June 16, 1922

CURRENCY ACT, 1910, AMENDMENT


On motion of Hon. W. S. Fielding (Minister of Finance) the House went into committee to consider the following proposed resolution, Mr. Gordon in the Chair: Resolved, That it is expedient to amend the Schedule to The Currency Act, 1910, as amended by chapter nine of the statutes of 1920, by changing the millesimal fineness of silver coins from 4 to 6, and by providing that this enactment shall apply to silver coins heretofore struck since the first day of January, 1920, and also to amend the said Schedule, as amended by chapter six of the statutes of 1921, by striking out the millesimal fineness of nickel five cent coins.


LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. FIELDING:

This resolution has for its object the enactment of a bill which is desired by the authorities of the Mint. Under the act respecting the currency our silver coins are required to have a certain standard of fineness; out of every 1,000 parts 800 are required to be of pure silver.

Agricultural Fertilizers

That, in the language of the Mint, is called a "remedy"; for the sake of convenience I will call it the margin of safety. That margin of safety is at present fixed at 4 points; that is to say, if there should be a departure of more than 4 points from the standard, the currency would not be lawful. It has been found, in the experience of the Mint, that this limitation, though they have not in any case violated it, is a rather severe one, and they ask that the margin be made 6 points instead of 4. Once a year there is a test of the coins made, which is known as the trial of the Pyx, and if these coins do not conform exactly to the standard there would be a very embarrassing situation. While no coins have been cast which do not conform with the existing law, the authorities of the Mint think that in the interests of safety they should have a little larger margin, and therefore it is proposed to change the "remedy" from 4 to 6.

The second part of the resolution refers to the nickel currency. In the act as it now stands, there is provision for a certain standard of nickel. It was rather a mistake to introduce that, I think. The nickel is not looked upon as valuable as a metal. The nickel coin is merely a token; it is not esteemed for its intrinsic value but what it stands for. So it is proposed that there shall be no "remedy" needed in the case of the nickel coin, and there is no need to fix a margin of safety as in the case of the silver coin.

Resolution reported, read the second time and concurred in.

Mr. FIELDING thereupon moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 147 to amend the Currency Act.

Topic:   CURRENCY ACT, 1910, AMENDMENT
Permalink

Motion agreed to, bill read the first and second time, considered in committee, reported, read the third time and passed.


PENNY BANK ACT AMENDMENT


On motion of Hon. W. S. Fielding (Minister of Finance) the House went into committee to consider the following proposed resolution, Mr. Gordon in the Chair. Resolved, That it is expedient to amend the Penny Bank Act, chapter thirty-one of the Revised Statutes of Canada, by providing that a proportion not exceeding one-half of such moneys as are received on deposit elsewhere than at the place where the chief office of the bank is situated may he deposited by the bank in such chartered banks or other financial institutions as the Minister of Finance may designate as depositaries, and to provide for withdrawals from such depositaries. 195J


LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. FIELDING:

This resolution is to to be the basis of a bill which has been requested by the gentlemen interested in the Penny Bank established at Toronto. The object is to allow the bank to enlarge its sphere of operations, and in the case of any places outside of Toronto in which it may engage to do business, to retain a certain amount of its deposits on hand. It is a bill introduced entirely at their request. The bank, I think, has been satisfactory in its operations, and I imagine there is no objection to what they are asking.

Topic:   PENNY BANK ACT AMENDMENT
Permalink
CON

Henry Lumley Drayton

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir HENRY DRAYTON:

I would think that perhaps any discussion we have on this should take place in committee on the bill. It is a matter of importance which we ought to consider, and I think we should hear at greater length from the minister, when the bill is under consideration.

Topic:   PENNY BANK ACT AMENDMENT
Permalink
LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. FIELDING:

I am very glad to accept the suggestion of my hon. friend. We can pass the resolution, and the bill can stand for further consideration.

Resolution reported, read the second time and concurred in.

Mr. FIELDING thereupon moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 148 to amend the Penny Bank Act.

Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.

Topic:   PENNY BANK ACT AMENDMENT
Permalink

AGRICULTURAL FERTILIZERS


On motion of Hon. W. R. Motherwell (Minister of Agriculture) the House went into committee to consider the following proposed resolution, Mr. Gordon in the Chair. Resolved, That it is expedient to bring in a measure to regulate the sale of Agricultural Fertilizers, and to repeal The Fertilizers Act, 1909, chapter 16 of the statutes of 1909, and An Act to amend The Fertilizers Act, 1909, chapter 20 of the statutes of 1919, and to provide:- 1. That no person shall manufacture or import any fertilizer to be solid, offered or held for sale in Canada unless each brand is registered with the Minister and a registration number assigned to it, and application for registration must he made by the manufacturer or importer in such form as the Minister prescribes, and must be accompanied by a registration fee of ten dollars or twenty dollars or thirty dollars for each brand registered, according as it contains one, two or three of the following substances, that is to say, nitrogen, phosphoric acid and potash. 2. That the assignment of a registration number shall of itself authorize the sale of a fertilizer for the period continuing until the first day of July following the date upon which it is granted but such registration may he renewed Agricultural Fertilizers



from year to year and the same registration number may be assigned to the fertilizer provided no change is made in the brand name, guaranteed analysis, materials from which it is made or the fineness thereof. 3. That the fees for a renewal of a registration shall be the same as those for the original registration. 4. That provision be made prescribing the particulars to be stated in every application for a registration number, and the conditions under which the Minister may refuse to register any fertilizer or cancel any registration. 5. That no person shall sell, offer, expose or hold for sale in Canada any fertilizer unless each package containing the fertilizer, or a tag or label durably attached thereto, or if in bulk, the invoice of sale, is branded or marked in printed characters with the name and address of the manufacturers or importer, the brand name, the guaranteed analysis and other particulars as prescribed. 6. That no person shall sell, offer, expose or hold for sale in Canada any material purported to be a fertilizer, or any fertilizer except basis slag or natural rock phosphate, unless it contains not less than two per cent of nitrogen or five per cent of available phosphoric, acid or two per cent of potash soluble in water, and not less than a total of twelve per cent of nitrogen, available phosphoric acid or potash soluble in water. 7. That no person shall sell, offer, expose or hold for sale in Canada any fertilizer which contains more than one-tenth of one per cent anhydrous borax or any other constituent poisonous to plant life when applied to the soil. 8. That these provisions shall not apply (a) to fertilizers which are manufactured and sold on a prescription received by. the manufacturer in writing from a purchaser who states therein that such fertilizer is not intended for sale, unless such fertilizers are actually again sold, or (b) to the selling or offering for sale of fertilizers for manufacturing purposes. 9. That provision be made for the appointment of an advisory board to recommend regulations, and to give the minister power to make regulations, and for the analysis of fer_ tilizers, and the appointment and powers of inspectors, and such other enactments as are necessary to enforce the proposed measure. 10. That the act to be based upon these resolutions shall come into operation on such date as may be prescribed by proclamation of the Governor in Council.


LIB

William Richard Motherwell (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. MOTHERWELL:

A bill to consolidate and amend the present Fertilizer Act will be founded on this resolution. We are proposing a consolidation of the present law and will endeavour at the same time to bring it up to date, with respect to certain matters which will be fully dealt with in the bill itself. In order to save time I would suggest that the committee adopt this resolution, after which the bill itself can be introduced and referred to the Committee on Agriculture where its provisions can be thoroughly inquired into.

Resolution reported, read the second time and concurred in. Mr. Motherwell

thereupon moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 149, to regulate the sale of Agricultural Fertilizers.

Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.

Topic:   AGRICULTURAL FERTILIZERS
Permalink
CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

Is it not intended to refer this bill to the Committee on Agriculture ?

Topic:   AGRICULTURAL FERTILIZERS
Permalink
LIB
LIB
LIB

William Richard Motherwell (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. MOTHERWELL:

I move that the bill be now read a second time and referred to the Select Standing Committee on Agriculture and Colonization.

Topic:   AGRICULTURAL FERTILIZERS
Permalink

Motion agreed to.


MEAT AND CANNED FOODS


On motion of Hon. E. Lapointe, (Minister of Marine and Fisheries) the House went into committee to consider the following proposed resolution.-Mr. Gordon in the Chair. Resolved, that It is expedient to amend The Meat and Canned Foods Act, chapter twenty-seven of the statutes of 1907, and amending Acts, and to provide:- 1. (a) That "shell fish" may be included among the products prepared for food for export or stored for export in an establishment as defined in section one of chapter 31 of the statutes of 1918 ; (b) That "dry lobster meat" or "dry meat" shall mean drained meat, that is, the meat remaining after a can which has been processed and allowed to cool thoroughly is opened and upturned so as to permit free drainage of the liquid therefrom for not less than one minute and not more than one and a half minutes; and, (c) That " cam " and " canned fish or shellfish " shall include any hermetically sealed glass bottle, package or container, and any fish or shellfish processed or preserved in the usual way packed in such can, bottle, package or container. 2. That section 12A, as enacted by chapter 33 of the statutes of 1917, be amended to provide that fish and shellfish packed in cans shall be subject to inspection! such as may be provided by the regulations during the whole course of preparation and packing, and at any time thereafter at the cannery or at the warehouse of the first purchaser at his request, and shall be labelled with the particulars as prescribed therein, with the name and address of the packer or of the first dealer obtaining it direct from the packer. 3. That subsection 4 of the said section 12A be amended to provide that exemption from labelling of the cans of fish or shellfish may be allowed, if such labelling hinders the sale of the same in markets outside of Canada. 4. That section 12C of the said Act be" amended to provide that all canned fish and shellfish shall be sound, wholesome and fit for Meat and Canned Foods human food, and any unsound canned fish or shellfish found during the process of preparing and packing or at any time thereafter, at the cannery or the warehouse of the first purchaser, may he seized and confiscated on view by any inspecting offioer and dealt with as provided by the regulations, and the inspector may take samples for inspection. 5. That section 12D of the said Act as enacted by chapter 22 of the statutes of 1919 (second session) be amended to provide that there shall be five sizes of cans for canning lobsters. These shall be of the sizes commonly known as three, six, mine, twelve and sixteen ounce cans. The cans of each size in the order named shall each contain not less than three ounces avoirdupois, Six ounces avoirdupois, nine ounces avoirdupois, twelve ounces avoirdupois, and sixteen ounces avoirdupois of drained lobster meat. No other size of can shall be used for [packing lobsters, without first obtaining the written permission of the minister. Such written permission shall state the minimum amount of drained lobster meat each size of can so authorized shall contain. All cans that do not contain the weight specified for each of the sizes herein named, or that may be hereafter named may be seized and held by any inspecting officer and disposed of as provided by the regulations. 6. That section 12E of the said Act as en-aoted by chapter 33 of the statutes of 1917 be amended to provide that for the purposes of the Act, the varieties of British Columbia salmon shall be designated, and, provided the need for such is established to the satisfaction of the Governor in Council, graded as provided in the regulations. 7. That seotion 12F of the said Act as enacted by the said chapter be amended to provide that in the event of the provisions of the Act or of any regulation made thereunder or the lawful instructions of inspecting officers not being compiled with in any fish or shellfish cannery, the minister may order the fish or shellfish cannery to be closed; provided, however, that any cannery in which the sanitary conditions are being neglected may be immediately closed by the inspecting officer until the defects are remedied. 8. That the provisions of section 1-2G as enacted by the said chapter relating to the exportation of fish not canned in accordance with law be repealed. 9. That the provisions of seotion 12H as enacted by chapter 22 of the statutes of 1919 (second session) be amended to provide that canned fish or canned shellfish inported into Canada to be exported again need only be labelled to show the country of origin; and no false or misleading mark or designation of the kind or variety of the contents shall be shown on any can of fish or shellfish imported for sale in Canada.


June 16, 1922