May 14, 1923

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

A communication very similar to the one which my hon. friend has just read was received from the same firm by the Secretary of State (Mr. Copp) towards the latter part of last week and was referred to the Department of External Affairs. I ascertained at the time that the Under Secretary of State for External Affairs had already instituted an inquiry into the incident to which my hon. friend has made reference. My hon. friend will appreciate that conditions are very much disturbed in China at the present time. Mr. Lowe was one of fourteen or fifteen, I think, who were similarly tleated. He was released immediately after his capture, and the government of China made some apology; our government notwithstanding is making representations as to the incident with a view of seeing what reply the Chinese government may wish to make.

Topic:   CANADIAN CITIZEN IN NORTHERN CHINA CAPTURED AND MALTREATED
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MANITOBA GRAND JURIES


On the Orders of the Day:


CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. ARTHUR MEIGHEN (Leader of the Opposition):

The Manitoba legislature has passed a resolution, I believe unanimously, asking that it be relieved of the expense of grand juries-indeed, that the grand jury system be abolished. It hae petitioned the government to introduce this year legislation amending the code so as to make the desired change. Does the government purpose doing so?

Topic:   MANITOBA GRAND JURIES
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

I would like the Minister of Justice (Sir Lomer Gouin) to reply to this question. As soon as he takes his seat, I will direct his attention to the question.

Questions

WHEAT BOARD LEGISLATION On the Orders of the Day:

Topic:   MANITOBA GRAND JURIES
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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

Has the government yet passed its order in council bringing into effect the extension of the wheat board legislation of last year?

Topic:   MANITOBA GRAND JURIES
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Not yet.

Topic:   MANITOBA GRAND JURIES
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LIB
CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

Is there a difference of opinion?

Topic:   MANITOBA GRAND JURIES
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PRIVATE BILLS

SECOND READINGS


Bill No. 160 (from the Senate), for the relief of Edgar Lindsay.-Mr. Stewart (Leeds). Bill No. 161 (from the Senate), for the relief of Charles Marigoli Hare.-Mr. Duff. Bill No. 162 (from the Senate), for the relief of Esther Levin.-Mr. Gordon. Bill No. 163 (from the Senate), for the relief of Hilda Marguerite Watt Black.-Mr. Stewart (Leeds). Bill No. 164 (from the Senate), for the relief of Abigal Aileen McCrea Tull.-Mr. Huff.


QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orallj' are indicated by an asterisk.)


LABRADOR GOLDFIELDS, LIMITED

LIB
LIB

Hon. Mr. COPP: (Secretary of State of Canada)

Liberal

1. Yes.

2. Capital, $50,000 divided into 5,000 shares of $10 each.

3. Honora Charlotte Bellew and Beatrice Frances Ann Bellew, stenographers, Mary Law-lor, spinster, John Brown, contractor, and Arthur Thomas Forbes, bond broker, all of the city of Montreal, in the province of Quebec.

4. No official information of the precise area of the claims held by the Labrador Goldfields Limited under mining leases granted by the Newfoundland government, but if it may be assumed from the published advertisements of this company that their claims are situated on rivers flowing into Stag bay, then the whole of the area covered by their leases is within the disputed territory.

5. No; the Dominion government neither has waived nor intends to waive any rights of sovereignty which belong to, the Dominion in its own right or in that of the province of Quebec over or within the territory covered by the leases referred to; and it is not probable that the Newfoundland government can acquire any advantage by acts of administration while the boundary case is pendente lite.

6. No information.

7. The provisions of the company's act requires a prospectus to be filed and contracts to be referred to, liability for mis-statements is provided for. The government has no information regarding finding of gold on the property of the company.

8. No information.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   LABRADOR GOLDFIELDS, LIMITED
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RHINELAND OCCUPATION

LIB

Mr. ARCHAMBAULT:

Liberal

1. What was the cost to Canada for the Canadan army of occupation that was sent into Rhineland?

2. Did Germany or Canada pay for that cost?

3. At what date did this occupation cease?

4. Is the government aware that the American forces on the Rhine did not cost the United States a penny, that the Germans were paying the whole bill?

5. If Germany did not foot this bill for Canada, why did Canada receive a different treatment than the United States in that matter?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   RHINELAND OCCUPATION
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LIB

Edward Mortimer Macdonald (Minister of National Defence; Minister Without Portfolio)

Liberal

Hon. Mr. MACDONALD:

I and 2. It was estimated by the Overseas Ministry that the cost to Canada for the Canadian army of occupation amounted to $7,350,956.70.

At a conference of prime ministers, and representatives of the United Kingdom the Dominions and India, the allocation of the sums received from Germany was decided upon, Canada's share being $6,314,500. This amount has been paid.

3. March, 1919.

4. No information.

5. Answered by 1 and 2.

Questions

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   RHINELAND OCCUPATION
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May 14, 1923