June 18, 1920

UNI L

John Flaws Reid

Unionist (Liberal)

Mr. J. D. REID:

Certainly the Federal Government should assist if this were a low level bridge. But a highway 3 p.m. bridge can be built at Ste.

Anne's without interfering with navigation in any way. The bridge is going to be a high level bridge. The hon. member shakes his head.

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UNI L

John Flaws Reid

Unionist (Liberal)

Mr. J. D. REID:

Of course, he can use the argument that it is to be a low level bridge, but I know the location well, and the connection required could be obtained at the least possible expenditure by simply putting a roadway between the Canadian Pacific and the Grand Trunk bridges. The hon. member may say that the bridge will be built across the canal to get the necessary item put in the Estimates, but I am sure no engineer would advise the building of such a bridge. I am convinced that the advice would be to take advantage of the two railway bridges and build the highway bridge between them.

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L LIB

Gustave Benjamin Boyer

Laurier Liberal

Mr. BOYER:

We asked the Canadian

Pacific Railway Company and the Grand Trunk Railway Company for permission to construct a bridge betwen the two railway bridges. The Canadian Pacific Railway Company was ready to allow us to do so, but the Grand Trunk Railway Company refused. No doubt such a bridge would be less expensive, but, apart from the refusal of the Grand Trunk Railway Company it *is feared) that a highway between the two railway bridges would be very difficult to

keep open during the winter on account of the snow drifting there. If we go below the railway bridges we must cross the canal, and then the Federal Government should certainly pay. I wish to know if any assistance will be given.

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UNI L

John Flaws Reid

Unionist (Liberal)

Mr. J. D. REID:

I would not want to agree to build a low level bridge that for all time to come we would have to maintain and operate over the canal. Of course, I am not putting my judgment against that of any engineers who may look over the situation, but my advice would be to build the bridge either between the two railway bridges or on either side of them. If the Canadian Pacific Railway are willing to agree to its bridge being made use of, I will take the matter up with the Grand Trunk Railway Company and see whether they too will agree to the use of their bridge so that the highway may be constructed between the two bridges.

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Gustave Benjamin Boyer

Laurier Liberal

Mr. BOYER:

There is another objection to building between the two railway bridges, and that is the great cost of building the approaches, which is a very serious objection. However, if the minister can convince thp Grand Trunk Railway Company of the feasibility of this highway bridge between the two railway bridges, I would like to know if the Government will help in any way towards the cost of construction. The first estimate was $300,000. The minister himself told me that we must add a large sum to that estimate. Supposing the bridge will cost $500,000, and the province of Quebec will contribute $250,000, then the municipalities would have to contribute the balance, if the Federal Government does not assist. But the municipalities are not able to do so. Already they have expended nearly a million dollars on improved highways, and in that way they are setting a good example to the country. The proposed bridge will be used not only for local traffic, but for interprovincial traffic, for this will be the connecting link of the provincial highways between Toronto and Montreal. Therefore it is only reasonable that we should have assistance from the Federal Government.

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UNI L

John Flaws Reid

Unionist (Liberal)

Mr. J. D. REID:

The Quebec Government should take this matter up with the Ontario Government. This bridge is only a few miles from the main highway of the province, and if any contribution should be given, it certainly should come from the provincial governments and not from the Dominion Government. The hon. member

says that the Quebec Government will contribute one-half the amount.

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UNI L

John Flaws Reid

Unionist (Liberal)

Mr. J. D. REID:

From the information I have I understand that the local municipalities are ready to subscribe the rest.

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UNI L

John Flaws Reid

Unionist (Liberal)

Mr. J. D. REID:

The municipalities are willing to do that provided they are allowed to collect tolls in repayment of the portion they contribute. That would settle the trouble. I -would suggest that the several local municipalities form themselves into a corporation to build this connecting link as a toll road and obtain powers under their charter to levy tolls until they have recouped themselves their capital expenditure. There is a heavy tourist traffic in this district and in this way they will be able to carry out their undertaking without seeking assistance from the Dominion Treasury.

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UNI L

John Flaws Reid

Unionist (Liberal)

Mr. J. D. REID:

The bridge alt Banff

is our own property, and we canont get any aid from the province of Alberta in connection with it.

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L LIB

David Arthur Lafortune

Laurier Liberal

Mr. LAFORTUNE:

The question of building the proposed bridges alt Ste. Anne and Vaudreuil has been a subject of discussion for the paslt fifty years. I remember years and years ago when the late Hon. Mr. Laflamme and the late Mr. Justice Girou-ard, who formerly represented Jacques Cartier, which I now have the honour to represent, were discussing the question of Ithose bridges. At every election contest, if one or the other was elected, he promised that he was certain to have the bridges constructed. The Hon. Mr# Laflamme was elected twice; the Hon. Mr. Girouard was eledted three times, but the bridges have not yet been constructed. I was elected for Jacques Cartier for the first time in 1911, having previously represented Montcalm, and I pledged my word of honour that if I were eledted, the bridges would be built. In that I followed the example of and the declaration given by the late Hon. F. D. Monk, when he represented Jacques Cartier. Every time he was elected from 1896 to 1911, the same promises were made, but no bridge has been built. The same difficulty has always arisen. I agree, perhaps for the first time, with the minister; he would do a great favour and

render great services to my electors if he would do what he has just stated should be done. I discussed the matter with the late Mr. Vallee, chief engineer of Quebec province, and he was of opinion that the two railway bridges now in existence are sufficiently strong to have a passerelle between them. In the present state of the finances of the country, I would suggest to the minister that that should be constructed so as to render a service to the electors of Jacques Cartier, Ste. Anne, Vaudreuil and all the surrounding country. When we are not able to get a full loaf, we are prepared to take half a loaf, and laiter on, when the Liberal party comes into power-and I hope that will not be very long-we shall be able to do something else. But for the present the minister should do what he has just stated, namely, try to help us to get that highway bridge constructed by using the two railway bridges already built. This is not a provincial question, because these two bridges are a matter of interest to the whole Dominion. The minister has built a very large military hospital at Ste. Anne, and my electors and I are very glad that he has done so. Millions were spent there and the expenditure was necessary. This is a Dominion military hospital receiving patients from every part of the Dominion, but how can you reach that military hospital at Ste. Anne when there is no bridge? Millions and millions of dollars were spent at Macdonald College at Ste. Anne, the best institution in the whole Dominion of Canada. The late Sir William Macdonald gave five or six million dollars to that college. In a few days we shall have an international agricultural concours there with representatives from every province, and in my opinion the Government should see that provision is made that Macdonald College, and the military hospital built by the Government, may be reached from every province. When the late Mr. Monk represented Jacques Cartier with so much honour to himself and with so much benefit to the electors of that constituency, he declared publicly in my presence at a large public meeting held in Jacques Cartier-and he was a man who never failed in his word-that the duty of the Federal Government was to do its best to have those two bridges built. I am sure that the minister will see that full justice is done to the electors of Jacques Cartier, not because I represent that constituency, not because I ask for this, but because it is a measure of simple justice to the

travelling public of the Dominion of Canada.

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UFOL

John Wilfred Kennedy

United Farmers of Ontario-Labour

Mr. KENNEDY (Glengarry and Stormont) :

Those bridges at Ste. Anne and

Vaudreuil are more or less national in their character on account of the traffic they would carry. A very important highway, certainly one of the most important in Ontario, is being constructed along the north shore of lake Ontario and down along the north shore of the river St. Lawrence to the Quebec boundary. Another is being projected from Ottawa to Montreal, and a third county-provincial highway is running midway between the river Ottawa and the river St. Lawrence, likewise leading to the Quebec boundary. Those three highways converge towards Ste. Anne and Vaudreuil where those bridges are projected. Montreal being the commercial metropolis of this country, those bridges will carry a very large tourist traffic coming from Ottawa, Toronto and points west, and on that Account, those bridges should be considered as more or less national in their character. The minister argues that this is a matter for the provinces to finance; he has pointed out that the province of Ontario should contribute something towards the building of those bridges; but I do not think that that province should be expected to assume any financial obligation as regards a bridge of that kind as it would be wholly within the limits of another province. In view of the nalture of the traffic which those bridges would be expected to bear, the Federal Government should assist in some degree towards the construction of those bridges. The -communities in thait portion of Ontario feel that those bridges will be a great benefit to this country in diverting through Onltario tourist traffic which now goes through the State of New York.

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L LIB

Daniel Duncan McKenzie

Laurier Liberal

Mr. McKENZIE:

Is it necessary to spend this $3,000 for repairs if we build the new 1 ridge at Banff.

Mr. ,1. D. REID: Yes, because it will be some time before the new bridge is ready.

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Daniel Duncan McKenzie

Laurier Liberal

Mr. McKENZIE:

Has there been a report that if these repairs were made the present bridge would do for this year?

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UNI L

John Flaws Reid

Unionist (Liberal)

Mr. J. D. REID:

These repairs are required so that the old bridge can be used till the new. one is ready.

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L LIB

Daniel Duncan McKenzie

Laurier Liberal

Mr. McKENZIE:

I never heard of a town being conducted by the Dominion Govern-

ment. It has come out incidentally that the town of Banff is conducted entirely under the supervision and control of the Department of the Interior. The people there must have schools and the usual institutions of a town. How is the money provided?

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UNI L

John Flaws Reid

Unionist (Liberal)

Mr. J. D. REID:

The hon. member would find that information in the annual report of the Parks Branch, which is laid on the Table nvery year. Banff is not a new town. It has been in existence for twenty-five or thirty years.

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June 18, 1920