May 11, 1921

ARMISTICE DAY

UNION

Hugh Guthrie (Solicitor General of Canada; Minister of Militia and Defence)

Unionist

Hon. HUGH GUTHRIE (Minister of Militia):

Mr. Speaker, I beg leave to ask the consent of the House to move that Bill No. 119, an Act respecting Armistice Day, now appearing on Public Bills and Orders be transferred to Government Orders.

Topic:   ARMISTICE DAY
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Motion agreed to.


EXTRADITION TREATY

UNION

Charles Joseph Doherty (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Unionist

Right Hon. C. J. DOHERTY (Minister of Justice):

I beg leave to lay on the Table of the House, copies of a Supplementary Extradition Convention with the United States signed at London on January 15, 1917. This is the treaty which makes wife 'desertion an extraditable offence.

Topic:   EXTRADITION TREATY
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CHINESE IMMIGRATION


Hon. J. A. CALDER (Minister of Immigration and Colonization) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 146, to amend the Chinese Immigration Act.


L LIB
UNION

James Alexander Calder (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister presiding over the Department of Health; President of the Privy Council)

Unionist

Mr. CALDER:

The most important

amendment contained in the Bill will be found in the first section. As the law now stands, Chinese merchants coming to Canada are admitted without paying a head tax, on the production of a certificate of identity which is issued by the officers of the Chinese Government and vised by the British Consular Officers in China. It has been found during the past year-I think to some extent owing to conditions in China-that a good deal of abuse has prevailed in connection with the issuing of these certificates. Consequently we propose to abolish the certificates and require every Chinese merchant landing on our western coasts to satisfy the controller of immigration there as to the' bona fides of his status.

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L LIB

Charles Murphy

Laurier Liberal

Mr. MURPHY:

Is this controller of

Chinese immigration an official of this Government?

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UNION

James Alexander Calder (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister presiding over the Department of Health; President of the Privy Council)

Unionist

Mr. CALDER:

Yes. The second amendment is to the effect that a board of inquiry, appointed under the general Immigration Act, may determine the question as to whether or not a person of Chinese race has legally entered Canada. Under the law as it now stands, if any question arises in that connection it must be tried by a magistrate. Under our general immigration law, applying to all other people, these cases are heard by a board of inquiry and determined by them, so it is proposed to make the two laws uniform in that respect. The third amendment relates to section 18 of the Chinese Immigration Act. That section deals with and enumerates the prohibited classes-for example paupers, lunatics and others of that category, The provision in the present Chinese Act does not go as far as a similar provision in our general law, and the object of this amendment is to make the two laws the same in that respect-that is to define in both our Acts, the general Act and the Chinese Immigration Act, the classes that are prohibited and to make them the same. Then there is a further provision to this effect: Under the law as it now stands, Chinese, other than the non-immigrant class, who enter Canada are required to pay a head tax of $500. They, however, have the right to return to China. That is called "registering out." They obtain a certificate when they leave and under that certificate they are entitled to return to Canada at any time within the year without again paying the head tax. It is proposed to make the period a two-year period instead of, as at present, one year. Then there is a fifth amendment to this effect: That where a person of the Chinese race has entered Canada illegally-if he belongs to, say, any of the prohibited classes, and has succeeded in securing entry to Canada illegally, and is afterwards found-the question as to his right to remain in Canada shall be determined by the controller of Chinese immigration. There is, of course, in all cases an appeal to the minister, as undtsr the general Immigration Act. In addition there are a number of minor amendments which deal largely with small matters of administration.

Motion agreed to and Bill read the first time.

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QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.)


CARTIER SQUARE, OTTAWA-STORES SHED

UNION

*Mr. PRIPP:

Unionist

1. When the Stores shed was erected on Cartier Square for Military purposes during the Great War were assurances given to the Corporation of the City of Ottawa, by the Department of Militia, that the building was only of a temporary character, and that it would be removed as soon as possible after the war terminated?

2. If so, is it the intention of the Government to cause This unsightly structure to be removed at an early date?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CARTIER SQUARE, OTTAWA-STORES SHED
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UNION

Hon. Mr. GUTHRIE: (Solicitor General of Canada; Minister of Militia and Defence)

Unionist

1. No.

2. It is unfortunately necessary to require this building for some considerable time, as it is fully occupied with war stores.

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Subtopic:   CARTIER SQUARE, OTTAWA-STORES SHED
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CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAY-ST. SIMON

L LIB

Mr. TRAHAN:

Laurier Liberal

1. Has Mr. Didace Rodrique ever been in the

employ of the Canadian National Railways at St. Simon, as telegraph operator or station agent? .

2. Is he still in the service of the Government? *

3. If not, when did he resign or was he discharged?

4. If discharged, what was the reason for his dismissal?

5. Does the said Rodrique receive a pension from the Government? If so, what is the rate of same?

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Subtopic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAY-ST. SIMON
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UNION

Hon. Mr. REID: (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Unionist

1. Yes; as station agent at St. Simon.

2. No.

3 and 4. He was pensioned December 1, 1914.

5. Yes; twenty-three dollars and eighteen cents per month.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAY-ST. SIMON
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POSTMISTRESS OF PIERREVILLE

May 11, 1921