May 23, 1918

UNION

Samuel Hughes

Unionist

Sir SAM HUGHES:

The British authorities were paying forty-two cents per pound at the time we made the arrangement by which the industry of smelting zinc and copper in Canada was established. I did not know that the price of zinc in the United States had fallen to twelve cents. How about the ores imported from the United States? The only objection I have to this measure is that it does not protect our own ore producers sufficiently, but treats the Yankee producers of ore the same as it does the Canadian producer.

Topic:   THE ZINC BOUNTIES ACT, 1916.
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UNION

Martin Burrell (Minister of Mines; Secretary of State of Canada)

Unionist

Mr. BURRELL:

I do not think there are any zinc ores imported from the United States.

Topic:   THE ZINC BOUNTIES ACT, 1916.
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UNION
UNION

Martin Burrell (Minister of Mines; Secretary of State of Canada)

Unionist

Mr. BURRELL:

Lead ores, but not zinc ores.

Topic:   THE ZINC BOUNTIES ACT, 1916.
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UNION
UNION

Martin Burrell (Minister of Mines; Secretary of State of Canada)

Unionist

Mr. BURRELL:

No, in the class of ore they have been importing, the zinc would be an extraneous element, so that they do not want it. They do not import ores that have zinc in them. There is one thing that seems to appeal to one pretty strongly, and the ex-Minister of Militia (Sir Sam Hughes) touched on it. It was the paramount necessity for this zinc for munitions of war that really induced these people to go into the zinc business at all. Certainly, after an expenditure of $2,500,000, they have accomplished wonders, and they would not have required one cent of help if the British Government had been able to live up to their promise that they would take every pound of zinc that could be manufactured, but they have not taken it simply because of the Russian situation, and as they had a credit established in the United States, they took an immense quantity of zinc from there, and consequently had to turn around and say: We cannot take any more.

Topic:   THE ZINC BOUNTIES ACT, 1916.
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UNION

Samuel Hughes

Unionist

Sir SAM HUGHES:

Is the reason that our zinc is not being taken by the British Government to-day because the Chairman of the Munitions Board did not advance Victory Loan money for it? That money seems to toe for beef and bacon and things of that kind.

Topic:   THE ZINC BOUNTIES ACT, 1916.
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UNION

Martin Burrell (Minister of Mines; Secretary of State of Canada)

Unionist

Mr. BURRELL:

I have never heard that statement.

Topic:   THE ZINC BOUNTIES ACT, 1916.
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UNION
UNION

Alexander Kenneth Maclean (Minister Without Portfolio)

Unionist

Mr. A. K. MACLEAN:

It is limited to two years and a total of $400,000. Nothing has yet been paid.

Topic:   THE ZINC BOUNTIES ACT, 1916.
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L LIB

William Daum Euler

Laurier Liberal

Mr. EULER:

If it is impossible for this company at the present time to produce the zinc so as to be able to sell it at a price which would give them a return, why should they not follow the practice followed by other concerns under similar circumstances and discontinue business? If the British Government are not in the market for their product, why not discontinue the production of this particular commodity until such time as there is a market for it the same as others have to do?

Topic:   THE ZINC BOUNTIES ACT, 1916.
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UNION

Alexander Kenneth Maclean (Minister Without Portfolio)

Unionist

Mr. A. K. MACLEAN:

There will never be a market for it unless they can reduce their production-cost down to the cost of producing ordinary zinc. They embarked in the enterprise practically >at the request of the British Government and the 'Canadian Government, in order that the allied countries might have a supply of zinc. Circumstances have so developed that these countries will not buy, and there is no market for the product. They must sell a high-grade article at the price of a lower-grade article.

Topic:   THE ZINC BOUNTIES ACT, 1916.
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UNION

Samuel Hughes

Unionist

Sir SAM HUGHES:

What information has the minister as to the reason why the British Government will not 'buy this zinc? I never heard of it before. I know that they were paying 42 cents a pound and that we saved the British Government millions and millions of dollars by producing it at 15 cents a pound. It is very strange that the British Government, which has been paying 42 cents a pound for zinc, will not buy zinc from us unless they get it for 15 cents a pound. There is something about this that requires looking into. I have heard it said that the reason the Imperial Munitions Board will not buy this zinc is very much the same as the reason why the British Government would not buy fish. The fish had to come from Newfoundland, and $7,000,000 or $8,000,000 was lost to Canada while Newfoundland got the sale of the fish. Probably the zinc will go through the hands of some Yankee concern and they will get the profit. We might as well look into these things.

On section 5-regulations:

Topic:   THE ZINC BOUNTIES ACT, 1916.
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L LIB

Joseph Read

Laurier Liberal

Mr. JOSEPH READ:

It is apparent to all that when the Government gave notice of this Bill they also gave notice of a Bill to authorize the payment of a bounty on lead. I noticed that in the original lead bounty Bill, clause 5 read in this way:

The Governor in Council may make such rules and regulations, including regulations as to rates and charges for refining, as are deemed expedient in the public interest for carrying out the purpose of this Act and all payments of bounty shall be subject to the due observance of such rules and regulations.

It looks to me as if they had switched from the lead to the zinc in order to avoid that clause. I made a reference to this subject in the Budget debate, and toy leave of the House I will recall the fact that on that occasion I read a letter which had been written by a resident of British Columbia. When I read that letter one hon. gentleman said that the man who wrote it was a miner. He is not a miner; he is a medical doctor, and he has taken care of the families of soldiers free of charge ever since the war broke out. He is an altruist and not an egoist. He says-

Topic:   THE ZINC BOUNTIES ACT, 1916.
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L LIB

Georges Henri Boivin (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Laurier Liberal

The CHAIRMAN:

Order. I cannot allow the hon. gentleman to read from, a previous debate on another subject in the same session.

Topic:   THE ZINC BOUNTIES ACT, 1916.
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L LIB
L LIB

Georges Henri Boivin (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Laurier Liberal

The CHAIRMAN:

It is absolutely against the Tules of the House.

Topic:   THE ZINC BOUNTIES ACT, 1916.
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L LIB
L LIB

Georges Henri Boivin (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Laurier Liberal

The CHAIRMAN:

But it is an altogether different debate.

Topic:   THE ZINC BOUNTIES ACT, 1916.
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L LIB

Joseph Read

Laurier Liberal

Mr. J. READ:

It is a letter that I read on a previous occasion, tout on the same subject.

Topic:   THE ZINC BOUNTIES ACT, 1916.
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May 23, 1918