June 9, 1922

CON

Simon Fraser Tolmie

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. TOLMIE :

In making a valuation of the diseased animal we must not forget to ask ourselves what a glandered horse is worth, what a pure bred cow with tuberculosis is worth, and What a hog with cholera is worth.

Topic:   ANIMAL CONTAGIOUS DISEASES ACT AMENDMENT
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PRO

John Millar

Progressive

Mr. MILLAR:

Is there any provision

in this legislation for an appeal in case the owner of the animal is not satisfied?

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LIB

William Richard Motherwell (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. MOTHERWELL:

No. There is an appeal to the court from the Inspector s decision as to whether the animals were diseased or not, but no appeal as to amount, and, invariably, the appeals have not been sustained by the court. In other words, the courts have sustained the decision of the inspector. There is nothing compelling the owners to come under this act. It is not necessary to have your animals examined. If you are supplying milk to certain cities that come under this system of certified milk, then you must apply for inspection. In other respects, it is voluntary. Therefore, knowing the compensation, there is no grievance. As a matter of fact, hundreds of cattle were slaughtered before this was adopted, and the owner received no compensation, but anyone familiar with this matter knows that there is a general tendency, whether it be tuberculosis in the human family or in the bovine family, that there is a tendency to hide it, even from oneself, and simply go on with your eyes shut and try to convince yourself even against the evidence that you have not the malady. Where there is a big prospective loss, like this, the compensation encourages a man whether he is poor or in moderate circumstances. He feels there is somebody ready to help him in the event of the worst coming to the worst. The idea is not to purchase the animal, but simply to indemnify him, to a certain extent, and to safeguard his animals by inspection. What is the situation now? The fact that we have 150 odd herds waiting to be inspected shows that the public are clamouring for it faster than we can get the men and money to carry it out. If we gave more money, we would be wasting it, so far as the public treasury is concerned. And, furthermore, it would encourage the man, and give him a sense of security, because he is going to get nearly the value of the animal, and, perhaps, he would not be half as careful, in regard to the animal contracting disease. I know about it, because I had my herd examined and slaughtered. Unless a man is a loser to some extent, he will not have the same care

Animal Contagious Diseases

in regard to his herd, especially if it is a valuable herd. You must clean up your premises and get your animals inspected, and it must be done continuously, if you are to keep your herd clean.

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PRO
LIB
PRO
LIB

William Richard Motherwell (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. MOTHERWELL:

No, any inspection done by the Government is free.

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PRO

Robert Milton Johnson

Progressive

Mr. JOHNSON (Moosejaw) :

In tha

case of glanders in horses, does the minister say there is no complusion on the part of the owners to have the animals inspected and slaughtered, if it comes to the ears of the authorities?

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LIB

William Richard Motherwell (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. MOTHERWELL:

Unless you are near to a city or a community-

Topic:   ANIMAL CONTAGIOUS DISEASES ACT AMENDMENT
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PRO

Robert Milton Johnson

Progressive

Mr. JOHNSON:

Suppose it is a horse that is inflicted with glanders?

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PRO

Thomas Wakem Caldwell

Progressive

Mr. CALDWELL:

I think, if there is a complaint made, these horses must be slaughtered. In our district, in a rural community, complaint was made and the horses were tested and slaughtered. What standard has the department to determine whether a pure-bred cow is a 100 per cent cow, or up to the perfect standard? What standard have you to gauge them? Do they have to make 30 pounds of butter a week, or what is the standard?

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LIB

William Richard Motherwell (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. MOTHERWELL:

Just the same standard as the judge would have. I do not care whether they have a score card or not, but my hon. friend is sufficiently familiar with it, and he would size up the cow. First it is the pure-bred cow. That would be one thing that would give it a value. That is a different class altogether. Then you would certainly look at the pedigree. The inspector would call for the pedigree, and it would have to be forthcoming before he would go into that class at all, and the age of the animal would be determined, if not by the rings on the horn, then by the pedigree.

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PRO
LIB

William Richard Motherwell (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. MOTHERWELL:

There is a number of things about animals the inspector could not determine on a cursory examination,-how safe she was, as a breeder, what her progeny was, and all that sort of thing. It would entail a rather minute

examination, but I think a competent inspector will get approximately near the mark.

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PRO

Donald MacBeth Kennedy

Progressive

Mr. KENNEDY (Glengarry) :

What is the maximum compensation?

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LIB

William Richard Motherwell (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. MOTHERWELL:

One hundred

dollars.

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PRO

Robert Milton Johnson

Progressive

Mr. JOHNSON:

In the case of glanders in horses and hog cholera in swine, I am informed that if is compulsory.

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LIB
PRO

Robert Milton Johnson

Progressive

Mr. JOHNSON:

In that case, is there no appeal against the valuation of the inspector?

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LIB

William Richard Motherwell (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. MOTHERWELL:

No, and I hope

there never will be. Somebody's judgment has got to prevail, and quite frequently without any appeal, and, if there is dissatisfaction, a new man is put on the job, and there is a second inspection.

Topic:   ANIMAL CONTAGIOUS DISEASES ACT AMENDMENT
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June 9, 1922