June 17, 1922

PRO

John Evans

Progressive

Mr. EVANS:

It has been my observation for the last thirty years that the advocates of protection have always protested against the importation of United States magazines. I do not believe they take this attitude because of the resulting competition with Canadian periodicals. I will point you back to certain revisions of the tariff, particularly in 1905 and 1906, when they protested most vigorously against the importation of United States magazines, not because of the reading matter which they contained, but because of the advertisements contained in thenj. I am not so sure that my hon. friends to my right have not the same idea in mind now that the protectionists had at that time. As a Canadian I dislike having to hear the suggestion which is brought up so frequently, that Canada is utterly 'helpless to do anything in competition with other nations. It is the competition with these advertisements that some of our people fear, more than the competition of the periodical itself. Now, there are many Canadian magazines and periodicals which are doing very well. We certainly want to cultivate the Canadian national spirit as much as we can, and I do not think it will tend to promote that spirit if we shut out United States magazines, and thus prevent the people of this country from being as well read as possible.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF
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PRO

Thomas Alexander Crerar

Progressive

Mr. CRERAR:

So far as the exclusion of American magazines is concerned, I do not wish at the moment to discuss that point; I understand it is not relevant to the item we are considering. But representations have been made to me by magazine publishers in Canada, particularly by publishers of weekly newspapers, in the matter of securing a reduction of the duty on paper coming from the United States into Canada. I think they have a substantial argument to support their contention in that respect. Advertising houses which run advertisements in United States and Canadian publications place the Canadian publisher at a disadvantage: while there is no duty on the advertising coming

into Canada, there is a duty, and a pretty stiff one, on the paper coming into Canada that is necessary for these Canadian publications. Our Canadian paper mills did very well during the years of the war and are to-day in a prosperous condition; the fact that practically 85 per cent of their product is exported is, I think, a pretty fair evidence of their prosperity. I would urge upon the minister the making of some reduction in the duties on this particular class of paper and thus affording much needed relief to Canadian publishers. I see no reason why that should not be done, and I trust that the Minister of Finance will give the matter consideration.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF
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IND

William Charles Good

Independent Progressive

Mr. GOOD:

I have a friend in the printing business who tells me that he buys a great deal of paper from the other side, on which he pays a duty of 30 per cent, or whatever it may be. It may not be just the class of paper under consideration, but it seems to me that the suggestion made by the hon. member for Marquette (Mr. Crear) is certainly' worth considering-that we should cut down the duty on American paper. A very large protection is undoubtedly given to the Canadian manufacturer at present, and it would make it very much easier for all our publishers if that duty were reduced. I would submit to the minister that the duty were cut down from 35 to 25 per cent, we might get just as much revenue, possibly more than we are getting now under the very high duty of 35 per cent. I hope the Government will consider a reduction in the duty on this particular item.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF
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PRO

Alan Webster Neill

Progressive

Mr. NEILL:

I hope, that in that connection the Minister of Finance will remember that four of the six paper manufacturing mills in my district are idle today for lack of business.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF
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LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. FIELDING:

I have no doubt a fair argument could be made for reduction of duty on several particular items, but I have to fall back on our attitude towards the United States. I think it is sound policy for the present, except in urgent cases, in the slang of the day, to " stand pat " on the tariff question until we see what our American friends are going to do. At all events, that is the ground we have taken with regard to the American tariff generally.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF
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Item agreed to. Paper milk bottle caps, printed or not: British Preferential tariff, 15 p.c.; Intermediate tariff, 25 p.c.; General tariff, 274 p.c. Customs Tariff


CON

Henry Lumley Drayton

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir HENRY DRAYTON:

What was the former tariff?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF
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LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. FIELDING:

It was 221, 32 and 35. We have made a considerable reduction.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF
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PRO

John Alexander Wallace

Progressive

Mr. WALLACE:

To what extent are these milk bottle caps imported? What is the percentage as compared with the home manufactured article?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF
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LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. FIELDING:

The figures are not classified in such a way that I can answer that question. The imports have not been very large because the rates have been very high. There will probably be some imports now. The effect of all these reductions will be to encourage some imports, I hope not at the expense of the home industry. With the general improvement of trade, I hope both will benefit.

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Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF
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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

Does the minister

really think that a reduction in the duty on milk bottle caps is going to increase the dairy business so that whatever reduction may be made in local purchases of the same article will be more than made up for by the increase in the dairy business? Surely he does not think, even though this reduction does result in a lower price for milk bottle caps, that that is going to be reflected in any increase in the dairying industry of Canada. The suggestion is ludicrous.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF
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LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. FIELDING:

Anything that will

lighten the burdens on the dairying industry will encourage and help that industry. That is a fair proposition generally. My observation and experience are that a moderate tariff very often gives you as much revenue, or more, than a higher rate of duty. My experience under the Liberal administration was that such reductions did not diminish the general business of the country, but rather helped it.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF
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CON

Henry Lumley Drayton

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir HENRY DRAYTON:

That opens up a pretty large field. What are these milk bottle caps worth to the dairyman? What is the percentage of cost?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF
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LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. FIELDING:

I am afraid I could not give that.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF
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CON

Henry Lumley Drayton

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir HENRY DRAYTON:

It is infinitesimal.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF
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LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. FIELDING:

I hope my hon. friend will tell the manufacturer it is infinitesimal.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF
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CON

Henry Lumley Drayton

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir HENRY DRAYTON:

It is infinitesimal so far as any reduction to the public is concerned.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF
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LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. FIELDING:

It works only one way, does it?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF
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Item agreed to. Boracic acid and borax in packages of not less than twenty-five pounds weight; hydro-fluosilicic acid; oxalic acid; tannic acid; ammonia, sulphate of; sal ammoniac and nitrate of ammonia ; cyanide of potassium; cyanide of sodium and cyanogen bromide; antimony salts, viz.:-tartar emetic, chlorine and lactate (an-timonine) ; arsenous oxide; oxide of cobalt; oxide of tin; bichloride of tin; tin crystals; oxide of copper; precipitate of copper, crude; sulphate of copper (blue vitriol) ; verdigris or subacetate of copper, dry; sulphate of iron (copperas) ; sulphate of zinc; chloride of zinc; sulphur and brimstone, crude or in roll or flour; cream of tartar, in crystals or argols; tartaric acid crystals, iodine, crude; bromine; phosphorus ; sulphide of arsenic; carbon bisulphide: British Preferential tariff, free; Intermediate tariff, free ; General tariff, free.


CON

Henry Lumley Drayton

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir HENRY DRAYTON:

The whole of this item is unnecessary except that it adds three articles to the former free list, cyanide of sodium, cyanogen bromide-

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF
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June 17, 1922