March 18, 1920

UNION

Newton Wesley Rowell (Minister presiding over the Department of Health; President of the Privy Council)

Unionist

Mr. ROWELL:

The hon. member evidently did not hear me

Topic:   CIVIL SERVICE CLASSIFICATION.
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UNION
UNION

Newton Wesley Rowell (Minister presiding over the Department of Health; President of the Privy Council)

Unionist

Mr. ROWELL:

What I said was that the deputy ministers were consulted with reference to the classification and so on. I did not say that they had approved it, because I do not know whether they did or not.

Topic:   CIVIL SERVICE CLASSIFICATION.
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UNION

Alfred Ernest Fripp

Unionist

Mr. FRIPP:

The deputy ministers were consulted as to the form of the index cards. They approved the information which each clerk gave; they simply gave their approval as to his correctly stating his name, age, work and salary; but they have never approved, and I do not think they approve the classification as prepared for their staffs. If I understood the President of the Privy Council correctly, he said there was promotion provided for. I should like to inform him that if this classification goes into effect, there will be practically no promotion for civil servants. You might as well write above the doors of our departmental buildings " Abandon hope all ye who enter here," because these classifications are absolutely fixed. A man is put into a certain grade and his duties are defined, and the deputy finds that when he says to a clerk: " I have work for you to do in another room," the clerk replies: "Oh, I do not work there; my duties are so and so and my salary is so and so." You have absolutely lost control of your staff.

Topic:   CIVIL SERVICE CLASSIFICATION.
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UNION

Michael Steele

Unionist

Mr. STEELE:

When a vacancy occurs, is there any opportunity for promotion?

Topic:   CIVIL SERVICE CLASSIFICATION.
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UNION

Alfred Ernest Fripp

Unionist

Mr. FRIPP:

I was going to give an example of what happens when a vacancy occurs. A deputy minister informed me that he had a messenger in his department

and in another branch of the department, the Weights and Measures Branch, he desired a man to clean scales. He wrote to the Civil Service Commission , recommending that the messenger be promoted to that position which meant a promotion of $50 a year in his salary. What do you suppose was the reply he got from the Civil Service Commission? They replied that there could be no promotion; that the job of cleaning scales was a new one, and that they would have to advertise for a new man. Thus under the system prepared by these experts, a new man has to be appointed whereas under the old system the services of a man already in the employ of the department could have been utilized.

With regard to the point mentioned by the hon. member for Cape Breton North (Mr. McKenzie) and the reference I made to the Printing Bureau, I have it from the head of the Bureau, and from the Assistant King's Printer that as to the men who were laid off by this so-called expert, their approval was not given, and that they did not give their opinion that the men who were dismissed from that service were efficient or inefficient. Surely that is a state of affairs that ought not to be allowed to prevail in the Civil Service of Canada. If there is to be a lay-off the deputy minister, or in the case of the Printing Bureau, the King's Printer, is surely the best man to decide who should go and who should remain. That is the point I endeavoured to make. Action was taken in this very highhanded way by this servant of Arthur Young and Company and approved of by the Civil Service Commission.

In conclusion, my desire in bringing this matter to the attention of the House was simply to promote efficiency in the Civil Service of Canada. I know, as I said at the outset of my remarks, that ninety per cent of the civil servants are dissatisfied, and there is uniest manifested in each department by reason of the re-classification. I therefore beg the Government to dispense with the services of these gentlemen from the United States, and ask the deputy ministers to make a report and clean up the re-classification in order that we may have an efficient Civil Service not only in Ottawa but throughout the whole Dominion.

Motion of Mr. Fripp agreed to.

Topic:   CIVIL SERVICE CLASSIFICATION.
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WATER SUPPLY TO GOVERNMENT BUILDINGS IN OTTAWA.

AGREEMENT WITH OTTAWA CITY.


On the motion of Hon. N. W. ROWELL (President of the Privy Council) for the Minister of Public Works, it was ordered that the House do to-morrow go into Committee of the Whole to consider a proposed resolution respecting an agreement between the Government and the city of Ottawa concerning the water supply to Government buildings in Ottawa.


LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Hon. MACKENZIE KING:

Who is the Minister of Public Works?

Topic:   WATER SUPPLY TO GOVERNMENT BUILDINGS IN OTTAWA.
Subtopic:   AGREEMENT WITH OTTAWA CITY.
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UNION

Newton Wesley Rowell (Minister presiding over the Department of Health; President of the Privy Council)

Unionist

Hon. N. W. ROWELL:

Hon. J. D. Reid.

Topic:   WATER SUPPLY TO GOVERNMENT BUILDINGS IN OTTAWA.
Subtopic:   AGREEMENT WITH OTTAWA CITY.
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THE OPIUM AND DRUG ACT AMENDMENT.


On the motion of Hon. N. W. Rowell (Minister of Health), the House went into Committee on the following proposed resolution, Mr. Boivin in the Chair. 1. That the Minister presiding over the Department of Health shall have power to issue licenses for the import, export, sale, manufacture and distribution of any drug; to name the ports or places in Canada where any drug may be exported or imported; to prescribe.the manner in which any raw opium, prepared opium or any drug is packed and marked for export; to prescribe the record that shall he kept by any licensee in connection with the export, import, receipt, sale, disposal and distribution of the drug or drugs mentioned in such license, and to make alf convenient and necessary regulations with respect to the issue, duration, terms and forms of the several licenses that may be issued and the payment of fees for such licenses, not exceeding the sum of twenty-five dollars for any license, and no such license shall continue in force for a longer period than one year. 2. That penalties may be imposed for the violation of the provisions of the proposed legislation. * 3. -That a duly authorized and practising physician, veterinary surgeon or dentist, or a druggist carrying on a bona fide business In a shop or store may be excepted from penalties imposed for manufacturing, selling or distributing drugs without license, but every druggist shall keep such records of the amount of any drug received or sold by him as the Minister may by regulation prescribe. 4. That the penalties imposed for manufacturing, selling or distributing drugs without license, and for not keeping records, shall not apply to any liniments, ointments or other preparations which are prepared for external skin use only, which do not contain cocaine, or any of its salts or preparations; provided, however, that the Governor in Council may by regulation apply the proposed provisions to any preparation named and prescribed in such regulation. *


L LIB

Henri Sévérin Béland

Laurier Liberal

Mr. BELAND:

Will the minister explain the resolution.

Topic:   WATER SUPPLY TO GOVERNMENT BUILDINGS IN OTTAWA.
Subtopic:   THE OPIUM AND DRUG ACT AMENDMENT.
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UNION

Newton Wesley Rowell (Minister presiding over the Department of Health; President of the Privy Council)

Unionist

Mr. ROWELL:

The object of the proposed resolution is to put into legislative form the conclusions embodied in the International Opium Convention signed at The Hague on the 23rd of January, 1912. The

members of the House will recall that by Article 295 of the Treaty of Peace between the Allied and Associated Powers and Germany, provision was made that this International Opium Convention 5 p.m. should be brought into force.

A similar provision was inserted in the Treaty of Peace with Austria and in the Treaty of Peace with Bulgaria. In order that the Committee may have the matter before them I shall read the provision in the Treaty of Peace which relates to this matter. It is Article 295 in the Treaty of Peace with Germany, and Article 174 in the Treaty of Peace with Bulgaria, and reads as follows:

Those of the High Contracting Parties who have not yet signed, or who have signed but not yet ratified, the Opium Convention signed at The Hague on January 23, 1912, agree to bring the said Convention into force, and for this purpose to enact the necessary legislation without delay and in any case within a period of twelve months from the coming into force of the present Treaty.

Furthermore, they agree that ratification of the present Treaty should in the case of Powers which have not yet ratified the Opium Convention be deemed in all respects equivalent to the ratification of that convention and to the signature of the Special Protocol which was opened at The Hague in accordance with the resolutions adopted by the Third Opium Conference in 1914 for bringing the said Convention into force.

For this purpose the Government of the French Republic will communicate to the Government of the Netherlands a certified copy of the protocol of the deposit of ratifications of the present Treaty, and will invite the Government of the Netherlands to accept and deposit the said .certified copy as if it were a deposit of ratifications of the Opium Convention and a signature of the Additional Protocol of 1914.

The inclusion in the Treaties of Peace with enemy countries of this provision has made possible the bringing into operation of the International Opium Convention which was formulated and signed by some of the Powers at the Hague in December 1911 and January 1912.

While the Convention had been signed by a majority of the Powers who took part in the Conference at the Hague, there were still certain important Powers which, up to the meeting of the Peace Conference, had either declined to sign, failed to ratify, or been unwilling to agree that the Treaty should be brought into force. Therefore in view of the great international importance of this Convention which embodied the conclusions of the great Powers of the world as to the measures which were essential to not only restrict but to as far as practicable put an end to the trade in opium, morphia and cocaine, it was desir-

able that it should be brought into force. And the Peace Conference had made enforcement possible.

Perhaps it will be interesting to recall the fact that this Convention really had its inspiration at the International Conference held in Shanghai in the year 1908 and the early part of 1909. At this Conference some twelve nations were represented, and it is an interesting coincidence that my hon. friend the present leader of the Opposition (Mr. King) was the Canadian representative at that Conference which initiated the movement that culminated in the preparation of this Convention and in the agreement at Paris that it should be put into operation.

The Conference at Shanghai agreed to four resolutions; I do not wish to trouble the House with them but I shall give their effect as indicating the basis of this Convention. The first was a recognition of the sincerity of China in its desire to eradicate the production and consumption of opium. Members of the House will realize what the opium trade and traffic has meant to China. Information was given at this Conference at Shanghai that there were more than twenty million addicts to the opium habit in China, and every one knows how serious a menace to the moral, economic and physical welfare of the people of China the opium tiaffic has been. The second resolution was to the effect that each delegate would request his own Government to formulate laws for the gradual suppression of the opium traffic. By the third it was declared that the trade in opium, other than in legitimate ways, was held by nearly all the participants in the Conference to be a matter for prohibition or careful regulation. The fourth declares that as each country finds it feasible to restrict the importation of opium the Conference is of opinion that the export also should be prevented to any country which prohibits its entry. The fifth resolution declares that the manufacture, distribution and sale in each country, except for legitimate purposes, should be drastically dealt with.

As far as Canada is concerned, I think that within a year-or perhaps a little more than a year-after the Conference was held, the existence of the tariff was brought forcibly to the attention of the people by certain riots that occurred on the Pacific coast. In connection with these riots damage was done to the property of Chinese residents in coast cities and the claims they presented to the Government for compensation included

claims for the destruction of important quantities of opium indicating the extent of the trade on the Pacific coast in that deleterious article. The result of the Conference at Shanghai plus the discovery of the conditions existing in Canada, led to the passing of the Act of 1911.

Topic:   WATER SUPPLY TO GOVERNMENT BUILDINGS IN OTTAWA.
Subtopic:   THE OPIUM AND DRUG ACT AMENDMENT.
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

For the sake of recording the order of events accurately, I might say that the situation on the Pacific coast had arisen before the Conference was held. The Canadian Government had the situation on the Pacific coast investigated, a report was made, and an Act was passed by this Pariiament prior to the time at which the Shanghai Conference was held. In consequence of this country having taken action in the matter of the opium traffic, Canada was asked to be represented at the Shanghai Conference.

Topic:   WATER SUPPLY TO GOVERNMENT BUILDINGS IN OTTAWA.
Subtopic:   THE OPIUM AND DRUG ACT AMENDMENT.
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UNION

Newton Wesley Rowell (Minister presiding over the Department of Health; President of the Privy Council)

Unionist

Mr. ROWELL:

I thank my hon. friend for the correction as to the dates. My hon. friend recalls the facts to my mind. It was the Act of 1908 to which I referred.

Topic:   WATER SUPPLY TO GOVERNMENT BUILDINGS IN OTTAWA.
Subtopic:   THE OPIUM AND DRUG ACT AMENDMENT.
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

It is further interesting in this connection to state that the United States' government took cognizance of the Act which this Parliament passed, and at the Shanghai Conference admitted that Canada had really led the way in helping to control the opium traffic in so far as this continent was concerned.

Topic:   WATER SUPPLY TO GOVERNMENT BUILDINGS IN OTTAWA.
Subtopic:   THE OPIUM AND DRUG ACT AMENDMENT.
Permalink
UNION

Newton Wesley Rowell (Minister presiding over the Department of Health; President of the Privy Council)

Unionist

Mr. ROWELL:

I was in error. The riots preceded the Act of 1908 not the Act of 1911. The riots first, then the Act of 1908, the International Conference at Shanghai in 1909 and the legislation following that Conference by this House in 1911-

Topic:   WATER SUPPLY TO GOVERNMENT BUILDINGS IN OTTAWA.
Subtopic:   THE OPIUM AND DRUG ACT AMENDMENT.
Permalink
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

The further

legislation.

Topic:   WATER SUPPLY TO GOVERNMENT BUILDINGS IN OTTAWA.
Subtopic:   THE OPIUM AND DRUG ACT AMENDMENT.
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March 18, 1920