April 22, 1921

HOUSE OF COMMONS STAFF

UNION

Edgar Nelson Rhodes (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Unionist

Mr. SPEAKER:

I have the honour to lay on the Table, for the approval of the House, copies of Orders in Council P.C. 2483, dated October 23, 1920, and P.C. 2652, dated November 1, 1920, in respect to changes in the organization of the Law

Branch of the House; and also, the recommendation of the Civil Service Commission with respect to the compensation for certain positions on the staff of the House; the whole pursuant to subsection (1) of section 45B of the Civil Service Act, 1918, as amended. -

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COMMITTEE ON PRIVILEGES AND ELECTIONS

UNION

Arthur Meighen (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Unionist

Right Hon. ARTHUR MEIGHEN (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I move, seconded by Mr. Reid, that the names of the Hon. Mr. Murphy and Mr. Papineau be substituted for those of Mr. Lemieux and Mr. Devlin on the Select Standing Committee on Privileges and Elections.

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Motion agreed to.


NATURALIZATION ACT, 1914, AMENDMENT


Mr. JOSEPH ARCHAMBAULT (Cham-bly and Vercheres) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 105 to amend the Act to revive and amend the Naturalization Act, 1914. He said: Mr. Speaker, the purpose of the Bill is to remedy a grave injustice, now existing I believe through an oversight in regard to subjects of the Allied countries who went overseas and fought in the Allied armies. The Naturalization Act of 1914 requires of an alien a residence of five years, within the last eight years, in His Majesty's Dominions, the last year's residence preceding the application for naturalization having been in Canada. At the outbreak of the war, in order not to embarrass aliens who had enlisted in the Crown forces, the law was amended in such a way as to provide that the time passed in such forces should count as residence in Canada for the purposes of naturalization. Paragraph 6 of subsection 2, of section 3 of the Act, to revive and amend the Naturalization Act of 1914, reads as follows: For the purposes of this section a period spent in the service of the Crown may, if the Secretary of State of Canada thinks fit, be treated as equivalent to a period of residence in Canada. The service of the subjects of Allied countries in the armies of the Allies has evidently been overlooked, for they do not benefit by this clause, and the consequence is that the Belgian, or the Frenchman, or the Italian who resided in Canada before the war and who had to join the forces of Belgium, or France, or Italy, does not benefit by that service. He has to reside, after



coming back to Canada, another five years, or possibly ten years, according to another amendment of last year, to the Naturalization Act. The time he spent in Canada before the war, or the time in which he was in the service of any Allied army, does not count. Furthermore, this fact does not enable the alien who served in His Majesty's Allied armies to obtain his patent for homestead, because to do so he must be a British subject. A case has been brought to my notice of a Belgian who came to Canada in 1910. He resided in this country four years, and when the war broke out joined the Belgian army, and when he came back in 1919 he had to start all over again. He had to begin the period of five years' residence-and possibly, because of the amendment to which I have referred, it may be ten years-before he can obtain his naturalization papers and have the right to apply for patent for homestead. The object of my Bill is to remedy this situation by adding after the words "Crown Forces" in paragraph 6, the words "or in His Majesty's Allied armies." I think this would remedy a grave injustice which, in my opinion, is just the result of oversight on the pa-rt of the Government. Motion agreed to and Bill read the first time.


MIGRATORY BIRDS


Mr. Tolmie moved the first reading of Bill No. 84 (from the Senate) to amend the Migratory Birds Convention Act. Motion agreed to and Bill read the first time. ! I


PRIVATE BILLS FROM THE SENATE-FIRST READINGS


Bill No. 85 for the relief of Duncan MacDonald Oxley.-Mr. Glass. Bill No. 86 for the relief of Rose Winifred Smith.-Mr. Fripp. Bill No. 87 for the relief bf Evelyn Campbell.-Mr. Best. Bill No. 88 for the relief of Margaret Thorne Acton.-Mr. Sheard. Bill No. 89 for the relief of Lillian Florence Ansell.-Mr. Douglas (Strath-cona). Bill No. 90 for the relief of Ellen Greenwood.-Mr. Smith. Bill No. 91 for the relief of Edna Garnet Rabb.-Mr. Fripp. Bill No. 92 for the relief of Gertrude Gladys Vernon.-Mr. Fripp. Bill No. 93 for the relief of Stella Anna Jackson.-Mr. Mowat. Bill No. 94 for the relief of Mabel Marshall.-Mr. Mowat. Bill No. 95 for the relief of Margaret Marie Cook.-Mr. Clarke (Wellington). Bill No. 96 for the relief of Jean Grey Holt.-Mr. Mowat. Bill No. 97 for the relief of Harry Tolhurst.-Mr. Smith. .Bill No. 98 for the relief of Rosetta Hood.-Mr. Fripp. Bill No. 99 for the relief of Albert Edwin Gordon.-Mr. McQuarrie. Bill No. 100 for the relief of Willie Hopkinson.-Mr. Fripp. Bill No. 101 for the relief of Mamie Me-Killop.-Mr. Currie. Bill No. 102 for the relief of Frederick Robert Studffolme.-Mr. Blair. Bill No. 103 for the relief of Beatrice Osborne.-Mr. Fripp. Bill No. 104 for the relief of John Ver-ner McAree.-Mr. Fripp.


CONSIDERED I'N COMMITTEE-1THIRD READINGS


Bill No. 44, respecting The Western Dominion Railway Company.-Mr. Morphy. Bill No. 58, for the relief of Hazel Galbraith.-Mr. Douglas (Strathcona). Bill No. 48, for the relief of William John Bell.-Mr. Tudhope. Bill No. 62, for the relief of Frederick Harold Walton.-Mr. Fripp. Bill No. 63, for the relief of Mary Elizabeth Leonard.-Mr. Ball. Bill No. 64, for the relief of Alexander LaRue.-Mr. Douglas (Strathcona). Bill No. 65, for the relief of Maria Martin Morel.-Mr. Fripp. Bill No. 67, for the relief of George Gour-ley.-Mr. Fripp. Bill No. 68, for the relief of Thomas Edwin William Flower.-Mr. Fripp. Bill No. 69, for the relief of Royland Stanley Morrison.-Mr. Douglas (Strathcona ). Bill No. 70, for the relief of Arthur Ebenezer Sims.-Mr. Smith. Bill No. 33, respecting the "Credit Fonder Franco-Canadien."-Mr. Chabot. Bill No. 15, to incorporate North American Trust Company of Canada, and recommending that the title be changed to "An Act to incorporate Metropolitan Trust Company of Canada."-Mr. Mowat.


GILMOUR AND HUGHSON, LIMITED


On the Order: Consideration of amendments made by the Senate to Bill No. 14, an Act to amend an Act to incorporate Gil-mour and Hughson, Limited.-Mr. Fripp.


L LIB

Georges Henri Boivin (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Laurier Liberal

Mr. BOIVIN:

The hon. member for

Ottawa (Mr. Fripp), who is in charge of this Bill, has not yet been able to submit the amendments to the promoters of the Bill, and is therefore desirous to have consideration of these amendments postponed.

Order stands.

PRIVILEGE-STATEMENTS BY

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MESSRS. LAPOINTE AND MACKENZIE KING


On the Orders of the Day: Mt.' ERNEST LAPOINTE (Quebec East) : Before the Orders of the Day are called I desire to rise to a question of privilege in regard to a statement published in the press which affects very seriously and is a reflection upon many members of this House, including myself. In both the Globe and the Mail and Empire of Wednesday, April 20, apears a report of a meeting held in Toronto which was addressed by a gentleman styled in the report "A. L. Davidson, M.P., for Digby and Antigonish" and who is reported as having made the following statement concerning the leader of the Opposition and his selection as leader of the Liberal party: "The Rockefeller interests of the United States thought it would be a good idea if they could have one of their former employees leader of a nation party in Canada, and they were willing to spend a little money to attain that end," said Mr. Davidson. Down in Quebec there were a number of young men who were willing to go to the Convention and support Mr. King if somebody else paid the expenses. Mr. Speaker, the statement made there constitutes a foul, mean, despicable slander.


?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Hear, hear.

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April 22, 1921