April 25, 1919

UNION

James Alexander Calder (Minister of Immigration and Colonization)

Unionist

Mr. CALDEE:

No. The bond is not done away with. This makes provision for a

deposit of money in place of the bond if it is thought desirable.

At six o'clock the Committee took recess.

After Recess.

The Committee resumed at eight o'clock.

Topic:   IMMIGRATION ACT AMENDMENT.
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UNI L

Sanford Johnston Crowe

Unionist (Liberal)

Mr. CEOWE:

Does the minister intend

to insert a clause, or clauses, dealing with Chinese and Japanese immigration. I understand there is an agreement with the Japanese Government in reference to a certain number of Japanese labourers coming info Canada every year, and that there is a separate Act dealing with Chinese immigration. I think that both Japanese and Chinese immigration should be dealt with in this Act. The matter should be consolidated under one Act. If that were done it would be far easier to handle.

Topic:   IMMIGRATION ACT AMENDMENT.
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UNION

James Alexander Calder (Minister of Immigration and Colonization)

Unionist

Mr. CALDEE:

I am scarcely in a position to answer the question at the present. I suggested the other day the advisability of abolishing the head tax. If that is done very considerable amendments will have to be made to the Chinese Immigration Act, but until I have had time to further consider that question I am not in a position to make a statement to the Committee. As to immigration from Japan, I scarcely think any special legislation is necessary. There is no intention on the part of the Government to make any change in the agreement that has been in force for some years.

On section 14-duty of officers and municipal officials to send complaints to the minister regarding undesirable immigrants:

Topic:   IMMIGRATION ACT AMENDMENT.
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UNION

James Alexander Calder (Minister of Immigration and Colonization)

Unionist

Mr. CALDEE:

Under the law as it exists, and the amendments, we provide for certain prohibited classes. This section merely provides that if any of these classes arrive in Canada, and information thereof is in the possession of municipal officers, that information shall be forwarded to the department.

Mr. JACOB'S: I understand that this

clause makes it incumbent on the secretary of a municipality to inform the department of the existence in that municipality of these particular people?

Topic:   IMMIGRATION ACT AMENDMENT.
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UNION

James Alexander Calder (Minister of Immigration and Colonization)

Unionist

Mr. CALDEE:

That has always been

the case.

Topic:   IMMIGRATION ACT AMENDMENT.
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L LIB
UNION

James Alexander Calder (Minister of Immigration and Colonization)

Unionist

Mr. CALDEE:

Because we have made

some changes in the law so far as certain prohibited classes are concerned, we have to embody these changes in this clause.

Topic:   IMMIGRATION ACT AMENDMENT.
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L LIB
UNION

James Alexander Calder (Minister of Immigration and Colonization)

Unionist

Mr. CALDER:

I presume provision will be made in the Criminal Code that when under any law an officer is required to do a certain thing and does not do it, he shall be subject to the general penalty there provided. When, by any provincial statute, a duty is assigned to an officer and he fails to carry out that duty, he is subject to a penalty under the general law.

Topic:   IMMIGRATION ACT AMENDMENT.
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L LIB

Andrew Ross McMaster

Laurier Liberal

Mr. McMASTER:

I would point out to the minister the great difficulty, in a large city, of the city clerk or secretary of the municipality, knowing anything about this.

Topic:   IMMIGRATION ACT AMENDMENT.
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UNION

James Alexander Calder (Minister of Immigration and Colonization)

Unionist

Mr. CALDER:

This is only if it comes to his knowledge.

Topic:   IMMIGRATION ACT AMENDMENT.
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Section agreed to. On section 15-arrest or prosecution of rejected or deported person remaining in or returning to Canada except in case of inability to comply with money qualifications :


L LIB

Andrew Ross McMaster

Laurier Liberal

Mr. McMASTER:

What regulations, in brief, have been made under the War Measures Act concerning these matters?

Topic:   IMMIGRATION ACT AMENDMENT.
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UNION

James Alexander Calder (Minister of Immigration and Colonization)

Unionist

Mr. CALDER:

Since the armistice was signed an Order in Council was put through under the War Measures Act providing' for the deportation of those interned at that time.

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L LIB

Daniel Duncan McKenzie (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Laurier Liberal

Mr. McKENZIE:

In our part of the country quite a number were interned without very much justification, simply because they belonged to a certain alien enemy country. I do not know that we had any evidence in particular against them more than that. Before any people of this class are deported there should be an opportunity given to them to testify as to their conduct, or some trial or investigation should be held. It is only fair to ourselves and them that we shall have evidence as to why they should be deported.

Topic:   IMMIGRATION ACT AMENDMENT.
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UNION

James Alexander Calder (Minister of Immigration and Colonization)

Unionist

Mr. CALDER:

I have the Order under my hand. The operative part of it reads as follows:

The minister considers it advisable that all alien enemy interned prisoners who may be regarded as dangerous, hostile or undesirable, should be repatriated with the least possible delay and he therefore recommends that it should be provided under the authority of the War Measures Act of 1914 that the Minister of Justice shall be authorized to direct the immediate expulsion, removal, or deportation from Canada, for the purpose of their repatriation, of ail such interned aliens of enemy nationality as he may consider dangerous, hostile or undesirable persons residing in Canada. And that direction by the Minister of Justice under his hand shall be sufficient authority for the purpose aforesaid.

It will be noticed that this applies only to those who were in internment camps at the signing of the armistice, not to those who had been previously interned. Under this Order in Council, I understand, some one hundred of those who were interned have already been deported, and arrangements are being made for the deportation of others just as rapidly as they can go.

I think it may be assumed that those who were kept interned, and were in internment camps at the time of the armistice, may be regarded as dangerous and undesirable. In the early part of the war, as I explained yesterday, there were a good many persons interned for other reasons than that they were hostile or dangerous. Those have long ago been liberated on parole, and this section only applies to those who will be actually deported under Order in Council,

_ not those who were interned during the early part of the war.

Topic:   IMMIGRATION ACT AMENDMENT.
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L LIB

Andrew Ross McMaster

Laurier Liberal

Mr. McMASTER:

Do I understand that it only applies to those who are dangerous-and hostile?

Topic:   IMMIGRATION ACT AMENDMENT.
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UNION
L LIB

Daniel Duncan McKenzie (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Laurier Liberal

Mr. McKENZIE:

That was really the point I endeavoured to make. The minister is a lawyer himself and knows that when we talk of appealing to a tribunal-the Minister of Justice is the tribunal in this case-that any such state of things exists, that implies there has been an investigation, and that the decision is based on a finding upon facts properly submitted. Well, that is just what I was saying-the Minister of Justice should be in possession of well authenticated facts in order to reach a conclusion; it must not be by hearsay. If the Minister of Justice, after a proper investigation, and after well authenticated facts have been submitted to him, reaches a conclusion, I have nothing more to say.

Topic:   IMMIGRATION ACT AMENDMENT.
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Section agreed to. On section 17-Cost of deportation aftei five years.


April 25, 1919