June 3, 1921

ADDRESS TO HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR GENERAL ON HIS RETIREMENT FROM OFFICE.

UNION

Arthur Meighen (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Unionist

Right Hon. ARTHUR MEIGHEN (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I ask the unanimous consent of the House to move:

That an address be presented to His Excellency the Governor General on the occasion of the approaching termination of His Excellency's official connection with this country.

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UNION

Edgar Nelson Rhodes (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Unionist

Mr. SPEAKER:

I am quite certain the House will have pleasure in granting the request.

Some 'hon. MEMBERS: Carried.

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UNION

Arthur Meighen (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Unionist

Mr. MEIGHEN:

I beg to move, seconded by the Hon. Mr. Mackenzie King:

That a humble address be presented to His Excellency the Governor General in the following words:

" To His Excellency Victor Christian 'William, Duke of Devonshire, Marquess of Hartington, Earl of Devonshire, Earl of Burlington, Baron Cavendish of Hardwicke, Baron Cavendish of Keighley, K.G., P.C., etc., etc., etc., Governor-General and Commander-in-Chief of the Dominion of Canada.

"May it please Tour Excellency:

" We, His Majesty's dutiful and loyal subjects, the Commons of Canada in Parliament assembled, as well for ourselves as on behalf of those whom we represent, beg leave respectfully to convey to Tour Excellency an expression of the deep regret with which the Country has learned of the approaching conclusion of your official connection with Canada.

"We beg to assure Tour Excellency of the deep appreciation with which we have witnessed your unflagging zeal and devotion in the discharge of the duties devolving upon you as His Majesty's representative in this Dominion. We recall that it was in the midst of the tremendous struggle from which the Empire has victoriously emerged that Your Excellency assumed office. We thankfully remember the value of your services to the Country during days of storm and stress, as we gratefully acknowledge their worth during the difficult period of consequent readjustment.

" Your Excellency has by travel acquired a wide and deep knowledge of the country and shown a sympathetic understanding of the ideals and aspirations of its people, and we beg leave to assure you of our appreciation of your interest in, and advocacy of, every national cause, and your support of Art, 'Science, and Education.

"We feel that any acknowledgment of your services would be Incomplete without an expression of your sense of the gracious part taken by Her Excellency the Duchess of Devonshire, and by your family, in the varied duties attending your office. Her Excellency's name will ever recall to the people of Canada all that is dignified in an exalted station, and the remembrance of yourself and your family, everything that is lovely in private life.

" We venture to hope that when Your Excellency resigns your trust into the hands of the King, you will assure His Majesty of the unalterable loyalty and devotion of the Canadian people to His Majesty's throne and person, of their abiding affection for the Motherland, and of their firm resolve to maintain and strengthen the ties which bind together His Majesty's dominions.

" In bidding farewell to Your Excellency, to the Duchess of Devonshire, and to your family, we beg leave to express our warm wishes for your future welfare and happiness."

In moving, with the unanimous consent of the House, the adoption of the Address which you, Sir, have just read, and which I venture to think will be unanimously concurred in, I am animated by somewhat mixed feelings, which I think the House will share. The country has been uniformly fortunate in the succession of distinguished men who have represented the authority of His Majesty's Crown in this Dominion; and none has more fully upheld the traditions of this high office, or established a place of warmer regard in the hearts of the people of this country, than has His Excellency the Duke of Devonshire. But, while we shall heartily join in grateful ackowledgment of his services, it is with very deep regret that we contemplate the approaching conclusion of his term of office.

His Excellency, as the Address recalls, assumed office in the midst of war, and his support of every national activity, whether

governmental, patriotic, charitable, or other, was a source of inspiration to the country during the trials through which it has passed. His example and assistance have been no less valuable during the difficulties of the period of readjustment to the ways of peace.

If we reflect on the purpose and scope of the office of the Governor-General, we shall, I think, conclude that it is one which, if its purpose is to be the wisest, its scope the most ample, requires special, and may employ the finest talents. I do not now, in this place I do not need to, refer to the position of the Governor-General as the constitutional representative of the King's Majesty. It is sometimes forgotten, perhaps we, here, are likely to forget, that government is not the sole expression of society's mind and activity. There are regions of life which lie beyond its range; but they do not, I think, lie without the scope of the office of a Governor-General who desires to bring his energy and capacity to the service of those among whom he occupies that exalted position. National life has many facts, many organs and methods for expressing its purpose, and it has been peculiarly the service of His Excellency to this country that he has sought to understand them all, and to support those which are of good augury and report. Remembering titoafc uprightness exalted a nation, he has exerted himself to evoke those qualities which alone can make a nation great.

In the manifold duties of his office, Her Excellency and their family have taken an extensive and gracious part. All have received the respect, and, I will beg leave to say, have earned the regard of the whole people of the Dominion. Their tact, their charm, their simplicity have contributed much to enhance that regard, and while we shall regretfully bid them farewell, we congratulate ourselves that in a critical and eventful time, when error, indiscretion or any failure or imperfection would have been followed by consequences the most unfortunate, we have had at the service of this country what was once described by Burke as " the temperate, permanent, hereditary virtue of the whole house of Cavendish."

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (leader of the Opposition) :

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UNI L

Thomas Alexander Crerar

Unionist (Liberal)

Hon. T. A. CRERAR (Marquette) :

Mr. Speaker, it is a privilege to join with the right bon. leader of the Government, and the hon. official leader of the Opposition in support of the motion which is now before the House. It is, as all motions coming before this House are, more or less formal in character, but nevertheless it properly and correctly expresses the obli-

gations under which the Canadian people rest to their Excellencies the Governor General and the Duchess of Devonshire, not only for the fine manner in which their official duties have been discharged, but for the free and sympathetic way in which they have come in contact with the Canadian people in the various offices which they have had to perform. The interest of their Excellencies in Canada is well known to all. There is scarcely a corner of this Dominion which they have not at some time visited, and the Canadian people will long remember the pleasure of those visits. They have endeavoured at all times to familiarize themselves, not only with the official relationship, but with the actual personal relationship with the people. That interest has always been first, and I venture to say that in the years that are to come it is the personal relationship that will linger longest in our memories. The Duke and Duchess of Devonshire are leaving us after a full period of official duties, and they carry back to the homeland not only the abiding regard and affection of the Canadian people, but as well our very best wishes for their future happiness.

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?

Right Hon. S@

Mr. Speaker, having served for

nearly four years as Prime Minister under His Excellency, I may be permitted to associate myself with what has been so eloquently and appropriately said by the speakers who have preceded me and also to- add a few words. It was at no small personal sacrifice that the Duke of Devonshire undertook the duties which he has fulfilled with such distfindtion and acceptance since the autumn of 1916. Inheriting a tradition of distinguished public service which in his family has extended over many centuries, he has evinced the possession of great qualities for which many of his name have been noted; remarkable ability and aptitude for public affairs, rare good judgment, firmness, steadiness, and last, but not least, a fine sense of proportion.

He came to us endowed with an experience which is most important, if not necessary, for a Governor General of this Dominion. More and more in all the Dominions the constitutional relation of the Governor General to his ministers has approximated to -the relation of the King to the British ministry. Especially is this true of Canada. The Duke of Devonshire was educated in public life, and thus he thoroughly understood and appreciated the trend and development of constitutional relations. One could always observe that

his mind was thoroughly receptive of the constitutional developments which have been somewhat marked in recent years.

As Prime Minister my relations with His Excellency was necessarily of a very intimate nature. On all occasions I gave to him my entire confidence in all that concerned public affairs, and I have a very grateful recollection and appreciation of the thoughtful suggestions and wise counsel which he gave to me on many occasions of stress and difficulty.

As Governor General he has thrown himself wholeheartedly into the current of our national life, and there are few Canadians who know our country as thoroughly as he does. The Duchess of Devonshire who ever since her girlhood has been intimately associated with the history of this country, and whose charm has won all hearts, has displayed the same active and earnest interest in all that concerns the welfare of our people.

Doubtless many years of active and honourable public service remain before His Excellency after his return to the United Kingdom. He and the Duchess and all the members of their family will carry with them to the homeland the warm affection and universal respect of the Canadian people. In bidding Their Excellencies and the members of their family Godspeed, we hope that we may say not farewell but au revoir; and we feel that in spirit and at heart in leaving us they are still Canadians.

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Motion agreed to.


UNION

Arthur Meighen (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Unionist

Right Hon. ARTHUR MEIGHEN (Prime Minister) :

I beg to move, seconded by the hon. leader of the Opposition, that a message be sent to the Senate, informing their honours that this House has passed an address to His Excellency the Governor General, on the occasion of the approaching termination of His Excellency's final connection with this country, and requesting their honours to unite with this House in the said address.

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Motion agreed to.


REPORTED APPOINTMENT OF GOVERNOR GENERAL


On the Orders of the Day.


L LIB

Henri Sévérin Béland

Laurier Liberal

Hon. H. S. BELAND (Beauce) :

Before the Orders of the Day are proceeded with, I would like to ask the hon. leader of the Government in regard to the reports pub-fished yesterday and to-day in the press of Canada to the effect that Lord Byng had

been appointed Governor General of Canada. May I ask the right hon. leader of the Government whether he is in a position to make a public announcement.

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UNION

Arthur Meighen (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Unionist

Mr. MEIGHEN:

I regret, Mr. Speaker, that I am not in a position to make an announcement.

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JUDGE SNIDER'S REPORT

L LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux

Laurier Liberal

Hon. RODOLPHE LEMIEUX (Gaspe):

As the session is drawing to a close, may I ask the right hon. leader if it is possible for the House to have the report of Mr. Justice Snider before prorogation?

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UNION

Arthur Meighen (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Unionist

Right Hon. ARTHUR MEIGHEN (Prime Minister) :

I caused inquiries to be made

of Mr. Biggar immediately after the hon. gentleman spoke on a previous occasion, and Mr. Biggar informed my secretary that it was expected that the final report would be ready at the end of this week, or, at the latest, the beginning of next week. I earnestly hope myself that it will be ready to-morrow.

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L LIB

Charles Murphy

Laurier Liberal

Hon. CHARLES MURPHY (Russell):

I would like to point out to my right hon. friend that he is under a misapprehension as to what is asked for. There was a special Order in Council passed directing a special inquiry in regard to the destruction of certain volumes. That is one matter. The statement is that that inquiry is completed and the report made and adopted by council. There was another Order in Council passed directing another inquiry into other things at the Bureau, but that other inquiry which is still proceeding has nothing to do with the first one, which was complete when the report was made.

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UNION

Arthur Meighen (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Unionist

Mr. MEIGHEN:

I do not want to speak too positively, but I think the hon. gentleman is wrong.

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L LIB

Charles Murphy

Laurier Liberal

Mr. MURPHY:

If the right hon. gentleman makes inquiries he will find that I am correct.

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June 3, 1921