March 14, 1919

L LIB

Andrew Ross McMaster

Laurier Liberal

Mr. McMASTER:

A great number of

these gentlemen are dead, while others are supporting Union Government.

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UNION

Robert Lorne Richardson

Unionist

Mr. RICHARDSON:

That cuts no ice

with the prophet; as the late John Henry Pope would have said, "There hain t nothin' to it." I think it would be a pity to omit dear old Aleck Smith. He has stood true to the party through good and evil report, and I think he ought to have a place among those stones. After Elijah had built the altar, he dug trenches into which his servants poured four barrels of water. I would suggest to my hon. friend the prophet from Brome that instead of pouring water over these old-timers, he pour kerosine, for without that I cannot conceive of any fire from Heaven or any place else that would burn that crowd. Then, as to the burnt offering, our friend

the prophet from Brome, with his loins girded and his whiskers any old length, must be careful about the selection. Elijah selected a bullock, I would suggest that the hon. gentleman drop the last three letters of the word "bullock." Also, as to how the animal should be slaughtered, I think that in view of the machine gun practice of many of these hon. gentlemen in the constituencies for the last twenty-five years, they should shoot the animal. And after these details are attended to it will be interesting to stand by and observe which god he will invoke to get his sacrifice consumed. Will he call upon Jehovah whom he would regard as the god of free-trade, or upon Baal, the reputed god of protection? He will be obliged to gash his flesh much worse than did the prophets of Baal, and cry much louder than they, in order to be heard. And is there not a danger, if he calls on the god of free trade, that he will be reminded of the 1893 platform and the seventy-one-one-hundredths of one per cent? Then, of course, whether or not he is answered by fire he is up against the proposition of imitating the example of Elijah and taking the four hundred and fifty prophets of Baal and slaughtering them. In order to secure that number he will have to strike without discrimination. He will have to have recourse to both parties, and probably he will find that when he has slaughtered all the prophets of Baal on his own side he has hardly a sufficient number left for a quorum in caucus. Then after the slaughter, he must in imitation of the prophet retire to the wilderness and sit down under a juniper tree and ask the Lord to take away his life, as - he, only he, is left of all Israel who have not bowed the knee to Baal. But against this I think I hear the stentorian voice of the stalwart member for Red Deer declaring that not seven thousand only, but seventy times seven thousand free traders stand fast to free trade in this country, and I think I hear him suggesting also to my hon. friend from Brome to have recourse to the only acceptable sacrifice, a broken and a contrite heart.

I r?ant to say a few words in regard to the tariff. It is bound to loom up at the present session. When the Union Government was organized there seemed to be an understanding that the tariff would not he discussed at least for a short time. At the present session it is not unlikely that the tariff will be discussed. It is a live issue. In order that this country and its industries may succeed, it is desirable that

there should be stability in regard to the tariff. I represent a rural constituency in the West. Let me say to this House that the West is in desperate earnest in regard to the tariff. In the old days when the National Policy was formulated there was practically no West and no population in that country. There is now a large population .in Western Canada and the people there feel that they have carried the burden as long as they feel they can afford to carry it. They feel that they must have relief and that they must be placed in as good a position as the farmers of the Western States in order that the country may succeed.

Let me say to you, Sir, and to the members of the Government, that there are no politics in the West. The West is not playing politics. I find that my. old Tory friends in the West, now that partisanship has been set aside, are heartily in favour of low tariff. In the old days, because of party feeling, they co-operated with their party, but now that there is no longer party Government, but Union /Government, they say: We are with you; take the tariff off. The West is united. I was delighted to hear the hon. member for Kamouraska (Mr. Lapointe), for whom I have very great respect, tell this House the other evening that the province of Quebec is low tariff, or is willing to join in any effort to reduce the tariff. He spoke of Toronto as being the home of protection. I was wondering if Montreal is not almost as bad in that respect. I do not know what the feeling in Quebec is. I take it for granted that the hon. gentleman would not misinform the House-I am quite sure he would not knowingly do so-and that when he stated, as he did the other night, that there is a large section of the people in Quebec in favour of low tariff he believed it to be the fact.

In the three western provinces there is absolute unanimity in regard to lowering the tariff. Let me say in all seriousness to my hon. friend the Acting Prime Minister that I hop'e he will give earnest consideration to this question. I appeal to him-he is an old Liberal. The right hon. the Prime Minister (Sir Robert Borden) is an old Liberal; they at least have no prejudice against low tariff. They, and the Government, are'in a position to solve this very important problem, or to help to solve it, perhaps at the present time or in the near future. Let me tell the Acting Prime Minister, the Government, and this House that the people of the West are not playing politics. They care absolutely nothing about politics. They are heart sick of par-fWr. Richardson.]

tisanship but they are resolved on one thing and that is that the tariff must come down. Members who represent the West in this House, mostly behind the Union Government, I think I can fairly say, are reasonable men. They are not going to put a pistol at the head of the Government or at the head of the leader of the Government and say: "Stand and Deliver." If I interpret the feelings of my colleagues from the West accurately, and I think I do, individually and collectively, rather than do that they would prefer to efface themselves and retire from Parliament. We from the West are so obsessed with the problems that face this Union Government, with the colossal task that is before them in connection with reconstruction, that we would go a long way not to embarrass the Government, but on the contrary we would desire to assist the Government. But, the members from the West have not the say. I tell the Acting Prime Minister that I think he can deal on favourable and just grounds with the representatives from the West. But if the Government does not deal with the representatives from the West, who are reasonable, and who realize the gravity of the problem, then the Government must deal with the people of the West and the people of the West are agreed as one man and they are in no very friendly mood at the present time. They think that they have been made a football of between the parties for all these years and, if the resolutions they have passed and their deliberations indicate what their mind is, they purpose having justice.

In the name of Union, in the name of the unity of the country, I appeal to my hon. friend the acting leader of the Government and to the members of the Government, to weigh this matter seriously, to weigh it gravely in order to avert trouble and what may prove a division in the country, and to bring about a reconciliation as between the various elements in the country.

I said this afternoon, and I want to reiterate it here that the time has come when the people of this country, the different races and elements, must forget their differences. The war is over. I do not suppose it will ever be necessary again to resort to conscription. Perhaps happily there may be no great questions which will in the future divide the peoples of the country. I have every respect for the great province of Quebec. I know something of the French Canadian people, something of their kindness of heart, their chivalry, their magnanimity, and I believe now that the

clouds are disappearing an effort ought to be made to unite all the people. The great province of Quebec ought to be represented and speedily in the Government of this country. I hope the time is not far distant when our good friends from Quebec will see the reasonableness of the situation and realize the logic of events. Let them yield a point and let the people on this side yield a point in order that harmony and real union may prevail, and so that wa may be able in this country to build up a great people.

We have wonderful, magnificent resources. All we have to do is to tickle the soil and tap those resources in order to make this country what it should be, the home of a united and happy people. Let the clouds roll by, let us have union, and if the Government is able to meet the wishes of the West, or reasonably so, on this tariff question, it will go a long way towards cementing East and West.

In conclusion I wish to say that it is my desire, as I believe it is the desire of the people of Canada, to see a great party built up in this country that will serve the public. The people are sick of the partisan cries and the partisan shibboleths. Let us go in for Service from now on. Surely a party like this, which was founded for the purpose of carrying on a great work, founded on a great principle, and sanctified, as one hon. member said the other day, by the blood of sixty thousand of the noblest sons of the Dominion, must and should develop into an agency which will be able to guard and protect the best interests of Canada.

Mr. F. J. 'PELLETIER (Matane) (translation) : Mr. Speaker, when we were apprised of the fact that the most complete and most glorious victory had brought to the Allies the assurance of a peace founded on justice and right, our hearts were filled with deep joy and we said to ourselves that the session which was about to open would rank among the brightest and the most fruitful. Unfortunately, as hon. members have already remarked, in spite of universal jubilation, it was amidst most profound mourning and most sincere grief that this House did open, this year, just after the disappearance of one of the most brilliant men who ever were within these precincts. The voice of 'Sir Wilfrid Laurier, a voice so eloquent, has been silenced forever, and it seems as though the walls of this House were yet resounding with its accents, so

closely was the life of that man identified with the life of the country.

However, notwithstanding the fact that our chief is no more and that, as a consequence of his sudden demise, our organization has been perturbed, it is by no means our intention to lose our interest in the affairs of the country; on the contrary, we shall follow the example of that illustrious man, trying to make up, to the full extent of our limited possibilities, for the great worth which he represented and to which the whole country did such a telling hom-mage on the occasion of his demise;, we shall try, in every possible way, to help the work of reconstruction which now lies at our door after the four years of warfare just elapsed, and we shall do so by our most earnest co-operation and our most practical suggestions, so that the Government may fulfil, if they wish so to do, the arduous task incumbent upon them, under the circumstances.

The measures outlined in the Speech from the Throne, this year, are numerous, but if they are to be realized to any advantage, they must be considered in their true light and be rightly interpreted, whatever the preferences of the majority and the settled views of certain elements.

Be the good will of the Governement as it may, Mr. Speaker, all their efforts will be useless if they remain blind to the real conditions under which the country is now labouring and if they fancy that they can mould public opinion as they like, independently of the mighty currents apparent in every country since the evolutions, not to say the revolutions, which have taken place almost everywhere.

Conditions in the old countries of Europe are now being completely upset. A new power has asserted itself, and that power which has overturned everything in certain countries will soon make its influence felt in Canada. It (would be an irretrievable mistake to believe that it may be possible to stop this rising tide, to dam this rushing stream. What we want is to guide this new power, to subdue it, to make it instrumental in doing great work for the reconstruction of the country and in view of the transition from war conditions to peace conditions.

This new power is that of the immense army of workmen and of the select battalion of farmers. Those two classes, upon which the prosperity and the future of every country are presumed to rest, realize the importance of the part they are now playing, and they have resolved on asserting their rights and enforcing respect of such rights.

In certain countries, Mr. Speaker, efforts were made to crush this new-born power, with the result that the masses revolted and that all barriers were overthrown. All kinds of unsound doctrines were instilled in the minds of the people by unscrupulous agitators, with the result that the advent of the working class was that of anarchy and disorganization.

It is not to be feared that the new countries of America, should we remain in different, may suffer in the same way? Is it not to be feared, that, through our carelessness, the labouring classes, whether they belong to industry or to agriculture, may become the prey of dangerous agitators? It is with a view to avoiding such misfortune, that I would like the Government of this country to become particularly interested in the condition of the working classes. Owing to certain influences well known to us all and which the Government did not try to do away with, the cost of staple goods in Canada has increased beyond proportion. True it is that the salaries of the workingmen have increased also, but this increase is far from representing a due compensation for the voluntary or arbitrary increase in the cost of living. Previous to the war, $7 was enough to keep a family during a week. In January, 1919, the same family of five was obliged to spend, for the same length of time, the sum of $14.87, which meant an increase of one hundred percent. Surely, people working on munitions earned very high salaries, but the manufacturing of munitions has stopped and there is, so far, no indication of a decrease in the cost of life in the near future. The situation is yet a serious one, nay, is getting to be more and more disquieting, for a great many people are looking for work, and in some cases, there is a tendency to a decrease in salaries. Therefore, the Government must look into that problem with no delay and not so much with a view to securing higher salaries for the workingmen as to making sure that a decrease in the cost of life will be brought about. The buying power of a dollar, to-day, is reduced to such an extent, that nobody will even think of saving under circumstances where this could be done heretofore. It is absolutely, necessary that conditions should change before it is too late.

The hon. gentlemen who moved the Address said: "To-day, the cloud has lifted and we stand on the threshold of an assured and, I believe, a lasting era of peace. Our great epoch of struggle and sacrifice is ended." Those words are true in so far

fMr. Pelletier.]

as they concern external peace, but one has not the same certainty of internal peace when one hears the ominous rumblings, here and in other countries of the world.

My hon. friend says further: "The people of Canada may, now that the tremendous burden of effort and sacrifice, imposed on them by the war, has been removed, pause to review with pride the excellent record which they have made under the leadership of the Prime Minister and his cabinet."

Beyond doubt the people of Canada may look with pride to the great things that have been accomplished. I am sure they have already done so, but they will not pause for all that. Those who have amassed millions of dollars during the war, those who have doubled and tripled their already large holdings, can pause and look back on what has been done, but the workingman, the father of a large family who has to wait for the weekly or monthly pay to buy bread and shoes for his children has no time to pause.

If the Prime Minister and his cabinet are really anxious to give the people time to pause and review in their mind the glorious pages that have been added to the history of our country, the economic condition must be changed; there must be an end to those groping and tentative methods and the country should be given constructive legislation.

By all means let the Government do something to bring down the high cost of living.

Iif nothing is done in that direction, the peace that will be signed shortly in Paris will mean nothing for Canada, for war between classes will have started and no one can predict where it will stop.

What is going on in other countries does not justify us in being optimists. What is happening in the great cities; the bolshevic and socialistic disturbances that we hear of, when the censor abstains interfering with the newspapers, does not convey any great hope for the future.

How can the Government lower the cost of living? First by not allowing the unscrupulous middleman to carry on his speculations in regard to all the necessities of life.

Three years ago, the Canadian people should have been protected against those . vampires. The only means to that end is to impose a very heavy tax on all profits over a reasonable percentage. Those who are convicted of extravagance and hoarding should be severely dealt with. A maximum price should be put on every necessary

article, determined by the cost of production, and not by the fancy of those who have secured a monopoly of the goods.

We are lavishing praises on thd soldiers returning from the front and we .say that nothing is too good for them. Those praises are certainly well deserved, for our men fought heroically and havq made the sacrifice of their lives. But they will not live on praise and eulogy. They cannot be cajoled by such interested flattery.

Let us not forget that these men are returning from a part of the world where a dangerous wind is blowing and that they will not be satisfied with being directed like blind men or coddled like children. Let us remember that in Russia it is the soldiers, the working men and the farmers who have taken the reins. I do not see why the soldiers, the working men and the farmers of Canada could not play the same trick on our 'Government.

The Government have given notice of special legislation for the settlement of the returned soldiers on lands, to promote agriculture. The Government have also in mind the construction of magnificent public roads and are taking steps to attract a very large immigration into this country.

Every one of these propositions is commendable and has some good points. However, they should be approached and dealt with in a practical way. The surest way to improve the economic conditions in this country is to develop and encourage agriculture by a wise policy of colonization.

However, the idea of reserving the crown lands for the soldiers, and excluding all other settlers by rules and regulations as ridiculous as they are tyrannical is a double mistake.

Experience has taught us that the settling of soldiers on agricultural lands is an unproductive and hurtful experiment. In many cases, the returned soldiers, lacking training and experience, will take up lands as compensation for the sacrifices they have made, but the lands will not be put under cultivation, or at least the production will be far below what it would be under good management.

The duty of the hour is to put under cultivation, by all conceivable means, the largest area possible; it is to call on every one to take a hand in promoting colonization.

Let a keen spirit of rivalry be stimulated throughout the country; let inducements and appeals be multiplied so as to guide as many recruits as possibe towards the new

lands. Thus only can it be hoped that the surplus population of country places will be diverted to the new regions, instead of increasing the army of unemployed in the cities, and that the labourers who deserted the farms will be encouraged to resume that eminently beneficent calling.

Let the soldiers be treated with a great deal of kindness, well and good; but be it remembered that the remainder of the nation that toile.d and suffered, that laboured and paid during the whole war, also deserved well of the country. Moreover, the national interest requires it and it is needed to ensure peace in the future.

Let large sums be spent in order to lay out roads, well and good; but the construction of highways for the motor cars of those who have reaped millions of dollars during the war must not alone be thought of. Let an attempt be made in order to give an easy access to the lands intended for settlement; finally, let new roads that will induce settlers to take up the new lands be opened.

On the other hand, let us not rely too much upon immigration during the years to follow the signing of the peace treaty. Every country on earth will need its manual labour and shall have an excess population to feed. The only proof of it is that England is pleased to send to Canada thousands of women who are no more of any use to her and whom they cause the Canadian soldiers to marry. Already 50,000 of those women have entered our country and others will come to Canada.

As for men, we cannot depend upon their coming soon. There are too many gaps to fill in Europe to be in a hurry to let go healthy men fit for production. If we need men, let us keep those we have already and put a stop to that stupid agitation whose result would be to turn out of the country people who have been lured by inducements of all kinds and whose only fault is to have been born in one country rather than in another.

Instead of turning them out, let us teach them to love Canada and to look upon it as the finest, the most hospitable, the freest and most generous country on earth. He who loves a country is loyal to it, and people who have been here since many years, even if they were born in countries which have become hostile, would not be long impervious to that beneficent influence.

Let us begin by expunging from our statute books the War-time Elections Act, that legislative blunder whose only use was to foster distrust and dissatisfaction among

thousands of people who had been granted British citizenship and never did anything to deserve such a downfall.

After all, Mr. Speaker, if it is our wish that Canada pass succesfully through that transitional period between war and peace, if it is our rwish that all the good purposes of the Government, all their good measures be efficiently carried out, let us try to put into practice those noble utterances of the hon. member from Thunder Bay and Rainy River (Mr. Manion) delivered in this House the other day: "I am deeply convinced that the establishment of a real entente cordiale in this country should be the desire of all true lovers of Canada. The man, Sir, whether he be a French-speaking Canadian or an English-speaking Canadian, whether he be a Catholic or a Protestant, who wilfully fosters antagonism of race and creed in this country is neither a true friend nor a loyal citizen of the land we love."

Those are words that should ring into the ears of all those who had a hand in a criminal and condemned policy, in a policy that is very aptly described in a pamphlet which the Government had brought in for their electoral campaign, and which is entitled: "Language oppression in the

German Empire;" but influential members of the ministry prevented its distribution because it expounded a principle which was a menace to some provincial governments.

Those are words which I take as my own for they express the most intimate conviction of every hon. member of the House, and the Government may rely upon our entire co-operation in all measures they take to establish such an entente cordiale. Besides, that is the foundation of the prosperity and power of our magnificent country, and it should be the first thought of all rulers.

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L LIB

François Jean Pelletier

Laurier Liberal

Mr. PELLETIER (Continuing in English) :

If I may be allowed, Mr. Speaker, to say a few words in English, there are a few points that I wish to take up.

The member for Springfield (Mr. Richardson) says that he does not believe in following leaders or parties. I wonder what happened to him at the last session of Parliament when he offered a motion by way of amendment to the resolution proposed with regard to titles, suggesting that no titles of any class or kind should be granted to domiciled Canadians-and then refused to vote for it. The hon. member subsequently stated:

When I proposed this amendment I had no conception that it was a question which in any way might precipitate a crisis in the country.

I had no conception that the Prime Minister of this country would stake the existence of the Government on this issue. I was elected as a supporter of the Union Government, and X would much prefer to resign my seat here tonight than to jeopardize the existence of the Government. In my parliamentary experience-in the old days I understood that when a private member introduced a motion, members of the House on both sides were perfectly free to vote for or against it, according to how it appealed to them.

Mr. Speaker, when a member makes a motion or offers an amendment and has not the courage to vote for his own motion, what can we expect?

The hon. gentleman stated that he did not believe in following leaders or parties. He said further that he thought he was too good to be in this world after a conversation he had had with a political leader of his. If he is too good to live in this world, he is very unfortunate. According to his own statement thjs evening, the Liberal party has withdrawn communion from him. It would appear that the few remarks made by the Prime Minister prior to the taking of the vote on the question of titles resulted in the courage of his convictions being taken away from the meipber for Springfield.

The member for Frontenac (Mr. Edwards) said on Thursday evening last in the course of his remarks that defaulters under the Military Service Act should not be sent to prison, or words to that effect. Let me say, Mr. Speaker, that in many cases the fact that boys did not report for duty was due to their receiving their notices after the day they were summoned to report. In other cases, sons of farmers were under the impression that they were exempt from military service for a certain time and continued their labour on the farm, thus helping the country by producing and helping to feed our soldiers and those at home. And I, Mr. Speaker, like the member for Frontenac, do not believe in imposing heavy fines on such men. In many cases the fine cannot be paid, and the defaulter must take the jail path, which is not a royal one by any means. I believe this policy to be a grave mistake, because these defaulters have shown no criminal instinct, and by sending them to jail you may make criminals of them, even though they be honest men, and blot their careers forever. I demand an amnesty for the young man who was on the farm and was a good soldier in producing and helping to feed the Allies, but who did not understand the law that even lawyers did not understand. If you punish any one, punish the profiteers, whose only ambition was to accumulate wealth and who did not care a continental how long

the war lasted or how much blood was shed so long as they filled their coffers at the cost of the poorer classes, who will have to pay a tax for years to come.

The member for Frontenac also said that the personalities of Macdonald and Laurier suppressed individuality, and that from now on the men who sit in this House will express their individual opinions. The hon. gentleman said that that would be a good thing for the Dominion. Mr. Speaker, such may have been the case in the Tory ranks, but with us it is quite different. The proof is that those who left the ranks of Liberalism to join the Unionists were left free by Sir Wilfrid Laurier to act as their conscience dictated, and they have done as they pleased.

Nearly all my hon. friends on the other side of the House spoke about the dim light in the window. The member for Frontenac claims that so far as the Liberal party is concerned, this light is flickering away. Mr. Speaker, if our light is flickering away, may I ask what has become of the Tory light which has disappeared entirely, never to show up again? No doubt it died out or was submerged in the three elements that the member for Dorchester spoke of last Thursday evening. But our light will come up brighter than ever, because true patriotism and the real interest of our country can be found only in Liberalism.

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UNION

Thomas Foster

Unionist

Mr. THOMAS FOSTER (East York):

Mr. Speaker, I wish to congratulate the hon. member for East Calgary (Mr. Redman) who moved the Address in reply to the speech from the Throne. I wish to congratulate the hon. member for Fort William and Rainy River (Mr. Manion) who seconded the Address. I am sure we appreciate the .efforts of those young men, who, responding so nobly to the call of the Empire, went forward to the front and did their part and returned to this country with great honour. The people of this country showed their appreciation of the splendid work of those young men by electing them to this House of Commons, thus giving them an opportunity of showing that they were equal to the occasion as representatives of the people of this Dominion in this House, as young Canadians who would assist in making the laws and in inaugurating great reforms in this country. Therefore, when the people of this country show their appreciation in that way, we must acknowledge that they deserve the showing of that appreciation.

We should feel that a compliment was paid to Canada by the calling of Sir Robert

Borden to England for the purpose of assisting in the settlement of the terms of peace at the conclusion of the greatest war in the history of the world. We are proud to have such an eminent statesman assisting in that settlement.

I wish to congratulate the Acting Prime Minister (Sir Thomas White) on his splendid leadership of this House during the absence of the Prime Minister (Sir Robert Borden). We know that the Acting Prime Minister has exceptional ability. He has shown that he possesses it, and we feel that it is the duty of hon. members to render whatever assistance they can to him in order to encourage him in the success which he has made of that leadership.

There are many matters of great importance to be brought before the House during this session. We know that last year the Government had a great deal of responsibility. We know that their physical powers were put to the test by the many duties they had to perform. We know that many Orders in Council were passed and that many commissions were appointed to carry on the great work of this country. We also know that when the members were called to this House at the last session, they felt that there was very little for them to do; that at this period under war conditions it was perhaps necessary that many Orders in Council should be passed and that many commissions should be appointed. Some hon, members, however, thought that as Parliament was in session, some of the responsibility should be placed upon the representatives of the people and some of the work performed by them, and that fewer Orders in Council should be passed and fewer commissions appointed. Now that the war is over, and now that the members

M. DEMERS: Mr. Speaker, I draw your attention to the fact that we have not .a quorum.

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L LIB

Georges Henri Boivin (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Laurier Liberal

Mr. DEPUTY SPEAKER:

The hon. member has drawn my attention to the fact that there is not a quorum present.

And a count having been taken, it was found that a quorum was not in the Chamber.

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L LIB

Georges Henri Boivin (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Laurier Liberal

Mr. DEPUTY SPEAKER:

There is not a quorum present. This House stands adjourned until to-morrow afternoon at two o'clock. [DOT]

Accordingly, the House adjourned at 10.10 p.m.

Wednesday, March 12, 1919,

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The House met at Two o'clock.


GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH.

SPECIAL ORDER LAPSED-MOTION FOR ITS REINSTATEMENT.

UNION

William Thomas White (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Unionist

Sir THOMAS WHITE (Acting Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, owing to the want of a quorum in the House last evening the debate on the special Order of the Day which was then under discussion has lapsed, and it becomes necessary to restore it to the Order Paper by motion. Therefore, I beg to move, seconded by Mr. Carvell:

That the special Order of the Day for resuming the adjourned debate on the motion of Mr. Redman for an Address to His Excellency the Governor General, in reply to his speech at the opening of the session, having lapsed by reason of the House having been declared adjourned for want of a quorum on the 11th instant, when the said order was under consideration, be revived and placed on the Order Paper for consideration this day.

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L LIB

Daniel Duncan McKenzie (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Laurier Liberal

Mr. D. D. McKENZIE (Cape Breton North):

Mr. Speaker, under the ruling of your honour of 3rd of July

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UNION

Edgar Nelson Rhodes (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Unionist

Air. SPEAKER:

I presume the hon. member rises to discuss the point of order.

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L LIB

Daniel Duncan McKenzie (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Laurier Liberal

Mr. McKENZIE:

Yes.

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UNION

Edgar Nelson Rhodes (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Unionist

Mr. SPEAKER:

The motion itself is not debatable. __

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L LIB

Daniel Duncan McKenzie (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Laurier Liberal

Mr. McKENZIE:

I know that your honour has ruled that this motion is not debatable, but I presume the acting leader of the Government is moving under Order No. 41,- that is, that a motion without notice can be introduced by the unanimous leave of the House As I understand that, Mr. Speaker, it means that the Acting Prime Minister, or any person moving as he is moving, must move for leave to make a motion by unanimous consent of the House. If Order No. 41 does not mean that, I do not understand that it has any meaning at all. If an hon. member makes a motion that requires unanimity of the House, he must first obtain the consent of the House.

I further wish to say that the Order of the Day fixed by rule 25 of the Rules and Proceedings governing this House has set for to-day a certain procedure; and before the hon. Acting Prime Minister can move his motion he should move the suspension of Rule No. 25, so as to give him the right of. way to make this motion. Unless some provision is made for it, we must go through the whole procedure before we reach the Order of the Day with respect to which this motion comes into effect. These are my

[The Deputy Speaker.]

obj'ections. I am not taking obj'ection to the main motion, but merely to the way in which it is moved. I will not discuss the motion, but I am sorry that as one of the fruits of continuous Orders in Council, hon. gentlemen supporting the Government do not think it necessary to be in the House.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH.
Subtopic:   SPECIAL ORDER LAPSED-MOTION FOR ITS REINSTATEMENT.
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UNION

Edgar Nelson Rhodes (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Unionist

Mr. SPEAKER:

Whatever weight may

be attached to the point raised by the hon. leader of the Opposition (Mr. McKenzie), that point is one which was settled when a decision was given under similar circumstances two years ago. It so happened that the present incumbent of the Chair rendered that decision; nevertheless it is binding until the House sees fit to alter his judgment on the matter. It only remains for me to follow that decision, which was that it was competent for the motion to be submitted and, if agreed to, that a debate which has lapsed by reason of lack of a quorum may be restored in all respects to the position which it occupied prior to its lapse.

Upon the second point raised by the leader of the Opposition, I would refer him to the fact that at the opening of the session on the 20th day of February, there was passed a motion by which it was ordered that the speech of His Excellency the Governor General should be taken into consideration the following Tuesday; this Order to have precedence over all other business except the introduction of Bills. If the motion which is now submitted by the acting leader of the Government carries, my judgment is that it places the debate in precisely the same position as if it had not lapsed. That the motion is quite in order, and if it be adopted by the House we shall proceed with the adjourned debate as the first Order of the Day.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH.
Subtopic:   SPECIAL ORDER LAPSED-MOTION FOR ITS REINSTATEMENT.
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Motion agreed to.


REPORTS AND PAPERS.


The Civil Service List.-Hon. Mr. Burrell.


GOVERNMENT PRINTING BUREAU.

March 14, 1919