June 8, 1922

QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk).


MILITIA-TEN TEARS SERVICE

LIB

Hermas Deslauriers

Liberal

Mr. DESLAURIERS:

How many members of the permanent Militia force, having served ten years or more, left the service between November 11th, 1918, and July 1st, 1919.

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LIB

George Perry Graham (Minister of Militia and Defence; Minister of the Naval Service)

Liberal

Hon. Mr. GRAHAM:

Seventy-two.

CANADIAN MERCHANT MARINE Mr. ARCHAMBAULT:

1. How many ships of the Canadian Merchant Marine are actually in the Montreal harbour?

2. What are the names of said ships?

3. Are they out of commission or are they to be loaded with freight for a carrying trip?

4. If the said ships are to be commissioned (a) where are they going, (b) when will they sail, (c) what freight revenue will be received from each, and (d) what are the total expenses of each voyage?

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PRO

Hon. Mr. KENNEDY:

Progressive

1. Six.

2. Canadian Harvester, Beaver, Carrier, Runner, Ranger and Rancher.

3. In a commission, with the exception of the last-named two.

4. (a) Harvester and Beaver, British West Indies; Carrier, Glasgow; Runner, Cardiff and Swansea. (b) Beaver, June 8; Carrier, June 17; Harvester and Runner, June 21. (c) and (d) Tin ;e questions are impossible of answer at this time.

RETURNED SOLDIERS On the Orders of the Day:

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IND

William Findlay Maclean

Independent Conservative

Mr. W. F. MACLEAN (South York) :

Mr. Speaker, before the Orders of the Day are called I wish to ask a question of the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King). As one of the nine representatives of the Toronto and suburban ridings I have received during the last day or two many pressing telegrams from various organizations of returned men asking that at the earliest possible date the Government will announce their policy for dealing with the claims of returned men.

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister) :

As my hon. friend is aware, the whole subject of what it may be most advisable to do in respect to the representations presented by the returned men is being considered by a committee of this House which was appointed for that purpose. I am informed by the chairman of that committee that he anticipates the report will be ready very shortly. As soon as it is brought down the Government will be in a position to make a statement as to its policy.

PRIVILEGE-MR. CRERAR On the Orders of the Day:

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PRO

Thomas Alexander Crerar

Progressive

Hon. T. A. CRERAR (Marquette) :

Mr. Speaker, I wish to rise to a question of privilege in regard to some remarks made by my ihon. friend from Lincoln (Mr. Chaplin) last night when addressing the House.

Privilege-Mr. Crerar

He brought into question some figures that I had used when I addressed the House last Monday as to the character of our exports.

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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. ARTHUR MEIGHEN (Leader of the Opposition) :

I rise to a point of order, Mr. Speaker. I do not think the hon. member has a right to any special privilege on the Orders of the Day in relation to the budget debate.

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PRO

Thomas Alexander Crerar

Progressive

Mr. CRERAR:

I submit, Mr. Speaker, that I have a right to correct a wrong impression that my hon. friend from Lincoln, unwittingly, I believe, gave the House.

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LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

I think the hon. gentleman is in order. If he was misquoted or misrepresented, he has a right as member of the House to state the facts as he understands them.

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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

If an hon. member has a right on the Orders of the Day to correct impressions that he believes are erroneous coming from another speaker in a current debate, I think I could occupy the Orders of the Day for several hours each day.

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PRO

Thomas Alexander Crerar

Progressive

Mr. CRERAR:

My hon. friend from Lincoln last night said that in the statement I had made I had padded the returns; and in another part of his speech he made use of the following language: "I think hon. members would like to know what the object is in deceiving the House." I submit, Mr. Speaker, that I have a right to draw the attention of the House to these remarks, and to state that the figures I gave were supplied me by the Bureau of Statistics. I think it probable that in those figures, under the title "vegetable products" some of the articles my hon. friend mentioned were included.

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CON
PRO

Thomas Alexander Crerar

Progressive

Mr. CRERAR:

No, my hon. friend is not quite correct. But aside from that, I merely wish to assure the House, Mr. Speaker, that nothing was further from my mind than to convey a wrong impression, and therefore I give the House the authority for the statement I made.

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LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

In answer to the right hon. leader of the Opposition with regard to my ruling on the question of privilege,

I may point out that rule 47 reads as follows:

Whenever any matter of privilege arises, it shall be taken into consideration immediately.

I find the following at page 302 of Bourinot, fourth edition:

Questions of privilege may be always considered without the notice necessary in the

I Mr. Crerar.]

ease of motions generally. It is the practice in the House of Commons to bring up a question of privilege after prayers, and before the House has taken up the Orders of the Day.

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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

I do not dispute that at all, Mr Speaker. What I urged was that an objection to an argument made in a current debate does not constitute a question of privilege; it is merely a matter to be taken up in the debate itself.

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LIB

William Stevens Fielding (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. FIELDING:

The correction of an error would be a legitimate question of privilege. It would not be a matter for argument, but it would be justifiable on the part of an hon. member to state that he had been misrepresented in a statement that had been made, and to do so as a question of privilege.

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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

If a question of error or alleged misrepresentation in a debate is to become a question of privilege, then I do not know where the Orders of the Day are going to end. I could now rise to about fifty questions of privilege that are in my mind at the moment.

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June 8, 1922