May 9, 1923

REPORTS


Agreement between the Imperial government and the government of Canada with respect to the prepaid passage scheme.-Hon. Mr. Stewart (Argenteuil). Report on the discovery of placer gold in Labrador.-Hon. Mr. Stewart (Argenteuil). *


PRIVATE BILLS

FIRST READINGS


Bill No. 155 (from the Senate), to incorporate National Surety Company of Canada. -Mr. Mitchell. Bill No. 156 (from the Senate), for the relief of George Austin Trow.-Mr. Duff. Bill No. 157 (from the Senate), for the relief of Ethel Jean Buchan.-Mr. Harris. Bill No. 158 (from the Senate), for the relief of Louisa Wemp.-Mr. Simpson.


QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk).


CANADIAN CUSTOMS OFFICER AT NEW YORK

CON

Mr. LADNER:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Has the government any information, and if so, what, with regard to the extent of business in lumber, canned salmon, pulp and paper, iron and steel and other products, as between Eastern Canada and the Pacific Coast, that is lost in favour of the United States owing to the fact that there is not a Canadian Customs Officer at New York and duty is imposed by the United States on goods passing through the Panama Canal from Eastern Canada to British Columbia?

2. Has the government any information, and if so, what, in regard to grinding balls to an Owen Sound firm from the Premier mine of British Columbia which was cancelled and placed in the United States because of the absence of a Canadian Customs Officer at New York?

3. Has the government any information, and if so, what, with regard to the advantages of a Canadian Customs Officer at New York, in facilitating trade between Eastern Canada and the province of British Columbia?

4. Has the government any information, and if so, what, with regard to the iron and steel used in British Columbia which might be purchased from Nova Scotia if a Canadian Customs Officer were established at New York?

5. Has the government any information, and if so, what with regard to the effect of the absence of a Canadian Customs Officer at New York on the amount of freight which might otherwise be sent over Canadian railways by the Canadian manufacturers and traders but which actually goes to the United States?

6. What would be the annual cost of maintaining a Canadian Customs Officer at the port of New York?

7. Does the government refuse to place a Canadian Customs Officer at the port of New York?

8. If so, what are the grounds of such refusal?

9. What are the advantages, if any, which accrue to the government of Canada or the people of Canada bv refusing to put the said Customs Officer at New York?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN CUSTOMS OFFICER AT NEW YORK
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LIB

Jacques Bureau (Minister of Customs and Excise)

Liberal

Hon. Mr. BUREAU:

1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. The government has no information.

6. This information is being ascertained.

7. No, the government does not refuse.

8 and 9. Answered by previous questions.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN CUSTOMS OFFICER AT NEW YORK
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GREAT LAKES AND ST. LAWRENCE SHIPPING TOLLS

CON

Mr. CHURCH:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Will legislation be introduced this session to place shipping and marine rates and tolls on the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence under some public control such as the Board of Railway Commissioners for Canada ?

2. If not, what will be done to afford the public some relief from excessive rates, both for freight and passenger rates?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   GREAT LAKES AND ST. LAWRENCE SHIPPING TOLLS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

The matter of marine rates and tolls is the subject of investigation by Royal Commission at the present time and it would not be possible to answer this question in any positive way until the report of that commission has been received.

Questions

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   GREAT LAKES AND ST. LAWRENCE SHIPPING TOLLS
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BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

CON

Mr. CHURCH:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. When will the report of the Royal Commission re Great Lake rates be received, and will an opportunity be granted parliament of considering their report?

2. When will the Ranking, Agriculture, and Redistribution Select Committees reports be received by the House?

3. Owing to the lateness of the Session, will these reports be received in proper time to have them dealt with at this session of parliament, or will they be left over for next session?

4. What legislation, if any, is yet to be brought down this session by the government, not referred to in the Address at the opening of parliament?

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

This question, I think, the hon. member is in about as good a position to answer as the government.

1. The government is unable to say when the report will be received, and it is impossible to say what opportunity will be given for consideration until it is received.

2. I suppose they will be received when they are ready, I cannot think of any other answer.

3. Obviously it is impossible to say what will be done with the reports until they are received, or what time may be available.

4. I answered this question yesterday in reply to my right hon. friend the leader of the Opposition (Mr. Meighen).

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
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DAYLIGHT SAVING IN OTTAWA

CON

Mr. GARLAND (Carleton):

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Has the government been officially advised by the Mayor of Ottawa that daylight saving becomes effective in the city on Sunday, May 13th?

2. If so, is it the intention of the government to recommend to parliament to conform to daylight saving time, and to make the same applicable to the public departments ?

Topic:   DAYLIGHT SAVING IN OTTAWA
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LIB

Right Hon. Mr. MACKENZIE KING: (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

1. Yes.

2. The government has assumed that parliament would wish to do this year as in previous years, adapt its proceedings to the local time. So far as the public departments are concerned, where daylight saving is being observed the public departments will be expected to conform to the usage of the locality.

Topic:   DAYLIGHT SAVING IN OTTAWA
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' PORT ARTHUR ELEVATOR

May 9, 1923