May 4, 1923

PRO

John Millar

Progressive

Mr. MILLAR:

Has the Minister of Agriculture (Mr. Motherwell) received any notification from the British authorities that the first shipment of store cattle to Great Britain was not entirely free from tuberculosis? According to a report in a Regina paper it would appear that they were not.

Topic:   CATTLE SHIPPED TO GREAT BRITAIN
Permalink
LIB

William Richard Motherwell (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. MOTHERWELL:

No report of that nature has been brought to my attention. As a matter of fact animals shipped for slaughter do not require to be tested for tuberculosis before entry into the United Kingdom. The conditions regarding tuberculosis apply only to breeding animals.

Topic:   CATTLE SHIPPED TO GREAT BRITAIN
Permalink

SINGAPORE NAVAL BASE


On the Orders of the Day:


LAB

James Shaver Woodsworth

Labour

Mr. WOODSWORTH:

In view of the vote of 650,000,000 by the House of Commons at Westminster for the naval base at Singapore,

C.N.R.-Express

and the comments in the British parliament and in the press that this signifies strained or possibly strained relations between Great Britain and Japan, I would ask whether the government of my right hon. friend (Mr. Mackenzie King) has acquiesced in this policy which is being pursued by the British government at the present time?

Topic:   SINGAPORE NAVAL BASE
Permalink
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I think it is for the British government to determine their own policy and for us to express no opinions concerning it.

Topic:   SINGAPORE NAVAL BASE
Permalink

CANADA HIGHWAYS ACT


On motion of Hon. Mr. Graham, Bill No. 151 to extend the period of the Canada Highways Act was considered in committee, reported, read the third time and passed.


CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS


Hon. GEORGE P. GRAHAM (Minister of Railways and Canals) moved the second reading of Bill No. 152 respecting the Canadian National Railways. He said: Mr. Speaker, the object of this bill is to allow the Canadian National Railway Company to do its own express business. Formerly there was the Canadian Northern Express Company, which afterwards became the Canadian National Express Company; there was the Canadian Express Company, which operated over the Grand Trunk and whose stock was vested in the Grand Trunk Company; and there was the Intercolonial Express Company, which had no connection with the Intercolonial Railway so far as ownership .was concerned, being a distinct company organized by other parties for the purpose of doing express business over the Intercolonial Railway. Eventually the Canadian Express Company took over the Intercolonial Express -Company. This combined company was afterwards amalgamated with the Canadian National Express Company in one organization. The stock of these various express companies of course is now vested in the Canadian National Railway Company, and for the purpose of economy the board has recommended that the Canadian National Railway Company itself be given power to do its own express business. Motion agreed to, bill read the second time, and the House went into committee thereon, Mr. Gordon in the chair. On section 1-Canadian National Railway Company authorized to carry on express company business: [Mr. Woods worth.!


CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

Why does the minister think that this is going to be the right method for the Canadian National Railway Company when it appears to be the wrong method for successful privately managed companies? The Canadian Pacific, as everyone knows, operates its express work through a subsidiary company-the Dominion Express Company. Other railway companies do likewise. I am not sure that the practice is universal, but it is almost so. Here, apparently, the practice is being changed. What is really to be gained by change? Of course, I am quite aware that just as the railways were amalgamated so the express business should be too, but why is it not amalgamated into one company operated as a separate company, thus getting whatever advantage the private railway companies get by that method?

Topic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
Permalink
LIB

George Perry Graham (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Liberal

Mr. GRAHAM:

We get away from one more of the many companies that we have in connection with the Canadian, National Railways. I could see some object in a private railway company having a separate express company in which there are sometimes other relationships that those interested in would not wish the railway company to be directly associated with, but I could not see any advantage of such a situation to a railway in which all the stock is Owned by the government. There is no stock of the Canadian National Express Company distributed among the public; there is stock of the other express companies outstanding.

Topic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
Permalink
CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

The Dominion Express Company?

Topic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
Permalink
LIB

George Perry Graham (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Liberal

Mr. GRAHAM:

I think so. Maybe the Canadian Pacific Railway Company practically owns all of the stock, but I think you will find some of it in the names of other people. As the stock of the Canadian National Express Company is absolutely in the hands of the government, the board thought it would be more convenient and economical if the railway company itself performed all the duties and functions of the express company.

Topic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
Permalink
CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

I do not see why it would not be true of the Canadian Pacific Railway if it is true of the Canadian National Railway, because I have always been informed very definitely that the Canadian Pacific Railway owns all the stock of the Dominion Express Company, and this company does no business save with the Canadian Pacific, just as our express company, as I understood it would do no business except with the Canadian National. Besides, the merging of the express

C.N.R.-Express

company in the parent company, extinguishing the separate corporation, if it is justified in the case of the express business, would surely, be equally justified in the case of the telegraph business. The telegraph business is still carried on by the Great Northwest Telegraph Company. Does the minister know any reason why he is dealing wth one and not with the other?

Topic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
Permalink
LIB

George Perry Graham (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Liberal

Mr. GRAHAM:

I do not know of any reason. I know we have one telegraph company called the Canadian National Telegraph Company.

Topic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
Permalink
CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

Yes, but the stock, as I understood, is owned by the other company

Topic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
Permalink
LIB

George Perry Graham (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Liberal

Mr. GRAHAM:

That may be. The question of the telegraph service has never been discussed. This matter has been discussed by the board pretty thoroughly, and they have arrived at the conclusion that there are economic reasons for taking this authority to perform the express business as a branch of the railway management rather than as a separate branch.

Topic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
Permalink
CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

The minister will remember that after he presented his railway budget I expressed the opinion that in the re-organ-lzation of the amalgamated railway systems upon the taking in of the Grand Trunk and upon the accession of Sir Henry Thornton there had been no very sincere attempt at getting the advantages of amalgamation. The struggle seemed to be more to find some place for everybody with a sufficiently dignified title. Now I come to the point as regards the merging of the express company in the Canadian National Railway. It is a fact, is it not, that Mr. Robb, all his life in charge of the mechanical department of the Grand Trunk, brought up in that department and the head of it for a long time until very very lately, has now been made vice-president in charge of express business? And does not 1he minister see that the purpose of this merger is just to enable the company to put Mr. Robb in with the title of vice-president?

Topic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
Permalink
LIB

May 4, 1923