June 27, 1922

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

I move, Mr. Speaker,

that the House now take recess to resume at eight o'clock to-night.

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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

Is there no business

ready from the Senate?

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

No; there

are one or two conferences taking place, but there is no legislation ready from the Senate.

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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

It is amazing

that the hon. member for West Calgary ''Mr. Shaw) does not take advantage of the opportunity afforded him of moving that a redistribution bill be passed this session.

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LAB

Joseph Tweed Shaw

Labour

Mr. SHAW:

I fear my right hon. friend was not in the Chamber when we received assurances from the Prime Minister on this matter.

Topic:   ORDER IN COUNCIL PRESENTED
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CON

Henry Lumley Drayton

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir HENRY DRAYTON:

A good many members are anxious to know what arrangements have been made for them to be paid off.

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LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

After conferring with

the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King) I have issued instructions that all accounts shall be settled.

Topic:   ORDER IN COUNCIL PRESENTED
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Motion agreed to, and the House took recess at 4 p.m. Acoustics of the Chamber



After Recess The House resumed at eight o'clock.


PENSION ACT AMENDMENT SENATE AMENDMENTS


On motion of Hon. H. S. Beland (Minister of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment) the amendments made by the Senate to Bill No. 192 to amend the Pension Act were read the second time and concurred in.


ACOUSTICS OF THE CHAMBER


Mr. HANCE J. LOGAN (Cumberland) : I desire to take advantage of this opportunity to bring to the attention of the Government, and particularly the Minister of Public Works, the poor acoustic properties of this chamber.


?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Hear, hear.

Topic:   ACOUSTICS OF THE CHAMBER
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LIB

Hance James Logan

Liberal

Mr. LOGAN:

I believe that is about

the most popular remark I have made this session. I think it would be popular even in the press gallery, where I am not always popular.

Topic:   ACOUSTICS OF THE CHAMBER
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Louder.

Topic:   ACOUSTICS OF THE CHAMBER
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LIB

Hance James Logan

Liberal

Mr. LOGAN:

Thank you. We meet

here as the representatives of the great Canadian people, to transact important public business, but the real facts of the matter are that two-thirds of the time we do not know what is going on in this House. I desire to say to the Government, because perhaps they do not realize how inadequate this chamber is in that regard, that when any hon. member is courteous to you, Mr. Speaker, and addresses the Chair he is not heard by the rest of the House, even if he is speaking from the middle of the chamber.

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CON
LIB

Hance James Logan

Liberal

Mr. LOGAN:

Thank you. I am told

by distinguished visitors who have sat in the distinguished visitors' gallery that they can hear very little of what is said from this side of the House, and nothing at all that is said from that side, which latter, perhaps, is no great loss. However, that is where we have the advantage, because we can hear hon. gentlemen opposite. Joking aside, this has just about reached the limit. As I said a moment ago, we come here as the representatives of the people, to do important business and to hear what is being said in this House. We desire also that the press gallery shall hear, so that the people of this country will know what is going on in Parliament, but as a matter

of fact very few of us can hear half of what is being said, and I am told that in the press gallery they also have difficulty in hearing the speakers. What I rose to do was to call the serious attention of the Government, and particularly of the Minister of Public Works, to this condition of affairs. Think of 't! We have built a twelve million dollar building in which we cannot be heard. It is ridiculous. It is not fair. It is neither just to us nor to the people we represent.

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LIB

June 27, 1922