May 14, 1923

WEDNESDAY EVENING SITTINGS


Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister) [DOT] With the consent of the House, I move, seconded by Mr. Fielding, that on Wednesday, the 16th instant, and on subsequent Wednesdays to the end of the session, the sittings of the House shall in every respect be under the same rules as provided for other days. Motion agreed to. IMr. Woodsworth.l


THE BUDGET DEBATE

LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Hon. W. S. FIELDING (Minister of Finance):

With the consent of the House, I beg to move that the order for consideration of the motion for Mr. Speaker to leave the Chair for the House to go again into Committee of Ways and Means have precedence over all other business, except the introduction of bills, until disposed of.

Topic:   THE BUDGET DEBATE
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Motion agreed to.


SATURDAY SITTINGS


On the Orders of the Day:


LIB

Lewis Herbert Martell

Liberal

Mr. L. H. MARTELL (Hants):

Will the Prime Minister tell us when the government proposes to commence Saturday sittings? It is very hard for the ordinary country legal practitioner to remain in attendance in Ottawa while the courts are being held throughout the country. I know that other members of parliament will find it difficult to remain here, and if the session is going to be stretched out to a very great lencth it will cause great inconvenience to many members. Therefore, I should like the Prime Minister to let us know when Saturday sittings will be commenced, and when we may hope for a termination of the session.

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

I am not in a position to give my hon. friend a definite reply. He is, perhaps, as capable of judging of the length of the session as I am. I should certainly say that during the present month the government would not consider the holding of Saturday sittings. Whether such sittings may be advisable or not a little later on will depend on the work which comes to the House from the committees. Mv hon. friend may be assured the government will keep in mind the point he has mentioned.

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DELAY IN BRITISH MAILS


On the Orders of the Day:


LIB

George Perry Graham (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Liberal

Hon. G. P. GRAHAM (Acting Postmaster General):

On Friday last the hon. member for West Toronto (Mr. Hocken) asked a question concerning delay in the transmission of newspapers from the Old Land to Canada and gave an example of one paper that was in transit from 6th April till 7th May. The Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King) in replying pointed out the extraordinary conditions that had prevailed during the past season-great storms in the ocean and almost calamities for the railways. Besides, sometimes there are delays at the beginning. A weekly paper is published, say, on the 6th,

but the first sailing to carry the mail may not take place until a week from that date-a week lost to start with. Take the case the hon. member has referred to. He referred to the date, April 6th. The paper was probably despatched by the British post office by the Marloch, sailing from Glasgow on 13th April and due to arrive at St. John on the 21st. This is one of the slower Canadian Pacific Railway steamers, and on this particular trip she had one of the worst passages she ever experienced, and did not arrive at St. John until the 29th of April-eight days over-due. The mails were forwarded from St. John on the same day, but owing to a washout on the line the train did not get farther than McAdam junction, and had to return to St. John. Permission then had to be obtained to run the train east of Moncton and via the Canadian National Lines to Montreal. This was done, but the train did not reach Montreal until the 3rd of May. As a result, the mails reached Toronto Friday evening the 4th. Owing to these delays, these mails reached Toronto at the same time as British mails from the Montcalm and the Canada, thus throwing an immense volume of mail at one time upon the Toronto post office and causing more or less congestion. In this way the particular paper in question was not delivered until Monday morning the 7th of May. The delay in its transmission as set forth above will be seen however, to be wholly exceptional. I might add that on 11th May, the day the hon. member asked the question, the London Times of 1st May was in the reading room -just ten days.

Topic:   DELAY IN BRITISH MAILS
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CON

Horatio Clarence Hocken

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HOCKEN:

Was the Marloch the first ship that sailed after the date of publication?

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LIB

George Perry Graham (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Liberal

Mr. GRAHAM:

I would not be sure, but it was the first ship which the British government used for the transmission of mails.

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CON

Horatio Clarence Hocken

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HOCKEN:

Does the British government not use the Canadian Pacific railway steamships, and did not the Empress of Britain sail before the Marloch?

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LIB
CON

CANADIAN CITIZEN IN NORTHERN CHINA CAPTURED AND MALTREATED


On the Orders of the Day:


CON

Henry Herbert Stevens

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. H. H. STEVENS (Vancouver Centre):

I should like to bring to the attention of the Prime Minister a matter which has been referred to me, and with your permission,

Manitoba Grand Junes

Mr. Speaker, I will read this telegram which is from the firm of Lowe, Buswell Company, Limited, of Vancouver, and addressed to Brigadier General Clark and myself:

You will have read in newspapers that Canadian citizen A. M. Lowe was beaten bound and made captive in northern China afterwards released on representations British consul. Urge you take up matter in session demanding explanation from Chinese government and substantial damages for outrage. Doctor Lowe member this firm and born in Victoria, B.C., resident in China two years. Your attention this matter will be very much appreciated.

Has the government taken cognizance of this incident and made any representations in protection and in behalf of Canadian citizens to the government of China, asking for the usual explanations and damages, if such, according to custom, -are deemed warranted.

Topic:   CANADIAN CITIZEN IN NORTHERN CHINA CAPTURED AND MALTREATED
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May 14, 1923