June 16, 1922

CON

Leon Johnson Ladner

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. LADNER:

Does not the minister think it a mistake to vest authority in at inspector to close a cannery if in his judgment it is not in a sanitary condition? As those who are familiar with the canning business are aware, the pack is put out during a period of four or five weeks, when a cannery will pack perhaps a hundred thousand cases. It seems to me that the

Meat and Canned Foods

public can 'be very easily protected by our providing for inspection of the pack after it has been put up. These inspectors are only human, they are not very highly paid, and it seems to me that this is altogether too great authority to put in their hands. Has the minister consulted with the canning interests in British Columbia in respect to this matter?

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LIB

Ernest Lapointe (Minister of Marine and Fisheries)

Liberal

Mr. LAPOINTE:

Yes, Mr. Chairman, and the canners themselves agree to this provision, which is necessary if the law is to be properly enforced; otherwise, too long d'elays are involved and the unsanitary conditions continue.

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CON

Leon Johnson Ladner

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. LADNER:

Is the Canners' Association in British Columbia recommending this change?

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LIB

Ernest Lapointe (Minister of Marine and Fisheries)

Liberal

Mr. LAPOINTE :

This bill was submitted to the salmon canners of British Columbia, ar.d they themselves suggested some of the provisions which we have embodied. We also submitted the bill to the canners in the maritime provinces, and this embodies their wishes. i

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LIB

Charles Marcil

Liberal

Mr. MARCIL (Bonaventure) :

I think the canners can be relied on to look after their own interests. The public are being protected in this case. As the hon. member for Lunenburg( Mr. Duff) says, when a can cf fish is brought home the label is torn off, the can is placed in boiling water, and if something happens after the contents are eaten it is almost impossible to discover the name of the packers.

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LIB

Ernest Lapointe (Minister of Marine and Fisheries)

Liberal

Mr. LAPOINTE:

We are trying to prevent that condition of things, and we are making the law more severe.

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CON

Leon Johnson Ladner

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. LADNER:

I hope the minister understands the point I am trying to make clear. It is not a question of cans or labels referred to by the hon. member for Bonaventure. Suppose a cannery is in the midst of a large pack, with fifteen thousand to twenty thousand salmon in scows and on the Wharf, and an inspector finds certain unsanitary conditions, does the minister realize the power which that inspector is given to immediately stop operations? ,

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LIB

William Duff

Liberal

Mr. DUFF:

Whose hands would the hon. member place the power in if not in the inspector's? Who else is there to see that the cannery is in proper condition?

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LIB

Ernest Lapointe (Minister of Marine and Fisheries)

Liberal

Mr. LAPOINTE:

May I say to my hon. friend from Vancouver South (Mr. Ladner)

that it is in the interests of the canners themselves that these provisions should be made as stringent as they are. The canning industry is a very important one in this country and our goods enjoy a very high standing in all the markets of the world. Consequently our packers are anxious to preserve their reputation and to prevent people injuring it who are careless about observing the requirements which the bonafide canners do live up to.

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PRO

John Livingstone Brown

Progressive

Mr. BROWN:

The hon. member for Lunenburg has indicated that there are some insuperable difficulties1 in having the packers' names stamped on the cans. Would he briefly indicate these difficulties?

,Mr. DUFF: These cans are made in factories from long sheets of tin, and it is impossible to imprint the names and addresses of the various packers of the cans.

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PRO

John Livingstone Brown

Progressive

Mr. BROWN:

Would it not be quite

feasible to do that in the factory where the goods are packed?

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LIB

William Duff

Liberal

Mr. DUFF:

But the cans are made in

the factory from long sheets of tin, and it is not feasible to put the name of the packer on the can itself, so a label is pasted on. If you stamp these cans you are likely to make holes and the contents could not be preserved.

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LIB

James Joseph Hughes

Liberal

Mr. HUGHES:

There is another reason : there are only a few manufacturers of cans, but there are a great many packers. How could the manufacturer imprint or emboss the name of the packer on the cans when he does not know who is going to buy them?

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PRO

John Livingstone Brown

Progressive

Mr. BROWN:

I still think it might be

possible to put a mark on the can that would not be destroyed when the can is put in boiling water.

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LIB

James Joseph Hughes

Liberal

Mr. HUGHES:

How would that indicate the packer when there are so many engaged in the business? It is impossible.

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PRO
PRO

Arthur John Lewis

Progressive

Mr. LEWIS:

I do not think it is impossible at all. It might be impossible in regard to the body of the can-I know something about tin work-but the lids are stamped with a ring to increase their strength, and when that is being done certain letters could be imprinted.

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LIB
PRO
LIB

June 16, 1922