June 17, 1922

IMMIGRATION-CRIMINAL CODE

LAB

James Shaver Woodsworth

Labour

Mr. J. S. WOODSWORTH (Centre Winnipeg):

When may we expect a report from the special committee appointed to deal with amendments to the Immigration Act and the Criminal Code? These bills were introduced at the very beginning of the session, and we have not yet had any report.

Topic:   IMMIGRATION-CRIMINAL CODE
Permalink
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I do not see the chairman of the committee in the House, but I am informed there is a notice in the Votes and Proceedings that a motion will be made on Monday.

Topic:   IMMIGRATION-CRIMINAL CODE
Permalink

ORIENTAL IMMIGRATION

CON

William Garland McQuarrie

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. W. G. McQUARRIE (New Westminster) :

May I be permittted to ask the

Prime Minister if he will make an announcement before the House prorogues as to the Government's policy regarding the effective restriction of oriental immigration, and also as to the result of his negotiations with the Chinese Ambassador, who was lately in Ottawa, and with the Japanese Consul General?

Topic:   ORIENTAL IMMIGRATION
Permalink
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I may answer my hon. friend at once that the policy of the Government is to bring about effective restriction. As these negotiations have not yet been concluded, I doubt whether it will be possible to make an announcement to the House before the session is over.

Topic:   ORIENTAL IMMIGRATION
Permalink

CANADIAN GOVERNMENT MERCHANT MARINE


On the Orders of the Day:


LIB

Samuel William Jacobs

Liberal

Mr. S. W. JACOBS (George Etienne Cartier) :

A newspaper despatch announced last night that there is a well founded rumour in London that the vessels of the merchant marine have been offered for sale on the London market to British interests.

I hope the good news is true. Can the Government give us any information?

Topic:   CANADIAN GOVERNMENT MERCHANT MARINE
Permalink
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I imagine it is a newspaper report.

Topic:   CANADIAN GOVERNMENT MERCHANT MARINE
Permalink
LIB
CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

I have no doubt it would be good news to many private interests.

Topic:   CANADIAN GOVERNMENT MERCHANT MARINE
Permalink

WAYS AND MEANS

CUSTOMS TARIFF


The House in Committee of Ways and Means.-Mr. Gordon in the Chair. X. Resolved, That The Customs Tariff, 1907, be amended by repealing Section 12A, added : thereto by Section 5 of The Customs Tariff Amendment Act, 1921, and by inserting in place thereof the following Section:- 12A. The Governor in Council may from time to time as he deems it expedient, order that goods of any description or class specified in such order, imported into Canada, shall be marked, stamped, branded or labelled in legible English or French words, in a conspicuous place that shall not be covered or obscured by any subsequent attachments or arrangements, so as to indicate the country of origin. Said marking, stamping, branding or labelling shall be as nearly indelible and permanent as the nature of the goods will permit. All orders made by the Governor in Council under this Section shall have effect from and after the day on which the same are published in The Canada Gazette, or from and after such later day as is appointed for the purpose in such Customs Tariff orders, and during such time as is therein expressed, or if no time is expressed for that purpose, then until the same art revoked or altered. Provided that all such goods imported into Canada after the date of the coming into force of any such order of the Governor in Council which do not comply with the requirements of such order, shall he subject to an additional duty of ten per centum ad valorem to he levied on the value for duty purposes, and in addition such goods shall not he released from Customs possession until they have been so marked, stamped, branded or labelled under Customs supervision at the expense of the importer. Provided further that if any person shall violate any of the provisions so established relating to the marking, stamping, branding or labelling of any such imported goods, or shall deface, destroy, remove, alter, or obliterate any such marks, stamps, brands or labels, with intent to conceal the information given by or contained in such marks, stamps, brands or labels, he shall be liable on summary conviction tp a penalty not exceeding one thousand dollars, or to imprisonment not exceeding one year, or to both fine and imprisonment. The Minister of Customs and Excise may make such regulations as are deemed necessary for carrying out the provisions of this Section and for the enforcement thereof.


LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. FIELDING:

This is the resolution which repeals the Marking Act as a general law, and authorizes the Governor in Council to deal with the matter under exceptional conditions.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF
Permalink
CON

Henry Lumley Drayton

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir HENRY DRAYTON:

I wonder if the minister has taken cognizance of the fact that the United States have a Marking Act practically the same as our old Marking Act, and that Canadian products have from time to time been held up under that act? If the hon. gentleman has taken cognizance of that, I should like to know on what principle he proposes to administer the power given to the Government to put into force what is really the old act, because, after all, the new law recognizes the advisability and desirability, nay, the necessity, of marking at the present time, but leaves it to the discretion of the Government to say what shall be marked, instead of leaving it to the Government to make special exceptions where marking is not convenient. I rise for the purpose of ascertaining, first, the view of the Government as to the American legislation, and, second, the underlying principle upon which these new regulations will be administered.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF
Permalink
LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. FIELDING:

There is, I understand, an act of that character in operation in the United States, and I have no doubt it could readily be made very embarrassing. This resolution simply repeals the Marking

Act as it was passed last year, and restricts it to particular cases which may be determined by the Governor in Council. It has been found by experience that the Marking Act is an exceedingly difficult thing to administer. My hon. friend found it so, because the act was passed and a date, fixed for its coming into operation, and he had to postpone its coming into operation until a further time, and did not apply the act. That must have shown him that there were great difficulties in the way. Difficulties might readily exist in enforcing a law which was to be applied generally which would not exist in the case of a law which was to be applied to particular cases that might arise, so instead of having a general Marking Act applied to products generally, which undoubtedly was difficult, embarrassing, and inconvenient, we are taking power to deal with certain exceptional cases that may arise. That is the principle upon which we are working.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF
Permalink
CON

Henry Lumley Drayton

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir HENRY DRAYTON:

That hardly

answers my question. I freely admit that there are difficulties in looking after any new regulations. No matter how beneficial a regulation may be, one has to recognize special conditions and make modifications. I think that last year we had covered a very large number of special conditions and were practically in a position to enforce the law without hardship. What I want to find out now is, the principle on which the Government is going to apply these regulations. The hon. minister says, " in special cases." What is a "special" case? Is the underlying principle the idea that the Canadian public ought to have knowledge of whose goods they are buying? Is the underlying principle to give effect to the spirit of the act in all cases where it can be shown that no damage to the goods will result from the marking? Or is it the idea that there are to be special cases, with special pressure, and some special considerations each time? What is the principle?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF
Permalink
LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. FIELDING:

There is no principle, implied or suggested, extending any special favours. The principle is that if you have a disagreeable thing to do you had1 better not do too much of it. That in itself is a good, sound principle. In the application of this act what my hon. friend proposed was found to be practically impossible; he worked out regulations and found that it could not be done. What we propose is

Customs Tariff

this:Instead of applying the general law and disturbing trade generally, we will deal with any particular case that is brought before us. I really do not think I can make my explanation any clearer. There is no doubt that the principle of this act involved a threat; at all events the fact that the act was to come into operation was a cause of annoyance and irritation to the business men of the community. My hon. friend must have been aware of that, I am sure he had representations along that line, and it is an undoubted fact that the Marking Act was intended to make importation more difficult. Someone has said-perhaps unkindly-in the recent debate that the act was intended to make importation difficult, and practically was a measure to increase the protection, and I am not sure but that such was the tenor, or at all events, the purpose of the act. If our manufacturers in Canada wish to be protected as respects their own brand the thought just came to me "Why do they not mark their goods 'Made in Canada'?" That is simple, they can do that easily enough. If we cannot exercise control in the marking of foreign goods, we can control the marking of our own goods made in Canada. If the mark made in Canada is a good mark, and I hope it is, and one that we ought to be proud of, I w'ould suggest that our Canadian manufacturers mark their goods "Made in Canada." Then we will know that any article not so branded is imported, and in that way we will be able to protect the home manufacturer when his brand is a good one. I think there is merit in the suggestion. However, so far as the principal aim of the act is concerned I regret that I do not think I can make it clearer to my hon. friend.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF
Permalink

June 17, 1922