April 5, 1922

CON

Mr. STEVENS:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Is it the intention of the Government to continue the Royal Grain Inquiry Commission?

2. Has provision been made in the Estimates for an appropriation to defray the expense of said commission, or is there any existing appropriation?

3. If the commission is not to be continued, has the Government instructed the Board of Grain Commissioners to investigate certain violations of the Canada Grain Act alleged to have been committed by certain Terminal Elevator Companies and sworn to before the Royal Grain Inquiry Commission?

4. Is the Government aware that the Board of Grain Commissioners can only conduct an investigation when specific charges have been made, and is it the intention of the Government to file such charges against said Terminal Elevators, or their officers, based upon information and evidence revealed before said Royal Grain Inquiry Commission?

5. Will the Government instruct the Justice Department, or the Board of Grain Commissioners, to prosecute persons or corporations, against whom charges have been made before the Royal Grain Inquiry Commission, and if so, will steps be taken to iprosecute those charged with violation of the law?

6. Is the Government aware that serious charges were made before the Royal Grain Inquiry Commission, involving illegal practices resulting in serious losses to those entrusting their grain* to the custody of said Terminal Elevators?

7. If no formal or official report has been submitted to the Government, is the Government not aware that wide publicity has been given to said charges, and will the Government (in the possible absence of an official report) immediately institute such inquiries as will secure the necessary information?

Topic:   GRAIN INQUIRY
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LIB

Hon. Mr. ROBB: (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

1. Not as at present constituted.

2. There is an appropriation recommended in the Estimates for 1922-23, now before the House.

3. If specific charges of irregularity are made the Government will investigate them.

4. The late Royal Grain Inquiry Commission has made no report to the Government.

5. Answered by No. 4.

6. Answered by No. 4.

7. Answered by No. 3.

Topic:   GRAIN INQUIRY
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INCOME TAXES

CON

Mr. HOCKEN:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. What was the amount collected as income taxes from each province in the years 1919, 1920, 1921?

2. What were the total amounts paid by taxpayers on incomes to the Federal Government, in the cities of Toronto, Hamilton, Ottawa, Montreal, Quebec, Winnipeg, Calgary and Vancouver, in the years 1919, 1920 and 1921?

Questions

Topic:   INCOME TAXES
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LIB

Hon. Mr. FIELDING: (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

1.

Fiscal Years

1919 1920 1921$ 249,093 24 193,028 91 2,543,896 82 4,459,939 60 740,610 77 171,836 81 457,960 59 520,617 52 6,434 77 $ 506,993 06 333,370 98 7,246,246 21 8,182,736 93 1,871,387 86 478,244 38 636,248 72 995,433 92 13,757,37 $ 1,194,345 11 701,463 53 15,657,974 07 20,013,796 86 3,962,734 88 1,193,536 63 1,398,998 32 2,237,711 21 21,246 03

$ 9,343,419 03 32,970,061 81 $20,264,419 43 44,145,184 48 $46,3S1,806 64 40,841,401 25

Total Income and Business Profits Tax

$42,313,480 84 $64,409,603 91 $87,223,207 89

* Includes amounts received from taxpayers resident in the Province of Prince Edward Island.

** Includes amounts received from taxpayers resident in the Province of Quebec west of the County of Argenteuil as the collection in that territory can be more economically and advantageously handled by the District Office at Ottawa. .

*** During 1919 and 1920 included amounts received from taxpayers resident in the Province of Ontario west of Algoma.

Statistics showing collections by provinces under The Business Profits War Tax Act have not been compiled.

2. No information available, as statistics are compiled for districts and not municipalities.

Topic:   INCOME TAXES
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QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS

LIB

Mr. DEMERS:

Liberal

1. How many persons were made permanent

in the Civil Service from the 1st of April, 1920, to the 1st of January, 1922? .

2. How many persons were made permanent in the said service from December 7, 1921, to January 6, 1922, inclusive?

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
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CON

Mr. STEVENS:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. What dry docks are there located and operated at Vancouver?

2. When were they built and put into commission?

3. What are the dimensions?

4. What was the total gross tonnage entering and leaving the Port of Vancouver during the year 1921?

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
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CON

Mr. STEVENS:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. What dry docks are there located and operated at Victoria?

2. When were they built and put into commission?

3. What are the dimensions?

4. What was the total gross tonnage entering and leaVing the Port of Victoria during the year 1921?

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
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CON

Mr. STEVENS:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. What dry docks are there located and operated at Prince Rupert?

2. When were they built and put into commission?

3. What are the dimensions?

4. What was the total gross tonnage entering and leaving ithe Port of Prince Rupert during the year 1921?

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
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CON

Mr. STEVENS:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. What dry docks are there located and operated at Halifax?

2. When were they built and put into commission?

3. What are the dimensions?

4. What was the total gross tonnage entering and leaving the Port of Halifax during the year 1921?

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
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CON

Mr. STEVENS:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. What dry docks are tnere located and operated at St. John?

2. When were they built and put into commission?

3. What are the dimensions?

4. What was the total gross tonnage entering and leaving the Port of St. John, during the year 19211?

Mr. STEVENS?

1. What dry docks are there located and operated at Quebec?

2. When were they built and put into commission?

3. What are the dimensions?

4. What was the total gross tonnage entering and leaving the Pont of Quebec during the year 1921?

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
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CON

Mr. STEVENS:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. What dry docks are there located and operated at Montrael?

2. When were they built and put into commission?

3. What are the dimensions?

4. What was the total gross tonnage entering and leaving the Port of Montreal during tho year 1921?

Preference-Seaports

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS
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UNOPPOSED MOTIONS FOR PAPERS

LIB

Lewis Herbert Martell

Liberal

Mr. MARTELL:

For a return showing in detail the amount of money paid by the Government of Canada or any department thereof, to barristers and solicitors of the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia, between the 1st day of October, 1911, and the 30th day of January, 1922, both inclusive, for professional or other services. Also a copy of all bills of costs, expenses and charges of every kind rendered by said barristers and solicitors to the Government, showing the amount or amounts paid in each instance. Also showing the names of barristers and solicitors employed during the aforesaid period, the work performed and the amount paid for every item of said work to each of said barristers and solicitors.

Topic:   UNOPPOSED MOTIONS FOR PAPERS
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BRITISH PREFERENCE AND CANADIAN SEAPORTS


Mr. HANCE J. LOGAN moved: That, in the opinion of this House, the British tariff preference should be confined to goods brought into Canada through Canadian seaports. He said: Mr. Speaker, the tariff preference granted by this country on goods of the mother country and most of the dominions was distinctly a family matter. It created a very favorable impression throughout the Empire, and inspired the greatest of all living imperial poets to write those wonderful lines- A Nation spoke to a Nation, A Queen sent word to a Throne, "Daughter am I in my mother's house, But mistress in my own. The gates are mine to open, As the gates are mine to close." I desire, to-day, Mr. Speaker, to advocate that the gates of a foreign country shall be closed to this preference, freely given by the daughter to the mother. I submit you cannot build a nation upon pure materialism. In order to make a great country, you must create a national spirit. We need, I submit, in Canada, more intense Canadianism. What we lack-and I know not the reason-is that patriotic fervour that is so great an element in the building of national character. I desire to proclaim to the world that Canada is self-reliant and independent of other nations, and I desire, as far as I can, to impress upon certain dealers in goods on the other side of the Atlantic that this country is not bound in fields of ice during four or five months of the year. A few years ago the British Medical Association met in Toronto. They were sending out some specimens or some articles, required for demonstration. The association meeting was held in August, and on the box containing these articles 45Z for demonstration was written in plain English "Please protect from Frost". A merchant in Ottawa ordered certain Christmas goods in London to be delivered via the Canadian Pacific Railway Steamships. He received a letter in the early part of December stating that they regretted very much that they could not get these goods away before the Canadian ports had frozen up, and, therefore, they were sending them via New York. Surely, Mr. Speaker, it is time for us to declare, to the people of England at any rate, that we have ports in this country, both on the Atlantic and the Pacific, which are open the year around. This policy which I advocate has been proclaimed ever since Confederation, and even before. One of the leading policies of Canada has been that Canadian trade shall be carried through Canadian channels. Why did we build the Canadian Pacific Railway except to create trade east and west and west and east? The Intercolonial, the Grand Trunk Pacific, the National Transcontinental and the Canadian Northern were constructed largely to build up an interprovincial trade in Canada east and west and west and east. Even before Confederation this was a vision of our forefathers. It was eloquently expressed by the fathers of Confederation. The Hon. D'Arcy McGee, the great Irish-Canadian orator and statesman, speaking in the Confederation debate said: One reason why I, in season, and perhaps out of season, have continued an advocate for an Intercolonial railway has been that first, closest and most lasting connection of these Lower Provinces with the continental trade system, might be established by and through and in union with Canada. The same policy applied to the building extension and enlargement of the canals of Ontario and Quebec. The advantages of the policy which I advocate would not, by any means, be confined to the Maritime Provinces or to the ports of St. John and Halifax. It would be to the advantage of all ports in Canada. The English fall importation would largely come in through the ports of Quebec and Montreal, and importations from different British possessions, particularly New Zealand, to which the British preference applies, would be brought in via Vancouver and Prince Rupert. The cost of every carload of freight sent from the maritime provinces or British Columbia is increased because of the car having to be hauled back empty or nearly so. The cost of every shipload of freight from Montreal, Quebec, Halifax or St.



Preference Seaports John to the Mother Country, or from New Zealand to British Columbia, is increased on account of the lack of return cargo. I would like to impress upon my colleagues that the lack of a westbound cargo is the weakness of our transportation system with Great Britain. We can send over wheat and lumber, and fill the ships, but they often come back empty, only carrying ballast. It would create more competition among ocean freight carriers. Vessels sailing to certain ports would charge lower rates if they were assured of a return cargo. If more ships were provided with return cargoes it would mean lessening of freight rates; in other words, if we had competition rates would be lowered in both directions. I have before me a letter from one of the steamship companies in Canada in which I find the following statement: From my experience of 25 years I may say that steamers on the westbound trip from Great Britain or Europe are rarely full of cargo the vessels depending almost entirely on the freight from Canada to Great Britain and the continent for their earnings. That sufficient tonnage could not be obtained to carry the traffic is, from my experience, incorrect. The fact of the matter is that all the large lines coming to Canada, if the traffic was obtainable could place a larger number of steamers on the several routes. The lack of business, especially on the westbound voyage makes it unprofitable. In the winter months, when the boats run to both Halifax and St. John if full cargoes were obtainable to Canada we could give lower freight rates on goods carried from Canada than when earning practically nothing westbound, which is pretty much the case at present.


CON

John Babington Macaulay Baxter

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BAXTER:

I should like to suggest

to my hon. friend that if he cannot get real sympathy, he might, at least, appeal for the apparent sympathy afforded by silence in this House, so that members who are interested in what he says may have an opportunity of hearing him. It is an impossibility to hear him at present.

Topic:   BRITISH PREFERENCE AND CANADIAN SEAPORTS
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LIB

Hance James Logan

Liberal

Mr. LOGAN:

Thank you. Referring to sugar, he said:

A large amount of the traffic that comes to Canada finds its way via New York and Boston. Nearly all the sugar for the Montreal refineries comes via New York, whereas if the preference was only given to sugar coming direct to Canadian ports it would benefit Halifax and St. John, give employment to an extra number of steamers, give a large extra revenue to our railroads and leave a large amount of money in Halifax and St. John and also Montreal.

The Canadian Pacific, having their steamships on the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, would be able to give as cheap a rate of freight from ports in Great Britain as any American steamship line with connecting

lines of railway, because of their desire not only to give westbound freight to their ships, but to give westbound freight to their railway system.

Topic:   BRITISH PREFERENCE AND CANADIAN SEAPORTS
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April 5, 1922