June 27, 1922

CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

To submit typewritten copies of a bill and ask us to proceed, before any one has had a chance to look at it, is really asking too much from a long-suffering Parliament. No one has yet had time to study its provisions. We are told that printed copies of the bill are on the way to the House, and we are asked to legislate before those copies arrive. 11 enter my protest against such a proceeding.

Topic:   SOLDIERS' CIVIL RE-ESTABLISHMENT
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LIB

Henri Sévérin Béland (Minister of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment; Minister presiding over the Department of Health)

Liberal

Mr. BELAND:

The reason is that we

are anxious to send this bill over to the Senate so that it may be considered there and agreed to. Its provisions simply give effect to certain recommendations contained in the report laid before the House by the

Committee on Pensions, Soldiers' Insurance and Re-establishment. There is absolutely nothing in the present measure that is not contained in that report. There are a few things dn the report, however, which are not mentioned in the bill. For instance the recommendations of the committee dealing with pensions, insurance and land settlement have already been provided for by special acts. With respect to other matters, it is not absolutely certain that the department could not, under existing legislation, provide measures to carry out the recommendations of (the (committee. As my right hon. friend will see when I read from the act of 1919, there is this provision:

Section 5 (2) Subject to the approval of the Governor in Council the minister may make such regulations from time to time as he may deem necessary and advisable: for the purpose of carrying out the provisions of this act with respect to any matter placed under the control and management of the minister.

In order to remove all doubt, however, it is deemed necessary to have the present bill. I have already read subsection 2 of section 5 of the Act of 1919. It is now proposed that the subjects as to Which the minister shall have power to make regulations shall be the following:

(gl) For the constitution of medical boards including appeal boards with such powers as may be deemed expedient:-

That is provided for in the report of the committee.

The sheltered employment of ex-members of the forces including after-care of the tuberculous.

That is also a recommendation contained in the report:

The granting of free transportation in Canada to any ex-member of the forces who has been pensioned for total blindness or for a disability which necessitates an escort when travelling:-

That is a special recommendation of the report:

For providing burial expenses for ex-members of the forces who die in destitute circumstances.

That is another recommendation of the report:

For the administration and disposal of canteen funds ;-

That is also provided for in the report:

For the repatriation of ex-members of the forces discharged in England and their dependents and relief for distressed ex-members of the forces in the United Kingdom ;-

That is also a recommendation of the report:

For the treatment of former members of the forces classified as wholy incurable or chronically recurrent cases needing institutional care:-

Soldiers' Re-establishment

That is recommended in the report:

For the provision of measures of unemployment relief to ex-members of the forces and their dependents;-

That is also a recommendation of the report:

And for the payment of compensation in respect of industrial accidents and the return of premiums paid by employers of ex-members of the forces to Workmen's Compensation Boards;-

And then the final provision:

The whole subject to such appropriations as Parliament may provide.

I am sure that my right hon. friend will admit that there is nothing objectionable in these provisions. It is to be regretted that the bill in its present form was not distributed earlier. That, however, is not due to any fault of mine. It was thought by the officers of the department, after consultation with the officials of the Justice Department, that it would be more regular if a special enactment of the House were made in regard to these subjects. The bill was introduced at the time it was in order to expedite matters, so that the measure might be sent over to the Senate for examination there as soon as possible.

Topic:   SOLDIERS' CIVIL RE-ESTABLISHMENT
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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

The bill is a vast improvement on the one introduced yesterday. In fact what the Government introduced yesterday was not a bill at all-it was simply an attempt to legislate a book into law. This, I think, is the right way to attack the subject and in the few seconds that I have had to examine it I do not observe anything very substantial that is objectionable. I do though urge upon the Government that this be the last offence in the way of throwing into the House in the very last two or three days all the important legislation of the session. This session has Ibeen jone long procrastination and at the end one last desperate gulp. I know that it has been the reference of important subjects to committee that has been the means adopted to reach this result, but it should not be done.

In view of the subject with which it deals this legislation certainly should not fail to pass this session. I would think, however, if the Government had any other work we might take it up now and in the meantime a little more detailed study could be given to this hill. I frankly say at once that the method adopted by the present bill, as a result of last nights protest, seems

to be the right one, and in reading over its clauses I have not observed anything which seems to me from a cursory glance to be wrong.

Topic:   SOLDIERS' CIVIL RE-ESTABLISHMENT
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Section agreed to. Bill reported, read the third time anc passed.


PRIVATE BILLS

CONSIDERED IN COMMITTEE-THIRD READINGS


Bill No. 177 (from the Senate), respecting a Patent of Simon W. Farber.-Mr. Chevrier. Bill No. 178 (from the Senate), respecting a Patent of Daniel Herbert Schweyer, [DOT]-Mr. Maclean (Halifax). Bill No. 179 (from the Senate), respecting certain patents of Holophane Glass Company.-Mr. McMaster. Bill No. 180 (from the Senate), for the relief of Margaret Maud Evelyn Clark Leith.-Mr. Euler. Bill No. 181 (from the Senate), for the relief of Mary Ann Phair.-Mr. Church. Bill No. 182 (from the Senate), for the relief of William Park Jefferson.-Mr. Church. Bill No. 183 (from the Senate), for the relief of Eva Maud Ginn.-Mr. Church. Bill No. 184 (from the Senate), for the relief of Louise Janet Maud Bigford.-Mr. Ross (Kingston). Bill No. 185 (from the Senate), for the relief of James Dickson Couch. Mr. Boys. Bill No. 186 (from the Senate), for the relief of Cecil Grenville Bell.-Mr. Maclean (York). Bill No. 189 (from the Senate), for the relief of Nykola Pirozyk.-Mr. Kay. Bill No. 190 (from the Senate), for the relief of Margaret Mary Ivor Horning.- Mr. Bristol. Bill No. 196 (from the Senate), respecting a Patent of the Dominion Chain Company.-Mr. Jacobs.


PROROGATION OF PARLIAMENT


Mr. SPEAKER read a communication from the Acting Governor General's Secretary, announcing that the Right Hon. Sir Louis Davies, K.C.M.G., acting as Deputy of the Governor General, would proceed to the Senate Chamber this evening at 9.30 o'clock, for the purpose of proroguing the present session of Parliament. On motion of Mr. Mackenzie King the House returned to Government Orders. Bankruptcy Act Amendment


BANKRUPTCY ACT AMENDMENT

NON-CONCURRENCE IN SENATE AMENDMENTS


Consideration of amendments made by the Senate to Bill No. 107, to amend the Bank-' ruptcy Act.


LIB

Lomer Gouin (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Liberal

Sir LOMER GOUIN (Minister of Justice) :

Mr. Speaker, I do not think we

should concur in all the amendments proposed by the Senate. I refer especially to clause 12, as we find it in the bill reprinted by the Senate. In the case of corporations which cannot meet their obligations, where arrangements are made between creditors and shareholders for a rearrangement of the shares-for instance, by the cancellation of preferred shares, or the reduction of them to the rank of common shares -clause 12, as we find it in the bill now before us, that is the Senate reprint, provides that a majority of the different classes of shares, first preferred, second preferred or common, may decide, and that the minority shall be governed by the majority. That is to say, if 51 per cent of any of these classes were to accept any scheme, the minority would be bound by such a decision. We think we should give more protection to minorities, and that is why I now propose that we should not concur in the amendment which we have before us, and that instead of leaving the decision to a majority of 51 per cent, we should say that the minority will not be bound by a decision come to by less than 67 per cent of the stock of the different classes. We thus give more protection to the minority.

I would ask the House not to concur in section 14. This amendment offered by the Senate provides that the sale by a trustee of property comprised in any security shall have the same effect as the sale by trustees of property under mortgage. The amendment may be desirable, but I have not had time enough to consider it, and I do not like approving of it without knowing exactly its full effect.

Topic:   BANKRUPTCY ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   NON-CONCURRENCE IN SENATE AMENDMENTS
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CON

Hugh Guthrie

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GUTHRIE:

Is the last section the

only one my hon. friend does not approve

of?

Topic:   BANKRUPTCY ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   NON-CONCURRENCE IN SENATE AMENDMENTS
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LIB

Lomer Gouin (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Liberal

Sir DOMER GOUIN:

The Senate have

made some amendments to section 2 striking out certain words. They take the view that we should retain the law as we have bad it up to now, and while I should have preferred that the amendment which this House made to the act should have been accepted by the Senate, at the same time I understand that if we reject too many of

their amendments we may expose the life of the bill. For that /reason I /would accept their amendment to section 2 rather than lose the bill. I move:

That, as a consequential amendment, section 12 be amended by striking out the word "majority" in line 39 on page 5 of the bill as printed, and substituting therefor the words "two-thirds". And that this House do not agree +o section 14 as inserted in the bill by the Senate, because it destroys the effect of the bill.

Topic:   BANKRUPTCY ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   NON-CONCURRENCE IN SENATE AMENDMENTS
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Motion agreed to.


LIB

Lomer Gouin (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Liberal

Sir LOMER GOUIN (Minister of Justice) moved:

That a message he sent to the Senate ae-quainting their Honours with the non-concurrence of this House in the amendments made by the Senate to Bill No. 107.

Topic:   BANKRUPTCY ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   NON-CONCURRENCE IN SENATE AMENDMENTS
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Motion agreed to.


ORDER IN COUNCIL PRESENTED


Order in Council P. C. 1245, dated 14th June, 1922, authorizing the transfer of radio telegraph service, hydrographic survey, tidal and current survey, the fisheries protection service, from the jurisdiction of the Minister of Naval Affairs to the Minister of Marine and Fisheries.-Hon. Mr. Lapointe.


June 27, 1922