April 26, 1921

L LIB
UNION

James Alexander Calder (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister presiding over the Department of Health; President of the Privy Council)

Unionist

Mr. CALDER:

Yes, many of them voted for me as well. You have the two views expressed. Mr. Beatty, for example, on the one hand, holds the view that those people should be admitted very freely to Canada if they are the right kind of people -farmers and others of that class. On the other hand, I am inclined to think that the hon. member for Marquette (Mr. TMr. Calder.]

Crerar) holds a different view. The quotation of his statements which I gave from the Manitoba Free Press, distinctly states that we must be very careful in admitting those people in large numbers at the present time on account of conditions in Western Canada. Those people are not of the same race; they have different ideals, different customs. It is quite true, I have no doubt, that, in the process of time they will become assimilated; but whether we should admit large numbers of those people in a comparatively short time where those three Prairie Provinces have had many difficulties in the past, is a problem that must be very carefully considered.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
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?

An hon. MEMBER:

What-

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UNION

James Alexander Calder (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister presiding over the Department of Health; President of the Privy Council)

Unionist

Mr. CALDER:

We are in committee now and there will be plenty of opportunity for asking questions afterwards. I would prefer it if hon. members refrained from asking questions at present, because that naturally throws me off. What I was going to say is this, that down to the present time, on account of those people with their ideals, customs and ideas coming and settling in large communities together, all three provinces in Western Canada have had a great deal of trouble on their hands from the educational standpoint, the social standpoint, and that sort of thing. I think I am voicing the view of the majority of the people of Western Canada when I say that, while they consider those people to whom I refer as suitable as being farmers and from the standpoint of wealth production, and being able to succeed and to be eventually assimilated, they say: "Do not bring these people in in such numbers that they will be out of proportion to the peoplh in these provinces now; we have enough trouble on our hands at present."

Topic:   THE BUDGET
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L LIB
UNION

James Alexander Calder (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister presiding over the Department of Health; President of the Privy Council)

Unionist

Mr. CALDER:

I was referring particularly to the trouble which they have had in connection with their educational problem.

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L LIB

Frank S. Cahill

Laurier Liberal

Mr. CAHILL:

Is the educational problem not largely due to the Dominion Government's agreement? Did the Dominion Government not make an agreement of that kind with the Mennonites when they came in?

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UNION

James Alexander Calder (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister presiding over the Department of Health; President of the Privy Council)

Unionist

Mr. CALDER:

It has nothing to do with that at all. Just a word as to the regulations that we have put into force in order,

if possible, to check the flow of people who may be regarded as undesirable or not needed in Canada at the present time. During the progress of the previous debate, many hon. members referred to the two Orders in Council providing for certain regulations. Let me say in the first place that at the present time-and I am sure I am not exaggerating-there are in the big cities^ in the small cities and in the ports of Europe, hundreds of thousands of people awaiting entry into either Canada or the United States. Many of those people are war refugees; many of them have lost everything they had in the world, and are looking out over the world to find a new country in which they can make a home. Many of thean are penniless; they simply endeavour to scrape together what they can to get out to some new country. They are weary of Europe and all that it means to them, and they want to get away. We have set up two restrictions in an endeavour to hold back that flood. In the first place, we have increased the money qualification, and a good deal of objection was taken to that in the House the other day. The Order in Council now in force provides that, with the exception of farmers, farm labourers and domestic servants, all other classes of skilled and unskilled labourers, must have $250 in cash. In ordinary times the money qualification required is only $50.

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CON
UNION

James Alexander Calder (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister presiding over the Department of Health; President of the Privy Council)

Unionist

Mr. CALDER:

All farm labourers, all farmers, all domestic servants, are allowed in even if they have nothing in their pocket. As regards others, if a man is accompanied by his wife, he must have $125 in addition, and if accompanied by minor children, he must have $50 in addition for each child. Hon. members can easily calculate how much money a family would have to have. The question, in a nutshell, is, whether or not we should relax. The other day when the subject was under discussion, many members said that we had a money restriction on farmers and farm labourers desirous of ccaning to Canada. That is not so, and it never has been so. We have put up the money qualification to restrict city dwellers, skilled and unskilled labour. Does any person mean to tell me that we should lower that restriction at the present time; that we should allow any man to enter Canada because he is sound in body and mind and willing to work, with nothing in his pocket; that we should allow 500 such

people to land in Toronto, 600 in Hamilton,

1,000 in Winnipeg and 2,000 in Vancouver? I doubt it very much.

I think some hon. gentlemen have an idea that this is a fixed thing. It is not fixed; it may be changed at any time. Just so soon as economic and other conditions in Canada warrant us in removing it, it can be removed. It is a matter that is entirely in the hands of the Governor in Council. But so long as conditions now prevailing continue, it seems to me, it is in the interests not only of Canada but of the immigrant himself that he should not be allowed to enter unless he has sufficient money to take care of him for a short while.

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PRO
UNION

James Alexander Calder (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister presiding over the Department of Health; President of the Privy Council)

Unionist

Mr. CALDER:

But the trouble there,

as my hon. friend will realize, is who is going to decide whether he has a good pair of hands?

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PRO
UNION

James Alexander Calder (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister presiding over the Department of Health; President of the Privy Council)

Unionist

Mr. CALDER:

Here are thousands of

people desirous of coming into Canada. Are we going to decide in the case of every one of them whether he has a good pair of hands? You must have a restriction of that kind, or none at all, it seems to me.

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LIB
UNION

James Alexander Calder (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister presiding over the Department of Health; President of the Privy Council)

Unionist

Mr. CALDER:

He must show it.

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LIB
L LIB
UNION

James Alexander Calder (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister presiding over the Department of Health; President of the Privy Council)

Unionist

Mr. CALDER:

We do not take the

money from them. They simply show that they have it in their possession.

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LIB

Louis Édouard Fernand Rinfret

Liberal

Mr. RINFRET:

Then the same money

might be shown by several different immigrants; it might be just loaned to them for the purpose of getting in?

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April 26, 1921