February 21, 1921

L LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux

Laurier Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX:

The case is as absurd as that. More than that, it would be a very strange position for Canada to be in. When the British Ambassador was in Washington discussing highly confidential questions with the American Secretary of State, how would he like to have a third party intervene?' It would lead to endless embroilments and endless quarrels between Canada and the Mother Country. I say that in the best interests of Canada and the Mother Country the appointment of a Canadian ambassador to Washington is not to-be desired. But, really, we need waste no time in discussing the desirability of having one, for he will never be appointed.

The object of Mr. Amery's visit last summer was very easy to divine, and there has appeared enough in the press of Great Britain and enough has been hinted on the floor of the House at Westminster to dispose of the question forever. But I say

the policy of every true Canadian statesman, and I hope they will be adopted by the leader of the Government. At all events I know that they will ever be the watchwords of the Liberal party.

Topic:   W. J. T UPPER,
Permalink
UNION

Charles Joseph Doherty (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Unionist

Right Hon. C. J. DOHERTY (Minister of Justice) :

Mr. Speaker at;this hour of the evening I hardly feel that I can fairly undertake to follow the hon. gentleman over the vast extent of territory that he has covered in treating the numerous questions with which he has dealt. I very much regret that I shall not be able to take the matter up at this moment, and I must necessarily, in consequence, leave him to be haunted through this night by those terrible nightmares in which he sees with terrible dread, a centralized authority grasping Canada and also sees this country standing out as a nation. The hon. gentleman has a most awful dread of Canada being a nation. I am sorry for that, but I feel I will he able to do something, at all events, to carry conviction to him that that is the fact, and perhaps something to modify the terrors that, in his mind, surround that position. I hope to be able to do that, but I fear that at this hour I shall have to postpone the task until to-morrow, and so I can only wish him the pleasantest dreams a man so obsessed may have, and beg to move, Mr. Speaker, the adjournment of the Debate.

Topic:   W. J. T UPPER,
Permalink

Motion agreed to. On the Motion of Rt. Hon. Mr. Doherty for the adjournment of the House.


UNI L

William Stevens Fielding

Unionist (Liberal)

Mr. FIELDING:

Before the House adjourns I have a suggestion or a request to make to the Minister of Justice. In view of the several important speeches that have been made, and the immediate prospect of the making of others, touching the League of Nations, I think it is most desirable that the House should be in possession of further information with regard to the appointment of the delegates who attended the Geneva Conference. My suggestion, therefore, is that without waiting for a formal motion, which could only come at a later stage, my right hon. friend should bring down immediately the Orders in Council and instructions respecting the appointment of the delegates. We would then have a clear conception of the matter.

I think it would be better that my right hon. friend should do that now and not wait until a motion for these papers is placed on the Order Paper. I hope that my rt. hon. friend will be able to do as I suggest.

Topic:   W. J. T UPPER,
Permalink
UNION

Charles Joseph Doherty (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Unionist

Mr. DOHERTY:

At the present moment I see no objection to its being done, and I will bear the request in mind.

Motion agreed to and House adjourned at 10.30. p.m.

Tuesday, February 22, 1921

Topic:   W. J. T UPPER,
Permalink

February 21, 1921