February 19, 1923

LIB

Charles A. Stewart (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister of Mines; Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. STEWART (Argenteuil):

No, no.

Topic:   KITSILANO INDIAN RESERVE
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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

I thought that was my hon. friend's statement.

Topic:   KITSILANO INDIAN RESERVE
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LIB

Charles A. Stewart (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister of Mines; Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. STEWART (Argenteuil):

If I left that impression on my right hon friend's mind, I did not intend to do so. That was their own suggestion.

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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

The government have not accepted that?

Topic:   KITSILANO INDIAN RESERVE
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LIB

Charles A. Stewart (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister of Mines; Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. STEWART (Argenteuil):

No, we have not accepted anything. We are trying to settle it. *

Topic:   KITSILANO INDIAN RESERVE
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PRIVATE BILLS SECOND READINGS


Bill No. 18, respecting The Dominion Fire Insurance Company.-Mr. Ryckman. Bill No. 19, respecting certain patents of Albert Manvers.-Mr. Jacobs.


QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk).


GOVERNMENT TELEGRAPHS

PRO

Mr. SALES:

Progressive

1. What is the number of miles of telegraph lines between Fort Qu'Appelle and Humboldt, and between Humboldt and Battleford?

2. What is the number of telegraph stations maintained on these lines?

3. What is the cost of maintenance, exclusive of salaries, of these stations?

Questions

4. (a) What is the number of telegraph agents employed on these lines, and (b) the total salaries paid?

5. What is the number of repair men employed on these lines, and what is the amount of the salaries and expenses paid to them?

6. What is the cost of material for repair of said lines?

7. What number of messages were handled by these lines during the last year?

8. Are the said lines serving any territory which cannot be served by telegraph lines along the railways?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT TELEGRAPHS
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PRO

Hon. Mr. KING (Kootenay):

Progressive

1. Qu'Appelle to Fort Qu'Appelle, pole line 17 miles; wire, 17 miles; Fort Qu'Appelle to South Humboldt, pole line 162 miles, wire 163 miles; South Humboldt to Battleford, pole line 127 miles, wire 171| miles.

2. East of Battleford 7 offices viz:-Qu'Appelle, Fort Qu'Appelle, Lipton, South Humboldt, Saskatoon, Henrietta and Bal-jennie.

3. Proportion of general average of outlay

(aside from salaries) for all lines and offices in Saskatchewan, $18 per mile (wire): For

the section embracing the above 7 offices, $6,327.

4. (a) 7 agent-operators and 1 lineman; (b) $10,980.

5. 2 linemen, 1 at Fort Qu'Appelle, salary $1,476 per annum; and 1 at Saskatoon, salary $1,620 per annum. Outlay for keep of horses, etc., is included in above-mentioned general average.

6. Cost of material used in maintaining the line is included in the above-mentioned general average.

7. 5,762 messages sent.

8. With the exception of Baljennie, the lines of the Canadian Pacific Telegraph and the Canadian National Telegraphs are now serving all points in the territory covered by the above described lines, in cofisequence of which the above lines and offices east of Baljennie, along with some other sections farther westward in Saskatchewan and in Alberta, are, in pursuance of an Order in Council, P. C. 141, of 30th January, to be discontinued and withdrawn by 31 March next.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   GOVERNMENT TELEGRAPHS
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YORKTON INCOME TAX OFFICE

PRO

Mr. SALES:

Progressive

1. What is the total cost of the office of Assistant Inspector of Taxation at Yorkton, Saskatchewan?

2. What staff is employed in the said office?

3. What are the salaries paid?

4. What rental is paid for the office?

5. What amount of income tax has been collected by this office, (a) from farmers, and (b) from other persons ?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   YORKTON INCOME TAX OFFICE
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LIB

Hon. Mr. FIELDING: (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

1. Cost including rent, 1 April, 1922 to 31 January, 1923, $11,756.80.

2. At 31 January, 1923, 8.

3. Salaries per month: G. H. Bradbrooke, $225; A. V. Laban, $133.33; A. J. Blackwell, $100; H. Hing, $100; G. W. Butt, $100; C. McNair $75; M. I. Lorimer, $75; J. Smith, $50.

4. $720 per year, which includes heating and lighting.

5. (a) None, (b) None.

Yorkton is a sub-district office and not a collection office.

The functions of a sub-district office are to assist taxpayers in the preparation of returns, build up and maintain a tax directory for the territory covered by the sub-office, conduct investigations and perform such other duties as are assigned to it by the Inspector t.'. Taxation for the district.

Mr. DUNCAN MARSHALL

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   YORKTON INCOME TAX OFFICE
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CON

Mr. SUTHERLAND:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Is Duncan Marshall now an official of the Department of Agriculture?

2. If so, since when has he been drawing salary as such and at what rate?

3. Is he the same Duncan Marshall who was several times defeated as Liberal candidate in Dominion Elections ?

4. Was he appointed through the Civil Service Commission ?

5. If not, how was the appointment made?

6. Has the said Duncan Marshall addressed a number of Liberal political gatherings while drawing salary as an employee of the Dominion government?

7. If so, how many, and where were such gatherings held ?

8. Did Duncan Marshall and W. A. Dryden go to Argentine, Chile, or Patagonia or any other South American countries at the expense of the government of Canada ns announced in the House of Commons by the Minister of Agriculture on April 3, last?

9. Have the said gentlemen visited Great Britain at the expense of the Government of Canada?

10. Did Mr. Duncan Marshall or Mr. Dryden, while on any such trips purchase stock on their own behalf or on behalf of either of them, and import such stock into Canada ?

11. If so, what number of animals were purchased by each of them, what were the breeds of such animals and when were they imported?

12. What is the total amount paid to each of these men by the government of Canada for salary and all expenses up to the present date?

13. Are these men or either of them now in the employ of the government?

14 If not, when did their duties cease?

15. How many pure-bred cattle or horses, sheep or swine have been exported from Canada to South America in the present fiscal year?

16. Have reports been made by either of the said men as to the duties they discharged while drawing salary or expenses from the government?

17. If so, are such reports available to members of the House?

18. What duties has Mr. Duncan Marshall performed that could not have been well discharged by expert officers already in the department?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   YORKTON INCOME TAX OFFICE
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LIB

Hon. Mr. MOTHERWELL: (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

1. Duncan Marshall is now an employee of the Department of Agriculture.

Questions

2. Since January 15, 1922, at the rate of $6,000 per annum.

3. The records indicate that Duncan Marshall, like many other able gentlemen, was defeated in the general elections of 1921.

4. No.

5. By order in council, P.C. 223 of February 7, 1922. (Under authority of Sec. 38C of the Civil Service Act as amended by C22 of Statutes of 1921).

6. No knowledge of such.

7. Answered by No. 6.

8. W. A. Dryden went to Brazil, Uruguay and the Argentine Republic on a mission for the Department of Agriculture but was not accompanied by any other agent or employee of the department.

9. Mr. Marshall spent some months in Great Britain on government business and, naturally, his expenses were paid by the government.

10. Not to the department's knowledge.

11. Answered by No. 10.

12. Duncan Marshall: Salary, $6,274.19; Expenses, $2,677.89; total $8,952.08. W. A. Dryden: Advance for expenses, $2,000.

13. Mr. Marshall is still in the employment of the government.

14. Mr. Dryden was never an employee of the government. On the mission indicated in the answer to question No. 8 his expenses were paid but he received no salary or other remuneration.

15. None.

16. Mr. Dryden has submitted a report on his observations and findings in connection with his trip to South America and Mr. Marshall has submitted a report on the Agricultural Instruction Act.

17. Both of these reports will be laid on the table of the House but it is not proposed to print either of them.

18. The investigational work conducted by Duncan Marshall in connection with the Agricultural Instruction Act, Dominion Exhibitions, and attendance at various international live stock and dairy conventions could have been performed by expert officers already in the department only by considerable neglect of their present duties. Mr. Marshall's special knowledge of pure-bred live stock and the importation thereof, together with his previous study of and experience with the embargo question marked him out as the one man, with Dr. Grisdale, to act as expert adviser to the Canadian Cabinet representatives at the recent British-Canadian Conference on this important question.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   YORKTON INCOME TAX OFFICE
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WHEAT SHIPMENTS TO MONTREAL

LIB

Mr. DESLAURIERS:

Liberal

1. Is it a fact that in August 1921, eighteen hundred to two thousand cars of wheat remained unloaded for weeks in the Port of Montreal?

2. What is the cost per bushel of transportation of wheat from Port Arthur to Montreal?

3. What does the Montreal Harbour Commission charge per bushel for the transferring of wheat to its elevators ?

4. What is its charge per bushel to load the grain on board ship?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   WHEAT SHIPMENTS TO MONTREAL
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LIB

Hon. Mr. LAPOINTE: (Minister of Marine and Fisheries)

Liberal

1. In August 1921 there were at different times in the Montreal terminals and Port of Montreal from one thousand to two thousand cars waiting to be unloaded, but the peak of from eighteen hundred to two thousand cars did not exist for longer than six or seven days.

2. The cost of transportation of wheat from Port Arthur to Montreal at the present time by rail is 341 cents per 100 pounds or 20-70 cents per bushel.

3. The charge for elevation of wheat from vessels to commissioners' grain elevators is four-tenths of 1 cent per bushel, including storage in the eievator up to 10 days free, and free fire and explosion insurance. In addition there is a charge of $2.75 per thousand bushels for shovelling the grain to the elevator buckets in the vessel's hold. The charge for elevation of wheat ex railway cars is six-tenths of 1 cent per bushel including storage in elevator up to 10 days free, and free fire and explosion insurance. The shovelling in this case is absorbed in the elevation charge. '

4. The charge for delivery of grain to ocean steamer over the grain conveyor system or otherwise is four-tenths of 1 cent per bushel.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   WHEAT SHIPMENTS TO MONTREAL
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February 19, 1923