the resolution suggests Dr. Banting may be enabled to devote his life to medical research in a manner which will add to the benefits his discoveries in the field of medicine have already brought to his fellow men.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DR. F. G. BANTING EXPRESSION OF THE NATION'S GRATITUDE TO THE DISCOVERER OF INSULIN
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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. ARTHUR MEIGHEN (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, the resolution, I think, constitutes a beginning, so far as public policy is concerned in this country, of recognition in any substantial way of scientific and humanitarian achievement. Dr. Banting being a Canadian and having achieved his fame and his contribution to scientific advancement in this country, it is appropriate that we as a nation should be the first to act in recognition of his services. I do not think, although not pretending to any particular scientific attainment, there can any longer be a doubt as to the supreme value of Dr. Banting's discovery and the beneficial, indeed the curative, pro-

Dr. F. G. Banting

perties which it possesses. Ample demonstration that this is the case has been made by those whose judgment ma3'- be taken as final not only in our own country but at various points in the United States and as well in other lands. What it means in the way of alleviation of suffering, in the way of contribution not only to the length but to the happiness of human life, it is impossible to estimate and quite impossible to exaggerate. That Dr. Banting should be especially rewarded and that at the same time the reward should take such form as would be to him an encouragement to pursue his scientific activities, seems to me axiomatic. I am personally aware- by those words I mean on the information of friends of his who undoubtedly know-that what this scientific man endured in the way of privation, in the way of personal sacrifice, in order that over a course of long years of experiment he might bring to fruition the objects he had in mind, is as yet, and probably always will be, unknown to the public at large. I can vouch for it that he made everything bend,-when I say everything I mean much that meant suffering to himself- he made all things subordinate to the attainment of his great goal; indeed, in doing so he only repeated what all men have had to do from the beginning of time to achieve any such wonderful result as he in this instance has brought about. Consequently it is only just to the people of our country, only just to the good name of Canada that this parliament should in a fitting way recognize what he has done for the nation and for the world. It is best from the standpoint of interest that we do it; for it will enable Dr. Banting from now on to pursue investigations along similar and other lines, from which investigations there is at least reasonable hope that results will ensue of great benefit to the human race. Therefore, as one who feels that the country should act in honour to its citizens; as one who feels as well that the greatest benefits to the world in the future are to come from scientific research and scientific achievement,

I have real pleasure in seconding the resolution.

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Subtopic:   DR. F. G. BANTING EXPRESSION OF THE NATION'S GRATITUDE TO THE DISCOVERER OF INSULIN
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PRO

Robert Forke

Progressive

Mr. ROBERT FORKE (Brandon):

Mr. Speaker, I feel very happy to have the privilege of being associated with the resolution now before the House. Dr. Banting's name is now known all over the world, and it is peculiarly gratifying to the Canadian people that a discovery so important and of such great benefit to humanity should have been made by a Canadian. I feel sure that money will have no peculiar attraction for Dr. Banting ; that his great ambition is to achieve some-

thing for the benefit and the service of humanity. However, I am very glad that we are making some contribution which will in effect be opening the door of opportunity to him so that he can more consistently devote his time to the great work he has undertaken, a work which is a blessing to humanity and the results accruing from which bring honour to himself as well as to his country. I repeat that I am pleased to be associated with hon. members of the House in paying this tribute to Dr. Banting,-a man whom the people delight to honour.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DR. F. G. BANTING EXPRESSION OF THE NATION'S GRATITUDE TO THE DISCOVERER OF INSULIN
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LIB

Henri Sévérin Béland (Minister of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment; Minister presiding over the Department of Health)

Liberal

Hon. H. S. BELAND (Minister in charge of the Department of Health):

Mr. Speaker, I desire to add just a few words in support of the resolution introduced by the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King), and to unite with him, the right hon. leader of the Opposition (Mr. Meighen), and the hon. member for Brandon (Mr. Forke), in paying tribute to the eminent physician who has achieved so much in the path of science, and particularly of medicine, in Canada. This move of the House of Commons will redound not only to its own credit, but, I submit, to the credit of Canada as a whole. It is a sincere though feeble endeavour to recognize the services of one who through many long days and nights has devoted his efforts unremittingly to forwarding the cause of science, and who has, as it were, drawn aside the curtain which hides from the human eye some of the numberless mysteries of science. The exact nature of Dr. Banting's discovery is still obscure to the layman. In a word, it consists in reducing or controlling pathological activities which are normal in the human body if not carried to exaggeration. Sugar is an element of nutrition, important-indeed, essential-to the life of man but if it is produced in exaggerated quantities the result is disaster to the human body. The , discovery of Dr. Banting tends to check this exaggerated fabrication of sugar in the system, and it is hoped that the use of insulin will not only temporarily reduce that pathological activity but do away with it entirely. Canada is still a young nation. It has however in the spheres of industry, agriculture and commerce accomplished enormous results. Unlike the European countries its steps have been somewhat slow in the field of science, literature and the fine arts. Only a few months ago it was my inestimable privilege to preside at the opening of an exhibition of paintings in our Museum. Those paintings were exclusively the work of Canadians, and I cannot say how much impressed I was by the excellence of the exhibits. Time will come, and only time can

Dr. F. G. Banting

accomplish that, when Canada will take her place among the older European nations in the field of fine arts, sculpture, music and painting. Dr. Banting's discovery does not *ank as an achievement in the fine arts. It is a good deal more than that and will bring its own special advantages to humanity at large. And so I say it is the duty of the Parliament of Canada to take whatever steps are calculated to encourage men to devote *their time with enthusiasm to scientific research, especially when the results of that work are to help humanity and relieve its sufferings.

Mr. Speaker, I think this House will accept the resolution unanimously, and as the minister presiding over the Department of Health I wish to say in the name of Canada that we extend our hearty congratulations and encouragement to this young physician, who has become illustrious not only in this country but in the world at large.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DR. F. G. BANTING EXPRESSION OF THE NATION'S GRATITUDE TO THE DISCOVERER OF INSULIN
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CON

Thomas Langton Church

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. T. L. CHURCH (North Toronto):

When this question was before the House on the 27th of February last the minister took the position that he could not do anything for Dr. Banting. I notice that the resolution does not include the name of Mr. C. H. Best, Dr. Banting's co-worker and associate. I think the country will approve the action of this Government in granting this annuity to Dr. Banting. It is a step in the right direction to recognize these men who are Canadians and Britishers for contributing something towards the advancement of medical science. It is well they should receive some recognition before they have died or left the countiy. I should like to find out from the minister if the name of Mr. Best is going to be included, and if any recognition is to be given to Dr. Macallum, who has made important discoveries in helium, and to other Canadian scientists. The Government of the Province of Ontario has appropriated $10,000 per year to establish a chair in the University of Toronto for continuing Dr. Banting's work. I think something might be done as well for Mr. Best, Dr. Banting's associate and coworker.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DR. F. G. BANTING EXPRESSION OF THE NATION'S GRATITUDE TO THE DISCOVERER OF INSULIN
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CON

Robert James Manion

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. R. J. MANION (Fort William and Rainy River):

I should just like to point out one fact in connection with this grant by the parliament of Canada to Dr. Banting which has not been mentioned, and that is the fact as I am informed on very good authority, that Dr. Banting could have exploited this discovery and was offered an almost fabulous sum for the purpose of exploiting the remedy which he has discovered. If

you look down through the history of medicine you will find, with one exception I think, that every discovery that has been made by a medical man in an effort to cure disease has been given freely to the world. Take antisepsis, which was discovered by Lord Lister, anaesthesia by Simpson and Morton, vaccination by Jenner, three of the most outstanding discoveries in scientific medicine in the history of the world and without which much of the health of to-day would be impossible. All these discoveries were given to the world freely. It might be of interest to the House, and I do not wish to utter any word of ill-feeling against anyone in this connection, to know that the one exception that occurs to my mind where a medical discovery was exploited was the preparation 606 which was discovered by Erlich, of Berlin, Germany. I personally am particularly glad, as I am sure is every medical man in the House, to see Canada taking this attitude towards the discoverer of a health-giving remedy, for unfortunately in the history of medicine and surgery too seldom has recognition been given. There is one country in the world, however, which has on many occasions honoured its scientific men more perhaps than any other country, and that is the Republic of France. As you walk around the streets of Paris you will frequently come upon a street named after some distinguished scientist, the Avenue Pasteur, for instance, and you will find many statues and monuments commemorating the men who have shown great learning in scientific work. I wish as a medical man, like the Minister of Health himself, to congratulate the government and parliament upon having decided to do this worthy thing.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DR. F. G. BANTING EXPRESSION OF THE NATION'S GRATITUDE TO THE DISCOVERER OF INSULIN
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LAB

James Shaver Woodsworth

Labour

Mr. J. S. WOODSWORTH (Centre Winnipeg) :

As we in this corner of the House have so frequently criticised public expenditure it is a great pleasure to be able to recognize the justice of the principles underlying this grant. I am not quite sure that it is setting a very good precedent for parliament to make grants in special cases, since I presume this body is hardly in a position to decide exactly v'ho most merits recognition of this character, but until we have some other body constituted for the purpose I am very glad to see that we are recognizing an achievement of this character. I take it from the remarks which have been made in this House and throughout the country generally that there has been a real contribution in this case and that we are proceeding along right lines when we recognize advances that are made in the scientific world. This action appeals, too, because in this particular case the achievement is one that is made

Dr. F. G. Banting

in the interests of the saving of life, whereas very often we have honoured as our greatest heroes those who have made their achievements not in the saving but in the destruction of life. It is a decided advance when we begin to understand that the saving of life is infinitely greater than the destruction of life for any purpose whatever.

There is another point to which I would call attention, and that is that we are getting away from the idea that men will accomplish great things simply to attain monetary success and only under the spur of competition. These motives have been held before us as the only ones which control men's activities at the present time, and I am glad to think that we recognize that men can work and work hard for other than financial advantage.

I like the way in which the motion is expressed, that this grant is made not only as a material recognition of past work but in order that this scientist may be able to continue to carry on his work. We have had the statement put forth very frequently that unless men were driven by the necessity of achieving some financial success they would not do any work. I believe that idea is absolutely wrong. If they are at all assured that they will have a competency, the truest men will go forward to accomplish even greater results. This recognition is probably an act of justice in one case; but we must look forward to planning that a great many of the more obscure workers in the fields of industrial and scientific research, as well as in many other departments of our life to-day, shall be given the same opportunity which has been accorded to this one scientific student-that is the opportunity of carrying forward their work and of performing something worth while in the service of humanity.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DR. F. G. BANTING EXPRESSION OF THE NATION'S GRATITUDE TO THE DISCOVERER OF INSULIN
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IND

William Findlay Maclean

Independent Conservative

Mr. W. F. MACLEAN (South York):

On behalf of the University of Toronto, and the other universities of Canada, I desire to thank parliament for this recognition of the discovery made by a worthy son of a Canadian college, Dr. Banting. Undoubtedly this action by parliament will have a beneficial influence within the University of Toronto, and the other universities of the country, and encourage their graduates, professors and students in the service of humanity and progress.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DR. F. G. BANTING EXPRESSION OF THE NATION'S GRATITUDE TO THE DISCOVERER OF INSULIN
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Motion agreed to.


HALIBUT FISHERY


Hon. ERNEST LAPOINTE (Minister of Marine and Fisheries) moved that the House go into committee this day to consider a certain resolution respecting the Northern Pacific halibut fishery. He said: His Excellency the Governor General has been informed of the subject matter of this resolution, and recommends it to the favourable consideration of the House. Motion agreed to.


BUSINESS PROFITS WAR TAX ACT, 1916 AMENDMENT


Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister) (for the Minister of Finance) moved that the House go into committee this day to consider the following proposed resolution: Resolved, That it is expedient to amend subsection three of section 13 of The Business Profits War Tax Act, 1916, and to remove the restriction of the said subsection by which the liability to pay the tax imposed continues for the period of only three years and by which the Minister is permitted at any time within three years only to assess such person for the tax, and to provide that the Act shall be construed as if the said restriction had never been contained therein. He said: His Excellency the Governor General has been informed of the subject matter of this resolution, and recommends it to the favourable consideration of the House. Sir Henry Drayton: I assume that what is being done here is a rather circuitous method of extending the operation of the business profits tax until the collections are all made. The act was a temporary measure, and I assume that the legislation will be extended so that all collections can be made.


LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I may point out to my hon. friend that this is merely a motion to have the resolution considered later. The point to which he refers can be explained when the resolution itself is being considered.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   BUSINESS PROFITS WAR TAX ACT, 1916 AMENDMENT
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June 27, 1923