April 12, 1921

CON

*Mr. WHITE:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. What is the total number of cattle and horses that were already on the Blood Reserve when the Government started its greater production campaign on Indian Reserves in the Spring of 1918?

2. What income from the grazing on their reserve of cattle and horses belonging to white people did the Blood Indians receive for 1917?

3. Was the Blood Reserve one of the Indian

Reserves classified by the Minister of the Interior as largely vacant and unutilized when he was answering objections to the passage of the amendment to the Indian Act on April 23, 1918, as reported in Hansard, pages 1048 to 1055? .

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   BLOOD INDIAN RESERVE
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UNION

Right Hon. ARTHUR MEIGHEN: (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Unionist

1. Cattle 3,300, horses 3,677.

2. $10,250.

3. Yes.

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Subtopic:   BLOOD INDIAN RESERVE
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CON

*Mr. WHITE:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. How many grazing leases of portions of the Blood Reserve were issued in 1918 by officers of the Department of Indian Affairs?

2. Was the leasing done by public tender?

3. Who authorized the granting of leases on the Blood Reserve without asking or obtaining the consent of the Indian owners?

4. Under what law were the grazing leases of 1918 on this Reserve issued?

5. Does the Government believe that war urgency is a valid excuse for breaking treaties?

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Subtopic:   BLOOD INDIAN RESERVE
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UNION

Right Hon. ARTHUR MEIGHEN: (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Unionist

1. 38.

2. No.

3. Answered by No. 4.

4. Under authority of Order in Council of February 16,1918, and section 4, Cap 26, 8-9 George V.

5. Answered by No. 4. *

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Subtopic:   BLOOD INDIAN RESERVE
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L LIB

*Mr. MOLLOY:

Laurier Liberal

1. D'id a delegation of prospective lessees come to Ottawa in the early months of 1918 to secure leases on the Blood Reserve from the Government? If so, on what date?

2. Who were the delegates, and who was the member or representative of the Government with whom they discussed the matter in Ottawa?

3. Did the Indian Department, or any of its executive officers, without obtaining the consent of the Indians, grant a number of grazing leases on the Blood Reserve in the spring of 1918?

4. If so, for how long a term were said leases granted?

EMr. MottlOy. ]

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Subtopic:   BLOOD INDIAN RESERVE
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UNION

Right Hon. ARTHUR MEIGHEN: (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Unionist

1. No.

2. Answered by No. 1. [DOT]

3. Yes, under ^authority of Order in Council of February 16, 1918, and section 4, Cap. 26, 8-9 George V.

4. One year term renewable yearly up to five years, and subject to termination upon giving six weeks' notice in writing.

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Subtopic:   BLOOD INDIAN RESERVE
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CON

*Mr. WHITE:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Is the Government aware that certain Blood Indians were by the Greater Production leases of 1918 deprived of their means of living on the reserve and have since been obliged to roam about the surrounding country hunting odd jobs by which to support their families?

2. Is it the intention of the Government tc continue the said grazing leases on the Blood Reserve for 1921?

3. How many Blood Indians are at present homeless as the result of the said Greater Production leases of 1918 and the continuation thereof in 1919 and 1920?

4. Is it the intention of the Government to repeal the amendment of the Indian Act under which these dispossessions took place?

5. Has the Indian Department ottered compensation to any of the dispossessed Indians? If so, when, to whom, and what was the compensation ottered?

6. If not, why?

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Subtopic:   BLOOD INDIAN RESERVE
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UNION

Right Hon. ARTHUR MEIGHEN: (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Unionist

1. No.

2. Yes, if it is in the interest of the Indians to do so.

3. Answered by No. 1.

4. It is not the intention of the Government to introduce any amendments to the Indian Act during the present session. (See answer No. 1).

5 and 6. Answered by No. 1.

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Subtopic:   BLOOD INDIAN RESERVE
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UNION

*Mr. SHAW:

Unionist

1. What revenue has heen received for the Indians "owning the various reserves in Saskatchewan and Alberta from grazing leases since the spring of 1918?

2. What rentals were previously received for the benefit of the Indians from these lands?

3. What amount of the total revenue was received on account of the Blood Reserve and credited to the Blood Indians?

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Subtopic:   BLOOD INDIAN RESERVE
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UNION

Right Hon. ARTHUR MEIGHEN: (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Unionist

1. $321,976.

2. $10,000.

3. $97,190.

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Subtopic:   BLOOD INDIAN RESERVE
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UNION

*Mr. SHAW:

Unionist

1. Who was the agent of the Blood Reserve from June, 1908, to June, 1911?

2. Did the financial inspector of the department report on the cattle conditions of this reserve in July, 1911?

3. What was the nature of his reports?

4. Did the agent refuse to sign the statement of the cattle owners?

5. How many cattle were there on the Blood Reserve according to the statements of the agent in 1909?

6. How many were found on the reserve in 1911 when the cattle wTere dipped for mange?

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Subtopic:   BLOOD INDIAN RESERVE
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UNION

Right Hon. ARTHUR MEIGHEN: (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Unionist

1. R. N. Wilson.

2. Yes.

3. The inspector reported as follows:

The catitle business which should be the greatest industry here has for some years been declining at a tremendous rate. The agent's annual report shows that in 1909 they had 7,348 head, which in 1910 had fallen to 5,285 head, or a loss of 2,063 head, which, if estimated at $30 each, would represent $61,890, and the calf crop had fallen from 1,667 to 980 in one year. At the count this year which was made during the dipping for mange, and which can be relied upon as nearly correct as can be made under the circumstances, the count was 2,934, and 459 calves branded in addition. This makes a loss to the herd of 2,351 head, which at an average of $30 per head represents $70,530, or a loss in two seasons of over $132,000 in value, besides a reduction in the calf crop from 1,667 in 1909 to 459 in 1911, although it is altogether likely there will be more calves dropped this year. It will be noted that there are only 912 cows left and 98 two-year-old heifers. These are the classes that a hard winter affects the most here, because nothing was done to provide against the cold weather, no hay was put up, the calves were not weaned, and the yearling heifers were not kept away from the bulls. Consequently when the severe weather came the calves sapped the strength of the cows, and the heifers raising two years, heavy with calf and maturing their bodies, were not able to stand it. I cannot understand how everything was allowed to go on so recklessly after the previous year's loss. I asked the stockman how it happened that no preparations were made, and his reply was characteristic, that "the agent would rather provide a diamond ring for the engineer than a toothpick for the stockman."

4. Yes.

5. 7,348.

6. 3,393.

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Subtopic:   BLOOD INDIAN RESERVE
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CON

Richard Smeaton White

Conservative (1867-1942)

*Mr. WHITE:

1 How many leases were granted for grazing* purposes on the northern end of the Blood reserve in 1918 under the Greater Production scheme?

2. Approximately, what was the total acreage covered by said north end leases?

3. How many of said leases fixed a limit as to the number of live stock to be grazed and in such cases how many head of stock were allowed to each section of 640 acres?

4. Were any of the above lessees compelled to fence their leases?

5. How many of the above class of leases, on the Blood reserve in 1918, were free of both fencing conditions and restrictions as to the number of stock brought on to the reserve under them?

6. Did these leases give the holders thereof practically unlimited grazing privileges over the unleased portion of the Blood Reserve?

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Subtopic:   BLOOD INDIAN RESERVE
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UNION

Right Hon. ARTHUR MEIGHEN: (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Unionist

1. 21.

2. 43,299.78 acres.

3. None.

4. No.

5. All.

6. No.

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Subtopic:   BLOOD INDIAN RESERVE
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L LIB

*Mr. MOLLOY:

Laurier Liberal

1. Was that southwestern portion of the Blood reserve containing approximately 40,000 acres and habitually used by the Blood Indians for hay-making and as a winter grazing range for their cattle leased by an official of the Indian Department to white men in 1918?

2. Was access to the said land by the Blood Indian cattle herds shut off by the construction in 191*8 of a 12 or 13 mile fence dividing the said area from the rest of the reserve?

3. Has the attention of the Government been called to the fact that in 1918 a large portion of the hay land, upon which the Blood Indians were dependent for the feeding of their cattle and the support of their families, was leased by the Indian Department to white men?

4. What quantity of hay was removed from the Blood Reserve by the Greater Production lessees during the fiscal year 1918-19?

5. What quantity of hay and straw was removed from the Blood reserve by the "Production" lessees during the fiscal year 1919-20?

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Subtopic:   BLOOD INDIAN RESERVE
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UNION

Right Hon. ARTHUR MEIGHEN: (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Unionist

1. Grazing leases were granted on the southwest portion of the Blood Reserve in 1918 in order to produce revenue for the Blood Indians, ample areas remaining for the support of the Indians' cattle.

2. No.

3. Answered by Nos. 1 and 2.

4 and 5. The Department of Indian Affairs has no information that any quantity of hay and straw was removed from the Blood reserve by the greater production lessees during the fiscal years 1918-19 and 1919-20.

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Subtopic:   BLOOD INDIAN RESERVE
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UNION

Mr. SHAW:

Unionist

1. In what year did the Blood Indians first engage in the business of raising cattle?

2. How many cattle were supplied by the Department of Indian Affairs in that year?

3. Who took charge of the Blood reserve in

1903, and when did he leave the service of the department? -

4. How many cattle were on the reserve when he took charge?

5. How many cattle did he report to be on the reserve in 1905, 1906, and 1907 respectively?

6^ How many cattle were found to be on the reserve when he left the service of the department?

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Subtopic:   BLOOD INDIAN RESERVE
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UNION

Right Hon. Mr. MEIGHEN: (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Unionist

1. 1894.

2. 50.

3. R. N. Wilson was appointed by Order in Council of December 21, 1903, to take charge from February 1, 1904. His resignation was accepted June 15, 1911.

4. 3,519.

5. 1905, 6,000; 1906, 7,500; 1907, 7,621.

6. 3,393.

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Subtopic:   BLOOD INDIAN RESERVE
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CAMP BORDEN-AEROPLANES

L LIB

Mr. SINCLAIR (Guysborough):

Laurier Liberal

1. How many aeroplanes are now in commission at Camp Borden?

2. What was their total initial cost?

3. How much was expended on repairs during the year 1920?

4. What was the total expenditure for the staff and the wages of all operators and employees for the year 1920?

5. How many planes were wrecked at this camp since the armistice?

6. What has been the total expenditure for all purposes in connection with the maintenance of this camp since the armistice?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CAMP BORDEN-AEROPLANES
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April 12, 1921