February 19, 1923

LAB

Mr. IRVINE:

Labour

1. On what date and by what authority was the Joint Peat Committee appointed?

2. What are the names, addresses and previous occupations of the several members of the committee?

3. What was the total amount of money expended by the Joint Peat Committee to date, including grand total, also total spent each year?

4. Does the committee owe any moneys for goods supplied, property purchased, or services rendered? If so, how much, and for what?

5. What was the total amount of moneys expended by the Mines Branch, Department of Mines, upon experimental work at the Alfred peat bog, prior to the appointment of said Joint Peat Committee?

6. What estimated number of days were expended by each and sundry members of the Mines Branch upon work to aid the operators of the said Joint Peat Committee, the value of which time has not been charged up to or paid for by the said committee?

7. Is it the intention of the government to continue the operations of the Joint Peat Committee?

8. What precautions have been taken by the government to ensure the compilation of a full and complete technical report of the work attempted, the failures made, and the work accomplished?

9. What was the quantity of merchantable peat fuel manufactured and sold during 1922?

10. At what price was this peat fuel sold f.o.b. cars Alfred, and at what price did. the Joint Peat Committee permit this peat fuel to be retailed in the city of Ottawa ?

11. Where were the offices of the Joint Peat Committee located?

12. What are the names of salaried officers, their residential addresses, and what amounts were paid to each of them each year, for salaries and expenses?

13. Have any of the salaried officials applied for patents for improvements in the manufacture of peat fuel or in the machinery required in said manufacture ?

14. If so, when and in whose name were such applications for patent made?

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   JOINT PEAT COMMITTEE
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LIGNITE UTILIZATION BOARD

LAB

Mr. IRVINE:

Labour

1. On what date and by what authority was the Lignite Utilization Board of Canada appointed?

2. What are the names, addresses and previous occupations of the several members of the said board?

3. What was the total amount of money expended by the said board to date, also the amounts expended during each of the several years since appointment?

4. Does the said board owe any money for goods, machinery or other materials supplied, goods, machinery or other materials ordered but not yet supplied, property purchased or agreed to be purchased, or services rendered or under contract?

5. If so, how much and what are the details?

6. What was the quantity, in short tons, of briquettes made, and what was the quantity, in short tons, marketed, sold and paid for each year, and at what price f.o.b. Bienfait were the briquettes manufactured, sold in 1922?

7. Have the briquettes produced during the year 19211922 been found by consumers to be satisfactory as fuel?

8. Were the members of the board paid for their services or for expenses?

9. If so, what amounts were paid each year, and to whom, under both these headings?

10. What are names of salaried officers employed by said board, length of time employed, salaries paid, previous employment before being engaged by the Board, and salaries received by them in such previous employment ?

25$

11. What, if any, monetary obligations were undertaken by the board in excess of or in anticipation of government appropriations?

12. By whose authority were fourteen expensively constructed houses, besides a probably necessary boarding house, erected?

13. What were the reasons for such constructions, in face of the continued failure of the works to make briquettes commercially?

14. Were officials of the government employed, without remuneration from the board, to do work for the said board ?

15. If so, what were the names of such officials and what estimated time were they so employed?

16. Is it the intention of the government to continut the operations of the board?

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   LIGNITE UTILIZATION BOARD
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CIVIL SERVANTS-QUEBEC CITY AND DISTRICT

LIB

Mr. CANNON:

Liberal

1. What are the names of the civil servants employed in the various government departments who art stationed in the city and district of Quebec?

2. On what dates were they employed?

3. On whose recommendation was each appointment made?

4. What is the nature of their employment and the salary of each?

5. What are the names of those who passed the civil service examinations ?

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   CIVIL SERVANTS-QUEBEC CITY AND DISTRICT
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GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES-QUEBEC CITY AND DISTRICT

LIB

Mr. CANNON:

Liberal

1. What are the names of the government employees, temporary or permanent, employed in the city and district of Quebec who have been dismissed between October 15, 1911, and December 25, 1921?

2. What are the names of those dismissed following an inquiry?

3. What are the names of those dismissed without an inquiry-?

4. How many of these employees have been reinstated, and on what dates?

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES-QUEBEC CITY AND DISTRICT
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UNOPPOSED MOTIONS FOR PAPERS

MDLLE. ADRIENNE BOULAY

CON

John Babington Macaulay Baxter

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. Mr. BAXTER:

For a copy of all correspondence, petitions, reports and memoranda relative to the dismissal of Mdlle. Adrienne Boulay, postmistress at Sayabec, and relative to the appointment of her successor.

Topic:   UNOPPOSED MOTIONS FOR PAPERS
Subtopic:   MDLLE. ADRIENNE BOULAY
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VANCOUVER HARBOUR BOARD

CON

Henry Herbert Stevens

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. Mr. STEVENS:

For a return showing all correspondence, letters, documents, petitions, etc., passed between the government or any member of the government, or officials of the department and persons in Vancouver, B.C., relating to retirement of certain members of the Vancouver Harbour Board and the appointment of successors; also copies of the orders in council appointing members of the Vancouver Harbour Board since its inception; also orders in council that have passed since January 1, 1922, authorizing the expenditure of of moneys by the Harbour Commissioners in harbour improvements.

Topic:   VANCOUVER HARBOUR BOARD
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CORRESPONDENCE WITH MR. R. M. ROMBOUGH

CON

Henry Herbert Stevens

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. Mr. STEVENS:

For a copy of all correspondence, writings, documents, or other communications passing between the present

3S8

Proportional Representation

Prime Minister or any one on his behalf, and R. M. Rombough since May 1, 1921, on the subject of an investigation or proposed investigation into the Grain Trade. .

Topic:   CORRESPONDENCE WITH MR. R. M. ROMBOUGH
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PROPORTIONAL REPRESENTATION

MOTION BY MR. GOOD FOR ALTERNATIVE VOTE IN SINGLE-MEMBER CONSTITUENCIES

IND

William Charles Good

Independent Progressive

Mr. W. C. GOOD (Brant) moved:

Whereas the special committee on proportional representation appointed at the last session of the last parliament reported in favour of the adoption of the alternative vote method of election in all single member constituencies when more than two candidates were running for election, and also found much merit in the system of true proportional representation;

And whereas the last general election has fully demonstrated the many serious anomalies of the existing electoral system;

And whereas this matter was debated at the last session of the present parliament but did not reach a vote;

And whereas the government has promised to submit a Redistribution bill during the present session;

And whereas it is important that any desirable electoral reforms be adopted in conjunction with Redistribution ;

Therefore be it Resolved,-

That in the opinion of this House the alternative vote method should be adopted for use in future elections for this House in all single member constituencies where more than two candidates are rimning for election.

He said: Mr. Speaker, last year when I brought this matter to the attention of the House I included both of the proposals for electoral reform in a single resolution. I think that a mistake was made in so doing, a mistake into which I fell, I presume, because the two questions had both been referred to a committee in the preceding parliament (1921) and were both investigated and reported on by that committee. This year, however, I am submitting the matter in two distinct resolutions. The first proposal was unanimously recommended by the parliamentary committee of 1921, and no objection was raised to it in the course of the debate last year. I take it, therefore, Mr. Speaker, that we might dispose of this resolution without further debate, and proceed to the consideration of proportional representation upon which I presume there is a greater difference of opinion.

However, before putting the question I deem it advisable-in view of the fact that there may be some here who were not in the House last year when the matter was discussed and have not read the debate in Hansard- to explain very briefly the meaning of the expression "the alternative vote method". But before doing that let me point out, as I did last year, something of the need for this reform. In the Ontario elections of 1919, out of 111 contests there were 74 three-, four-, or five-cornered contests. In the Dominion elections of 1921 out of 235 contests there were

140 three-, four-, or five-cornered contests. I have not the figures as to the number of three-, four-, or five-cornered contests in the last British elections in 1922, but 178 were elected by a minority vote.

Now, Mr. Speaker, having thus pointed out very briefly the needs of the situation may I explain three points in connection with the system itself.

First, as to the ballot. The ballot under the new method would be identical with the ballot that we are accustomed to use at the present time. Second, with respect to the duties of the elector. Instead of placing a cross opposite the name of the candidate whom the elector wishes to vote for, the elector places the figure 1 opposite his first choice, the figure 2 opposite his second choice-if he so desires-the figure 3 opposite his third choice, and so on to any extent to which he may desire to go. In case of three candidates running it would be sufficient, of course, for any elector to mark on the ballot paper his first and second choices, to mark them by the figures 1 and 2. In the case of four candidates, he would be invited to place the figures 1, 2 and 3 opposite his first, second and third choices.

In the third place,-in respect to the count. The candidate who has the lowest number of votes is declared out of the running, and his votes are distributed among the remaining candidates according to the preferences expressed thereon by the elector. The process is simplicity itself, and the result is that we are quite sure that every candidate who is elected is chosen by a clear majority over all.

Topic:   PROPORTIONAL REPRESENTATION
Subtopic:   MOTION BY MR. GOOD FOR ALTERNATIVE VOTE IN SINGLE-MEMBER CONSTITUENCIES
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CON

Horatio Clarence Hocken

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HOCKEN:

May I ask whether, in the event of an elector only marking his first choice, that would be a good ballot?

Topic:   PROPORTIONAL REPRESENTATION
Subtopic:   MOTION BY MR. GOOD FOR ALTERNATIVE VOTE IN SINGLE-MEMBER CONSTITUENCIES
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IND

William Charles Good

Independent Progressive

Mr. GOOD:

Yes, I intended to mention that point. In answer to the hon. gentleman from West Toronto I may say that if an elector marks nothing on the ballot, of course the ballot is useless; but if the elector marks his first choice, either with the figure 1 or with an X, that ballot is perfectly good and it operates as our ballot does at the present time. But the elector's wishes in that event are impossible to discover in case his first choice comes lowest in the first count, or should be eliminated later in the count. The elector is, therefore, requested to put the figure 1 opposite his first choice, and he is invited, if he has any preferences, to express them on the ballot paper. If he does not choose to exercise the right which he has, then, of course, we cannot help it, he simply does what he does now; but the new method

Proportional Representation

of voting permits the elector to express his preferences beyond merely voting for one candidate.

I think, Mr. Speaker, .that as there was no objection raised to this particular reform last year, and as I have not heard any objection, it is needless to spend further time upon the resolution at present, and we might have the question put.

Topic:   PROPORTIONAL REPRESENTATION
Subtopic:   MOTION BY MR. GOOD FOR ALTERNATIVE VOTE IN SINGLE-MEMBER CONSTITUENCIES
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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

May I ask whether the government has any policy upon this question?

Topic:   PROPORTIONAL REPRESENTATION
Subtopic:   MOTION BY MR. GOOD FOR ALTERNATIVE VOTE IN SINGLE-MEMBER CONSTITUENCIES
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February 19, 1923