April 4, 1921

REPORTS AND PAPERS


Annual Report of the Veterinary Director General for the years ended March 31, 1919, and March 31, 1920.-Hon. Mr. Tolmie. Fourth Volume of the Auditor General's Report.-Right Hon. Mr. Meighen. Correspondence relating to the appointment of Sir Thomas White as arbitrator on the Grand Trunk arbitration.-Right Hon. Mr. Meighen. Copy of Order in Council respecting the .appointment of a manager for the Parliamentary restaurant.-Mr. Speaker.


PRIVATE BILLS

FIRST READINGS


Bill No. 53, to incorporate the Fort Smith Railway Company.-Mr. Douglas (Strathcona). Bill No. 51 (from the Senate), for the relief of George Elmor Glossop.-Mr. Copp.


SECOND READINGS


Bill No. 45 (from the Senate), for the relief of William Henry Coulson.-Mr. Hocken. Bill No. 46 (from the Senate), for the relief of Elizabeth Alexander.-Mr. Douglas (Strathcona). Bill No. 47 (from the Senate), for the relief of William Gleaves Doyle.-Mr. Best. Bill No. 49 (from the Senate), for the relief of Dorothy Mearuel Score.-Mr. Fripp. Bill No. 50 (from the Senate), for the relief of Henry William Maynard.-Mr. Hocken.


RAILWAY ACT AMENDMENT

PROPOSAL TO PLACE INLAND MERCHANT SHIPPING UNDER RAILWAY COMMISSION


Mr. J. E. ARMSTRONG (East Lamb-ton) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 54, to amend the Railway Act, 1919. He said: This Bill is similar to the one that I introduced last year.


?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Hear, hear.

Topic:   RAILWAY ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   PROPOSAL TO PLACE INLAND MERCHANT SHIPPING UNDER RAILWAY COMMISSION
Permalink
UNION

Joseph Elijah Armstrong

Unionist

Mr. ARMSTRONG:

It is coming to a

time when this Bill is looked upon possibly as a hardy annual, but I hope it is coming to a time when members on both sides of this House will appreciate to the full the importance of the measure and will vote to place it on the statute book. The purport of the Bill is to bring boats on our inland waters under the control of the Railway Commission. I have eliminated an important clause in the former Bill dealing with the question of controlling boats on our coasts. This Bill confines the control entirely to boats on our inland waters, and there is in the Bill a clause defining the limits contained in our statutes regarding inland waters. I do not need to tell members of the House that I hope the Bill will receive their approval, and that it will be placed on the statute books during the present session.

Topic:   RAILWAY ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   PROPOSAL TO PLACE INLAND MERCHANT SHIPPING UNDER RAILWAY COMMISSION
Permalink

FERTILIZER ACT, 1909, AMENDMENT


Mr. THOMAS W. CALDWELL (Victoria and Carleton) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 55, to amend the Fertilizer Act, 1909. He said: It is not proposed by this Bill to make any drastic changes in the Fertilizer Act. This Bill is simply to provide for the better marking of commercial fertilizer which is offered for sale, so that the farmer may know exactly what he is purchasing. It is proposed that the manufacturer of fertilizers shall specify the material from which his different chemicals are derived, also the available phosphoric acid in the contents of his fertilizer. I believe a majority of the fertilizer manufacturers of Canada would be in favour of this amendment, from the very fact that a few unscrupulous manufacturers of fertilizer are putting into their compounds ingredients which are not plant food, such as ground leather, and mustard seeds, which have a large content of ammonia. Motion agreed to, and Bill read the first time.


IMMIGRATION ACT AMENDMENT-DEPORTATION


Mr. ERNEST LAPOINTE (Quebec East) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 56, to amend the Immigration Act (deportation of undesirable persons). He said: The object of this Bill is to repeal certain provisions of the Act passed by this Parliament during the session of 1919. The most important provision of which repeal is asked is that part of the Act which gives authority to deport, without the form of a trial, persons who are under the law Canadian citizens. This Bill is similar to a Bill which was introduced last year by the Government in the Senate and which was rejected there in committee. At that time I asked the Prime Minister whether the Government would introduce the Bill in . this House, and I was told that the Bill, having failed in the Senate, could not be brought into this House in the same session. This session I have waited until to-day expecting that the Government would introduce the Bill again, and I may add that I would be glad to give way, if they will accept the Bill as their own and proceed with it as a Government measure. Motion agreed to, and Bill read the first Motion agreed to, and Bill read the time. first time.


GRAND TRUNK ARBITRATION


On the Orders of the Day:


L LIB

Charles Murphy

Laurier Liberal

Hon. CHARLES MURPHY (Russell):

In view of the published announcement that the Grand Trunk railway arbitration proceedings will not be completed on the 9th of the present month, is it the intention of the Government to have the time for completing the award extended?

Topic:   GRAND TRUNK ARBITRATION
Permalink
UNION

Arthur Meighen (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Unionist

Right Hon. ARTHUR MEIGHEN (Prime Minister) :

The Government has not decided the question as to the extension of the award. Correspondence is now passing on the subject.

Topic:   GRAND TRUNK ARBITRATION
Permalink

April 4, 1921