June 23, 1919

THE JUVENILE DELINQUENTS' ACT AMENDMENT.


On the Orders of the Day:


UNION

Samuel Hughes

Unionist

Sir SAM HUGHES (Victoria):

I desire to ask the Acting Minister of Justice when Bill No. 40, to amend the Juvenile Delinquents' Act, will be brought on, as there are a great many members very much interested in it.

Topic:   THE JUVENILE DELINQUENTS' ACT AMENDMENT.
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UNION

Arthur Meighen (Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Unionist

Hon. ARTHUR MEIGHEN (Acting Minister of Justice) :

Bill No. 40 when it was introduced in this House had already been passed by the Senate. As I understood, the Bill had been requested by the Greek Catholic Church, as they wished their children to be disposed of under the Juvenile Delinquents' Act in the same way as Roman Catholic children. I have since found that the Bill did not originate with and was not asked for by that body, but was requested by the Associated Children's Aid Societies of Canada. The representations from the former body were that they did not wish to recognize the authority of the Roman Catholic church, but rather the authority of the Holy Roman See. On that being explained to me by Mr. Gisborne, I immediately took steps to ascertain the attitude of the Greek Catholic church, but .so far I have had nothing come before me to convince me that the people of that church are anxious for the measure. Unless I do hear from them to that effect, I do not propose proceeding further.

Topic:   THE JUVENILE DELINQUENTS' ACT AMENDMENT.
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UNION

Samuel Hughes

Unionist

Sir SAM HUGHES:

In case the hon. minister should receive any such intimation from the Ukranian organizations, will he be good enough to notify those who have expressed an interest in the matter?

Topic:   THE JUVENILE DELINQUENTS' ACT AMENDMENT.
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UNION

Arthur Meighen (Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Unionist

Hon. ARTHUR MEIGHEN:

There is no reason why notice should not be given.

Topic:   THE JUVENILE DELINQUENTS' ACT AMENDMENT.
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INDUSTRIAL UNREST IN CANADA.

WINNIPEG STRIKE)-.RIOTS.

L LIB

Daniel Duncan McKenzie (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Laurier Liberal

Mr. D. D. McKENZIE:

In view of the appalling reports that we get from Winnipeg, is the Acting Minister of Justice able

to tell us anything about the circumstances prevailing there at present?

Topic:   INDUSTRIAL UNREST IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   WINNIPEG STRIKE)-.RIOTS.
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UNION

Arthur Meighen (Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Unionist

Hon. ARTHUR MEIGHEN:

Matters in Winnipeg have been principally dealt with by the Royal North West Mounted Police. The President of the Privy Council will accordingly make a statement.

Hon. NEWTON W. ROWELL: Mr. Speaker, the position of affairs in Winnipeg, particularly as it relates to the part taken by the Royal North West Mounted Police in the incidents of Saturday, is briefly as follows: In the month of May J received a telegram from the Attorney General of Manitoba asking if (the Mounted Police could act in co-operation with the provincial authorities for the preservation of law and order in Winnipeg, in case such action should be necessary owing to the disturbed conditions prevailing there. I thereupon caused instructions to be given to the Commissioner of the Mounted Police in the following terms:

Attorney General of Manitoba has requested that force should assist in maintaining law and order in Winnipeg' if required. Therefore kindly instruct local officer Mounted Police to co-operate with Attorney General if required by him.

At the same time I sent a letter to the Attorney General of Manitoba, and, in fact, a similar letter to the Attorney General of each of the Western provinces, to this effect:

The Government here is anxious to render every assistance in its power to the provincial and municipal authorities in maintaining law and order, and protecting the lives and property of citizens from mob or revolutionary violence.

We, of course, fully recognize that the initiative and responsibility in connection with the maintenance of law and order in each province rest with the Provincial Government, and with the municipal authorities, and that any action we might take should be in co-operation with, and at the request of. the provincial authorities. I write this to assure you that anything the Federal Government can do to assist in maintaining law and order in your province will he most cheerfully done, both from the standpoint of the military authorities and of the Royal Northwest Mounted Police.

It was with the full concurrence of the Minister of Militia and Defence (Major General Mewburn) that I stated in that letter [DOT] that the military authorities would cooperate with the provincial and municipal authorities in maintaining law and order.

Topic:   INDUSTRIAL UNREST IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   WINNIPEG STRIKE)-.RIOTS.
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UNION

Samuel Hughes

Unionist

Sir SAM HUGHES:

The minister has no authority in the premises. These troops must go out if they arc called out by the provincial authorities, must they not?

Topic:   INDUSTRIAL UNREST IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   WINNIPEG STRIKE)-.RIOTS.
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UNION

Newton Wesley Rowell (Minister presiding over the Department of Health; President of the Privy Council)

Unionist

Mr. N. W. ROWELL:

I have just intimated that I wrote that letter with the full authority and co-operation of the Minister of Militia and Defence in advising that the Federal Government, through the Military and through the Mounted Police, would cooperate with the provincial and municipal authorities in maintaining law and order. Any action, of course, would have to be taken under the provisions of the law which defines the conditions under which the militia may co-operate.

Topic:   INDUSTRIAL UNREST IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   WINNIPEG STRIKE)-.RIOTS.
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UNION

Samuel Hughes

Unionist

Sir SAM HUGHES:

Whether the Government is willing or not.

Topic:   INDUSTRIAL UNREST IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   WINNIPEG STRIKE)-.RIOTS.
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UNION

Newton Wesley Rowell (Minister presiding over the Department of Health; President of the Privy Council)

Unionist

Mr. ROWELL:

Quite so. The militia could he called out at the request of the municipal authorities; but this was simply to indicate the attitude of the Government in reference to these matters.

I understand that on Friday evening last a mass meeting of strikers, in which there were some five hundred or more returned soldiers, decided that they would on Saturday parade the streets of Winnipeg, notwithstanding the proclamation of the mayor that no parades should be permitted. They sent word to the Minister of Labour (Hon. G. D. Robertson) that they intended to meet in Victoria Park at 2.30 p.m. on Saturday, and that they would parade from there to the Royal Alexandria Hotel, where the minister was staying, and that the minister would there address them, on .pain of violence if he refused. The Minister of Labour, desiring to avoid any possibility of a conflict with returned soldiers, or any possibility of a violation of the mayor's proclamation, sent word to the strikers, through the solicitor for the strike committee, that he himself would go to Victoria Park on Saturday at 2.30, and there address the strikers. That, however, apparently was not satisfactory to them, and the committee requested a meeting on Saturday morning which was duly held, and at which the Minister of Labour, Commissioner Perry of the Mounted Police, and Mr. Andrews, representing the Department of Justice, were present. The committee insisted that the parade would go on unless the strike were settled before 2 o'clock; the street railways, which had been operating for several days, were stopped, and the minister and others should address them, on 'Saturday afternoon at the Industrial Bureau, of which they would take possession. The mayor intimated that under no conditions would the proclamation against parades be withdrawn; that it must be strictly observed, and that he would not discontinue the street car service. The

Minister of Labour intimated that it would not be possible to secure a settlement of the strike within the time limited, namely, 2 o'clock that afternoon; but he promised if the mayor's proclamation was respected and the parade cancelled that he would endeavour to secure for them the Industrial Bureau, in which to hold their meeting; and said that he would be prepared to address them there. Mr. Andrews left the conference for the purpose of securing the Industrial Bureau for the committee, and succeeded in doing so; hut before he got back the trouble had commenced. The strikers- at least a group of them-insisted that the parade should go on. The mayor, with the approval of the Attorney General and in his presence, went to the headquarters of the Mounted Police and asked their co-operation in preserving law and order. That was the joint request of the mayor of the city, representing the municipal authority, and the Attorney General of the province, representing the provincial authority.

Topic:   INDUSTRIAL UNREST IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   WINNIPEG STRIKE)-.RIOTS.
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UNION

Samuel Hughes

Unionist

Sir SAM HUGHES:

It was done in legr.l form?

Topic:   INDUSTRIAL UNREST IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   WINNIPEG STRIKE)-.RIOTS.
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UNION

Newton Wesley Rowell (Minister presiding over the Department of Health; President of the Privy Council)

Unionist

Mr. N. W. ROWELL:

It was done in proper form, yes. The Mounted Police were thereupon called out, and, as has already been stated in the press, moved down Main street, endeavouring to disperse the crowd. There was evidence of violence almost at once-so much so that the mayor read the Riot Act and then proceeded to militia headquarters and asked that the militia be called out. As I say, there were acts of violence; a street car which was passing down the track was seriously broken up; bricks, stones, and other missiles were thrown at the Mounted Police, and shots were fired from the mob. As a result, there were several casualties, and the condition was such that the officer in command of the police felt it absolutely necessary, as a matter of self-defence, that the police should fire. This they did, with the result that there were a number of casualties. The latest report is that the total number of casualties was thirty-four, of which sixteen were in the Mounted Police; that would make eighteen casualties in the mob. I am glad to say that the casualties among the police, though at first some were considered serious, have proved not to be so serious. All the police are out of the hospital now with the exception of one, who was more seriously injured than the others. Of the men in the crowd who .suffered casualties, one was killed and one or two were probably seriously injured; as to the condition of the others, we have no specific

information. I should add that the militia came immediately to the assistance of the Mounted Police and the mob was dispersed in the course of half an hour or a little more. Since that time the city has been quiet; there has been no trouble since the dispersal of the mob.

Let me repeat that the first shots were fired by the paraders or those associated . with them, and that Mounted Police fired only in self-defence. The information that we have is that the police acted with great coolness, great courage and great patience, as is characteristic of men of the Royal Northwest Mounted Police. What is true of the police, is equally true of the militia. As a matter of fact, I believe that the majority of the police were returned men, as were large numbers of the militia who were called out. Up to 7.30 p.m. last evening some 80 arrests had been made by the police.

Every one must regret that life has been lost on this occasion. Every one must regret that serious casualties have been sustained, but 'I am sure that members of the House and the sane and thoughtful people of the country will agree that law and order in Canada must be maintained. The sooner all classes fully recognize that it is the intention of the Federal Government and of the provincial and various municipal governments in Canada to maintain law and order and to protect life and property, the more speedily we shall reach a common understanding in relation to all matters affecting the public interest.

Topic:   INDUSTRIAL UNREST IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   WINNIPEG STRIKE)-.RIOTS.
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L LIB

Frank S. Cahill

Laurier Liberal

Mr. CAHILL:

It is reported in the

Ottawa Citizen this morning that returned soldiers in favour of the strikers started the parade; that crowds joined and a clash ensued. Ts there any truth in the report that the parade was led by returned soldiers?

Topic:   INDUSTRIAL UNREST IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   WINNIPEG STRIKE)-.RIOTS.
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UNION

Newton Wesley Rowell (Minister presiding over the Department of Health; President of the Privy Council)

Unionist

Mr. ROWELL:

As I have already intimated, the group that presented the request to the minister was composed largely of returned soldiers, who, however, constitute only a small section of the returned soldiers in Winnipeg, the great majority of whom are entirely out of sympathy with the action of this group in starting the trouble.

Topic:   INDUSTRIAL UNREST IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   WINNIPEG STRIKE)-.RIOTS.
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UNION

Henry Arthur Mackie

Unionist

Mr. H. A. MACKIE (East Edmonton):

Is the strike in Winnipeg being continued on a demand for centralized power for collective bargaining?

Topic:   INDUSTRIAL UNREST IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   WINNIPEG STRIKE)-.RIOTS.
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UNION

Alexander Kenneth Maclean (Minister Without Portfolio)

Unionist

Hon. A. K. MACLEAN (Acting Minister of Labour):

The demand for collective bargaining is still dominant, I would imagine, in the minds of the strikers; they are still

insisting upon it as one of the terms of settlement. The Minister of Labour, who is still in Winnipeg is in constant negotiation with representatives of employers and employees endeavouring to reach a settlement of the main issues which were the original cause of the strike.

Topic:   INDUSTRIAL UNREST IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   WINNIPEG STRIKE)-.RIOTS.
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June 23, 1919