April 22, 1918

ALIEN LABOUR IN CANADA.

MOTIONS ON ORDER PAPER BY MR.

UNION

Edgar Nelson Rhodes (Speaker of the House of Commons)

Unionist

Mr. SPEAKER:

The first resolution on the Order Paper is one by the hon. member for Comox-Albemi (Mr. Clements) dealing with alien labour in Canada. Before putting the motion, I may say that to prevent unnecessary overlapping, it has been deemed advisable to join the discussion on resolutions Nos. 4 (Mr. Clements); 18, Mr. W. F. Miaclean (South YoTk), and 20, Mr. Nicholson (East Algoma). While they are not exactly similar, there is sufficient similarity between them to enable discussion to take place on the one resolution, which I believe meets with the approval of the movers of the respective motions.

Topic:   ALIEN LABOUR IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   MOTIONS ON ORDER PAPER BY MR.
Sub-subtopic:   ODEMENTS, MR. W. F. MACLEAN, AND MR. G. B. NICHOLSON DISCUSSED JOINTLY.
Permalink
UNION

Herbert Sylvester Clements

Unionist

Mr. H. S. CLEMENTS (Comox and AI-berni) moved:

That, in the opinion of this House, all the regulations and Orders in Council respecting Alien labour in Canada should be consolidated into one uniform law but that in framing such legislation due regard should be had to the local conditions and needs of the different parts of the Dominion.

He said: (Mr. Speaker, in rising to propose the resolution which stands in my name, I think I need offer no apology for taking up the time of the House unnecessarily. I am not a new member and I should regret at

any time bringing to the attention of the House a question which I did not deem to be of paramount interest to the country at large. Unfortunately, a good many members do take up time unnecessarily in the discussion of subjects which do not fall within that category. The question which I am going to bring forward, as the resolution itself indicates, deals with the alien situation in. Canada. I think that question is a most important one and that it merits every consideration possible from the Government, especially from a strong Union Government, who should deal with the situation with an iron hand.

Shortly after the elections in December last I drew the attention of the minister representing the province of British Columbia, and of my fellow-members from that province to the alien situation as regards western Canada, and more especially the province of British Columbia, which I have the honour to represent, a very large territory, and in each and every ease I received in reply a'very sympathetic letter practically agreeing to the programme which I proposed. Now, Mr. Speaker, as far as I am personally concerned, I desire something more than personal sympathy, I want action taken as regards the alien situation in this country, and especially in western Canada. I might say at the outset that the Order in Council brought down a few days ago by the Prime Minister, dealing with idleness in the Dominion, to some extent meets the object of my resolution, hut I must frankly state that that Order in Council will not be worth the paper it is written on unless it is carried out with a strong iron hand, not by any commission, but by the best police authority that can: possibly be obtained. To my mind to entrust its enforcement to a commission' would not meet the situation at all; there have been too many useless commissions appointed in the past. I believe that one good business man, in a good many cases, would have given better service and accomplished far more than some of these commissions have done. The main purpose of my resolution, and the advice I wish to offer to the, Government and to the country, is, that whether you take a census of the man-power of Canada or not, and I believe that is very essential, it is imperative that an absolute census should be taken of every alien in Canada, regardless of their sex and regardless of their nationality or their holdings in Canada. If that were done it would show, in

my opinion, that there are in this country very disturbing elements, a fact which this Government does not adequately realize, but which calls for strong and prompt 'action on the part of the present Union Government. If such action were taken by the Government it would show that they mean business, and it would inspire the .alien element to which I refer with greater respect for Canadian citizenship, greater respect for the institutions of the country, and a greater appreciation of the magnificent means of livelihood which they can command at any time in the Dominion. In the second place, it would be of the very greatest advantage to the present Government, or to subsequent incoming administration in this respect: They would be in a position to know what kind of immigration should be admitted into this country in the future; for I am bound to say that in the past the Federal Government has been by far too lax with respect to this subject. Greater precautions, in my humble judgment, should be adopted in the Dominion with respect to the admission of immigrants, and if a census is taken .such as I am now proposing it will be very advantageous not only at the present time, but in the future, as regards immigration. I must say that I appreciate the difficulties, not only of an international nature but otherwise, of conscripting the many thousands of aliens who are within the borders of Canada to-day. I listened with a great deal of attention to the Prime Minister's remarks last week when he referred to the thousands of Belgians who have been conscripted by Germany in the interest of that country and the maintenance of her industries. Personally, I see no reason why every alien enemy in the Dominion should not be conscripted and placed at work doing something for the State, instead of being allowed to run at large as disloyal aliens and pro-Germans are now doing to the disadvantage of Canada. I would not go so far as to say that any aliens should be conscripted and placed in the firing line, or conscripted at $1.10 a day for labour purposes. I think that due regard should 'be had at all times to labour conditions and to the views of the labour organizations of this country. I believe in the organization of labour just as much as I believe in the organization of capital, but I also hold that both of them should he reasonable in their demands. 1 believe the enemy aliens in Canada should be conscripted and put to work and given a fair wage for the sustenance of themselves

and families, .and that the 'balance of their wages, due regard being paid to the -value of their labour, should be taken and applied *for the benefit of the State, or for some fund to be devoted towards ameliorating the conditions of our gallant soldiers who have returned incapacitated from the front. That is my view so far as alien labour is concerned.

I have heard many people make the argument, including several sound business men, in connection with what may be termed the shortage of labour in this country, that the importation of fifty thousand or one hundred thousand coolie labourers from China should be permitted. I am absolutely opposed to any such idea, and I see no reason -for it. So far as the development of our national industries, or the acceleration of the production of food stuffs is concerned, if the present strong Union Government take hold of the situation, as I think they ought to do, and properly distribute the available labour, whether it be male or female, and put the new Military Act into proper effect, I believe that ample labour will be found to take care of our industries and to meet all our requirements in the way of increased food production.

There is a very large element in this Dominion who, up to the present time, have apparently not realized the seriousness of this war or the obligations of their citizenship. I refer now, not to aliens, but to our own red-blood'ed citizens, to those who are loyal Britishers, but who do not appear to realize the gravity of the situation. Possibly bom with silver spoons in their mouths and possessing bank accounts, they have shown little, if any, appreciation of the duty whlich devolves upon them of doing something in the interest of the country and! of the allied cause. Because they have a bank account, or are otherwise favoured by fortune, that is no reason why they should go. Scot free. I believe that every man from the age of twenty to sixty, including the class that I refer to, if he is not already in service should be conscripted' and made, if necessary, to don a pair of overalls and cotton shirt and drive a binder or a plough on the prairies in order to bring about greater production. That is what I would recommend in so far as that particular class is concerned.

With reference to the conscription of labour, there is no doubt that in British Columbia the lumber and other interests have made very serious complaints about the labour situation. There would be no

serious shortage of lumber in British Columbia but for the activities of alien enemy, pro-German, agitators who are creating disturbances in the different camps and at the different mills. Their propaganda is assisted by the fact that the mill owners have been endeavouring to keep the country a white man's country and not to employ Asiatio labour. A mill owner will get a crew together and at great expense will transport that crew from. Vancouver or Prince Albert to a mill 100 or 300 miles distant. Shortly after the men have reached their destination one of these enemy alien agitators will appear on the scene and' make demands upon the employer that cannot be granted. The result is that the mill is closed down. If time permitted I could give the House absolute evidence of instances in whlich agitators have appeared and, when questioned about their nationality, claimed to be Russians or Italians, when as a matter of fact they were Austrians. This element, and there are only a few hundreds of thousands of them in this country, ought to receive the attention of this Government. They ought 4 p.m. to be compelled to assume the duties of citizens of this country whose protection and liberty they enjoy. I want to be absolutely fair in my remarks in regard to these people. I am speaking with particular reference to the situation in Northern British Columbia, because I know the conditions there better than I know them as they exist in the prairie provinces, but I assume that the situation I am discussing is somewhat similar all over the Dominion. There are thousands of Austrians in Northern British Columbia who are working in the large plants there, who realize their position as aliens and who are absolutely peaceful and harmless. They are not doing any harm, but they are doing their best to develop our natural resources and to promote the Allied cause. Therefore, I have nothing to say against that peaceful element in this country. But, if this Government are not strong enough to deal with the element to which I have particularly referred, who are agitators, German sympathizers, and, in fact, just as much proGerman as the Kaiser is, then it is not worthy of the support that it got from the people of this country. I care not whether the reason advanced for not dealing with these people be international law or not; I say that the time has arrived, in the great stress of this war, when international law might very well be forgotten, and when even the Act of Confederation might be over-

looked, if necessary, to meet the situation. The situation is not what it has been in the past and changed circumstances call for extraordinary remedies.

As far as the distribution of labour is concerned, there are in British Columbia large Austrian, Italian and other elements who are naturally railroad builders and who could be very well conscripted and brought to the prairie provinces, or any other provinces, of this Dominion to repair the roadbeds which are so necessary to meet the transportation needs of the country and to help in winning the war.

I regret to 'have to refer to the province of Quebec. I would like to say personally that I was brought up with French Canadians and I have always had the highest regard for many of them, although I must confess that because of the recent attitude of Quebec I have not had the same regard for them as I had in the past. We heard the right hon. the leader of the Opposition (Sir Wilfrid Laurier) the other day pleading the cause of Quebec and telling us why the men of Quebec had not enlisted as we had expected they would do. I see no reason why 20,000-yes-75,000 French Canadians, with their narrow farms, 100 yards wide in some instances, should not be conscripted, taken to British Columbia and placed in their natural element, the lumberwoods. Whether this be done under the Military Service Act or not, I mean to suggest that their work should be done under military supervision and that they should be employed in the production of spruce lumber particularly, which is so important from the aeroplane point of view and therefore important to the allied cause. If 75,000 French Canadians in the province of Quebec were conscripted, taken into the province of British Columbia and kept there for six months or a year,-1 believe that when they returned to Quebec they would be better citizens and would educate the balance of that province.

At every meeting I had the honour of addressing throughout that great country that I have the honour of representing, two paramount questions were put to me. There was represented in thoise- meetings the red blood of both the former political parties, and they united in supporting me as the candidate of the Union Government. One point these people insisted on was that this Government should deal with a strong hand with the alien enemies I have referred to. The second was. that each province, in so far as the enforcement of the Military Service Act was concerned, should be stand-

CMr. Clements.!

ardized and should give its quota according to its population. I am here to advocate that and to do my utmost to carry it out regardless of whether the Government of the day sees, fit to do it or not.

Speaking for the northern part of British Columbia, I desire to say that the red blood of that country responded to the country's call irrespective of the Military Service Act. Every available naan coming within that category enlisted voluntarily and, I regret to say, in. many cases, made the supreme sacrifice. They came forward without any hesitation and offered themselves for their country's cause and the cause of civilization. If time permitted, I could point to dozens, and dozens of men fifty-five and sixty years of age who gave a wrong age so that they might get to the front and do their duty.

But I sayit is galling indeed to thefathers, mothers and daughters of those who so gallantly responded to the colours, to see these seditious elements surrounding them at every point on that coast, watching and waiting like a hawk watches a bird, to take advantage of the positions that these gallant men filled before they left for the front, waiting to swoop down upon every fishing or other privilege that they enjoyed. On several occasions I have brought these matters to the attention of the officers of the Government, and have referred to these seditious elements who. are always skating as close as possible to the thin ice so as to avoid arrest. Finally, some one would plead that he was a naturalized Canadian, it may be an Austrian living in our country as a naturalized citizen. The officials have told me that, under those conditions, it was impossible to deal with such individuals owing to their being naturalized. Well, Sir, if we have not the machinery to deal with them, it is high time that the Government instituted some machinery. There are thousands upon thousands in this country who should be dealt with with an iron hand.

Now, that is about all I have to say upon the subject. I hope that the few moments I have occupied this afternoon, in my feeble way, will give a great deal of food for thought to this Government in their efforts to deal with this very grave situation. The leader of the Opposition the other day invited the solution of the problem of unison in this Dominion. He was referring at that time to the difficulties between the provinces of Ontario and Quebec. It is all right to carry out an obligation, whether it be a private note or an international pledge, but, as I men-

tioned in my opening remarks, these are not times of peace, these are strenuous times for the Empire and the Dominion. While I am not speaking for the Government, I will say in conclusion, that if I had the power placed in my hands by the Almighty this afternoon, 1 would give my hen. friend the leader of the Opposition the solution for unison in this Dominion, which will be for the best interests of 'Canada in the future whether in one province or another. Ilf I had it in my power from the Almighty this afternoon, I would say this, Mr. Speaker: Before the clock tolled twelve to-night, I would institute in this country one flag, one school and one language.

Topic:   ALIEN LABOUR IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   MOTIONS ON ORDER PAPER BY MR.
Sub-subtopic:   ODEMENTS, MR. W. F. MACLEAN, AND MR. G. B. NICHOLSON DISCUSSED JOINTLY.
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UNION

Richard Clive Cooper

Unionist

Mr. R. C. COOPER (South Vancouver):

Mr. Speaker, as a new member of this House I rise with due humility to support the resolution moved 'by. the hon. member for Comox-Alberni (Mr. Clements). If there was an apology necessary, it is absolutely done away with by a date to be found on that calendar behind your back. On that date, three years ago, our men made history for Canada at Ypres. To-day, I find an attempt, supported from Halifax to Vancouver by every branch of the Great War Veterans' Association, by many manufacturers, by many other associations, an I by many independent men and women, to bring the enemy alien under some control. On this subject .1 wrote on the 11th April to the right hon. leader of the Government, asking if he would give me an expression of the intention of the Government on this matter. I have not yet received an answer. On March 26th, a petition was handed to the Prime Minister and the Government by the Great War Veterans' Association of Canada. I propose to read this to the House, and it will show what these men ask for.

March 26, 1918.

To the Right Honourable

Sir Robert L. Borden, P.C., K.C.M.G.,

Prime Minister, Ottawa.

Sir,-

May it please you to hear and give consideration to the humble petition of this gathering of representatives of the Great War Veterans' Association of Canada, -which follows:

Whereas there are in Canada a great number . of people of alien origin.

Therefore be it resolved that it is our opinion that the aliens of enemy origin in our midst should be employed in work of (National importance or in industries essential to the winning of the War, under proper surveillance, and their employer for the time being made responsible for them; and that their earnings over and above an amount equal to the pay and allowances -of a Canadian soldier be taken by the Government for War purposes: or, failing their

being employed that such alien enemies be interned.

Further that measures be taken at once to make the Military Service Act applicable to all allied aliens in the same manner and to the same extent as to the citizens of Canada, either by negotiating the necessary treaties or conventions with the remaining Allied countries, upon similar lines or the same as those provided for in the conventions recently adopted between the United States of America and Great Britain, or, failing the obtaining of such treaties or conventions, that such allied aliens be forthwith given the option of enlisting voluntarily in the Canadian Forces, or being deported to their country of origin as is being done by the Government of the United States under the Alien Slacker Bill just passed- by an overwhelming majority in the House of Representatives at Washington.

Further that no steps should be taken to call out the second or other class under the Military Service Act, or to return to France married men of the First Contingent, C.E.F., until the question of the disposition of the aliens has been settled in a manner satisfactory to the citizens of Canada, and that we urge the Government to take up -and deal with these questions without further delay.

I would say, Sir, that the Government failed to take any notice of these representations. In my own province of British Columbia, there have been large mass meetings held for the purpose of making the Government at least look into this matter, if it does nothing else. To-day, in British Columbia alone, we have a matter of more than 60,000 enemy aliens, who are practically allowed their liberty, who can do as they like, and over whom there is no control. I ask you to-day, with our young men going overseas to defend our shores in France, what is our position going to be if these aliens are left in practically uncontrolled freedom? lit- is not possible that we may have a repetition of the scenes enacted in Northern France, in Flanders, in Serbia, in Montenegro and in Northern Italy? It is possible. It may not be likely, but I commend it to the attention of the Government. What has been done to handle this question? I noticed in a paper the other day that it was proposed to form a garrison battalion. Presumably that is the only way they could be handled. Some of our industries in British Columbia, notably the railways and the mines, are practically controlled by enemy aliens of Austrian or German origin. -

These men have absolute liberty, and they earn anywhere from $4 to $10 or $12 a day. What do they contribute to the country? How do they help the country to carry on this war, which was saddled upon us by their own people? Absolutely nothing. In a few cases they have been persuaded, I believe, to subscribe to war loan, but war

loan is a good investment. If these men, particularly those in the coal mines, feel it incumbent upon them to work and earn a nice, daily wage, they do so. On the other hand, if they want to play baseball or go out into the woods on a sunny day, they do so. They care nothing about the fact that the people of Eastern Canada and the prairies are waiting for coal to keep them from freezing.

The Government has 'an anti-loafer law. What penalty does it provide? One hundred dollars and costs, or in default, six months' imprisonment with hard labour. Such a penalty may be all right for men of British birth, but it is not all right for the type of men who work in the mines and on the railways in British Columbia. These men have been taught from their earliest infancy that only by force can they get what they want, and I submit that they should be controlled by force. If six months is the penalty for offences against the anti-loafer law, then I think that in order to deal with the enemy aliens we must have a much more severe penalty than that. What is the penalty in Germany? It does not start at a minimum and work up to a maximum; it starts at a maximum and works down to a minimum. But the maximum penalty in Germany with our prisoners, is death, and I see no reason why the enemy alien here in Canada, should not, under similar conditions., be forced to pay that penalty if necessary.

As a reason for not handling this situation the Government say: we have an agreement with the labour unions of this country. Only last Friday the Prime Minister, when he was giving certain figures of enlistment, said that 227,000 skilled and unskilled labourers had gone overseas. These men from the labour unions who have gone to fight are surely entitled to some sort of consideration when they come back. To-day the ranks of labour are full of enemy alieus. I venture to say that at least one-third of the total membership of the labour unions in Canada consists of enemy aliens or aliens of neutral countries. Labour represents in Canada some 200,000 men. The number of men that Canada has so far sent overseas is 364,750. The balance, therefore, is as two to one, and I submit that the men who have gone overseas are more entitled to attention and consideration from the Government than those who remain behind to work and earn big wages.

It may be suggested that if we insist on enemy aliens in this country working, our

prisoners of war may be badly treated, or worse treated than they are now. I have under my hand a letter which I received this morning from the father of one of my men who was taken prisoner at Ypres three years ago the day after to-morrow. He says:

Now as regards the hoy. We have received a picture of him a few days ago, and a letter was the first in which he really made a murmur, and that was only, "Believe me, my chum and I have (fei-tainiy been through the mill." He looked pretty good, a little hard round the mouth but still as "straight as a die." The poor lad with him looked terribly ill.

This boy of nineteen, who went over with me, had no hard lines about his mouth when I saw him three years ago, but he has to-day. If you say that any action on our part to deal with enemy aliens in this country will affect our Canadian prisoners of war, you forget that Canadians in Germany cannot be subjected to greater indignity than that to which they are now subjected; that no more insults could be heaped upon them; that they could not be more starved than they are to-day. Their position, therefore, cannot be made easier by our being lenient with enemy aliens in this country. Our men in Germany to-day are earning thirty pfennings a day for their work. Thirty pfennings amounts to threepence- six cents-and the enemy alien in Canada, who has absolute liberty, earns $3, $4, $5, $10, $14 a day, and he does not care a snap of his finger about our authority.

Then, the Hague Convention. What is the Hague Convention? It has meant a good deal to the Allied powers; what has it meant to the Teutonic powers? Nothing at all. The Prime Minister on Friday mentioned the deportations from Lille; he spoke of the women who were sent back of the German lines in France. Yes, and I can tell you of a monument that has been raised at Bac St. Maur, a place now in the hands of the Germans, to the memory of four women of France who in 1914 were raped by the Germans; they were then covered with gasoline and burned. That is possible in Canada if we allow these enemy aliens uncontrolled freedom.

In my country, in the fisheries especially, we have many Scandinavians. Well, there are Scandinavians and Scandinavians. We* know that the Norwegians are friendly to us; they are more likely to help us than anything else. But what of the Swedes? These men are openly antagonistic to us; yet they go round filling our men's places and giving nothing in return for the liberty that is accorded to them. On Friday the leader of the Opposition denounced auto-

cracy in no uncertain tones. That may be all right from the standpoint of the citizen, but as a soldier I say that as long as this war continues, long live autocracy. It is the only way you can conduct a war. Think what would happen if, when an officer commanding a division gave an order, his brigadiers and officers consulted whether they should obey the order or not. Take the case of Russia. Russia consulted the people as to what she would do in the war-and look at her to-day.

I wish, in conclusion, to quote from the Prime Minister's speech on Friday last these great words:

As to our duty, the first line of defence Is held in Prance and Flanders; the second line of defence is here. Will those in the second line desert and betray the first? If such an outcome were possible, it would be to the everlasting disgrace of the Canadian people. Only those who have been among the men in the fighting line can realize with what faith and confidence the Canadian soldiers rely upon us for that aid and support which are their due; only those who have been among them can realize how intense a bitterness and disappointment would possess their souls if that aid should fail them. I beg you to remember that in this country we are all in one sense in the battle-line; that we must all discharge our duty with the same indomitable spirit as those who are holding back the German onset. May we not estimate that duty in the words of a great Frenchman: "Life was not intended as either a pleasure or a sorrow, but as a great duty committed to our charge and which we are bound to carry on and fulfil by the standards of honour." If -that is true of the individual life, is it not equally true of the national life? What we inherit from the past we hold in trust for the future; let us see to it then that Canada's honour is maintained and her escutcheon kept untarnished to the end.

Those are great words; but what are the feelings of our 364,000 men who have gone overseas if they know that here in Canada there will be no room for them when they do come back; that the enemy alien is protected in every way, and that the enemy alien and the neutral alien hold the fat jobs? Will they not feel that, although the Government have courageously enforced the Military Service Act and sent men overseas to aid them in the fighting line, they have been deserted in their home life, in regard to which they are entitled to some consideration just as they are entitled to be reinforced? The Government should seriously consider this question. There must be some means whereby the Government can control the present practically uncontrolled liberties of the enemy alien in Canada. There must be some means whereby the Government can make those enemy aliens contribute something towards the

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cost of the war which is being waged against us by the country of their birth. The Government should grapple with this matter without delay, because the people cf Canada, and, more especially, the people of the West of Canada, are tired of procrastination, and must insist on the Government dealing immediately with this question.

Topic:   ALIEN LABOUR IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   MOTIONS ON ORDER PAPER BY MR.
Sub-subtopic:   ODEMENTS, MR. W. F. MACLEAN, AND MR. G. B. NICHOLSON DISCUSSED JOINTLY.
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L LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux

Laurier Liberal

Hon. RODOLPHE LEMIEUX (Maison-neuve):

Mr. Speaker, I have listened with some surprise to the speech delivered by my hon. friend from Comox-Albemi (Mr. Clemente). I have followed his career since he entered thie House many years ago. He disappeared for a while. He left his good old county of Kent and went West. He followed the advice of the great American editor, "Go West, young man;" but I am sorry that, in coming back East, he has brought with him. very strange notions in regard to the unity of this country. At first sight, the object of hie motion is very commendable:

That, in the opinion of this House, all the regulations and Orders in Council respecting Alien Labour in Canada should be consolidated into one uniform law but that in framing such legislation due regard should be had to the local conditions and needs of the different parts of the Dominion.

The last portion of the motion could not be understood had the House not heard the comments made 'by my hon, friend, but the first portion of his motion is commendable. When the hon. gentleman undertakes to state how the enemy alien should be treated, he goes a little too far. The enemy alien must, in Canada as elsewhere, be treated according to ithe tenets of international law. No one is above international law, and no civilized country which took part in- the Hague convention in 1908 is above the regulations which were framed there by the representatives of those civilized nations.

Topic:   ALIEN LABOUR IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   MOTIONS ON ORDER PAPER BY MR.
Sub-subtopic:   ODEMENTS, MR. W. F. MACLEAN, AND MR. G. B. NICHOLSON DISCUSSED JOINTLY.
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UNION

John Allister Currie

Unionist

Mr. CURRIE:

What about Germany

and Austria?

Topic:   ALIEN LABOUR IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   MOTIONS ON ORDER PAPER BY MR.
Sub-subtopic:   ODEMENTS, MR. W. F. MACLEAN, AND MR. G. B. NICHOLSON DISCUSSED JOINTLY.
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L LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux

Laurier Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX:

Germany is without the pale of civilization. M.y hon. friend (Mr. Clements), I am sorry to say, discards international law. So did Bethmann Holl-weg, Chancellor of Germany, when, in 1914, he said to the British Ambassador that the treaty, which was binding on England, France, Russia and Germany, was a mere scrap of paper. When again the German Chancellor said: "Necessity knows no law," and "We must hack our way through," he was doing exactly what m.y hon. friend stated a moment ago-he was discarding

international law. He was speaking the same language as my hon. friend from Comox-Albemi. My hon. friend' from North Simcoe (Mr. Currie) interrupts me by saying: Wlhat about Germany? What about

Austria? A British soldier speaking in that way! Germany committed the awful murder of Edith Cavell and that of Captain Fryatt. Would my hon. friend say that it would be right for England to follow Germany's example.

Topic:   ALIEN LABOUR IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   MOTIONS ON ORDER PAPER BY MR.
Sub-subtopic:   ODEMENTS, MR. W. F. MACLEAN, AND MR. G. B. NICHOLSON DISCUSSED JOINTLY.
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UNION

John Allister Currie

Unionist

Mr. CURRIE:

No.

Topic:   ALIEN LABOUR IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   MOTIONS ON ORDER PAPER BY MR.
Sub-subtopic:   ODEMENTS, MR. W. F. MACLEAN, AND MR. G. B. NICHOLSON DISCUSSED JOINTLY.
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L LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux

Laurier Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX:

No, it would not toe right for England to follow Germany's example.

Topic:   ALIEN LABOUR IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   MOTIONS ON ORDER PAPER BY MR.
Sub-subtopic:   ODEMENTS, MR. W. F. MACLEAN, AND MR. G. B. NICHOLSON DISCUSSED JOINTLY.
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UNION

John Allister Currie

Unionist

Mr. CURRIE:

My hon. friend cannot

quote from the Hague convention any clause dealing with aliens. He is setting up a straw man and arguing from that. I should like him to quote the clause.

Topic:   ALIEN LABOUR IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   MOTIONS ON ORDER PAPER BY MR.
Sub-subtopic:   ODEMENTS, MR. W. F. MACLEAN, AND MR. G. B. NICHOLSON DISCUSSED JOINTLY.
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L LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux

Laurier Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX:

I listened to my hon. friend (Mr. 'Clements) and I heard him state to the House that as regards our treatment of aliens he made light of international law, because Germany knew no international law. My -answer is, that just because Germany is putting herself without the pale of civilization, Canada, being a civilized country, should not imitate Germany. We have, unfortunately, in Canada some people who are bound to out-Prussian the Prussians. The War-time Elections Act, passed by Parliament last year, was a Prussian act, nothing more and nothing less.

iSome hon. MEMBERS: Order.

Topic:   ALIEN LABOUR IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   MOTIONS ON ORDER PAPER BY MR.
Sub-subtopic:   ODEMENTS, MR. W. F. MACLEAN, AND MR. G. B. NICHOLSON DISCUSSED JOINTLY.
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Take it back.

Topic:   ALIEN LABOUR IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   MOTIONS ON ORDER PAPER BY MR.
Sub-subtopic:   ODEMENTS, MR. W. F. MACLEAN, AND MR. G. B. NICHOLSON DISCUSSED JOINTLY.
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L LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux

Laurier Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX:

There are sitting on the other side of the House gentlemen who stated it a few days ago.

Topic:   ALIEN LABOUR IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   MOTIONS ON ORDER PAPER BY MR.
Sub-subtopic:   ODEMENTS, MR. W. F. MACLEAN, AND MR. G. B. NICHOLSON DISCUSSED JOINTLY.
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UNION

John Allister Currie

Unionist

Mr. CURRIE:

I rise to a point of order, lit is not the first time that an hon. member has been expelled from the House of Commons for reflecting discredit upon the House of Commons, and I say that the hon. gentleman, in the manner in which he has stated his opinion in regard to the War-times Elections Act, is reflecting discredit upon this House, and he should be asked to take it back.

Topic:   ALIEN LABOUR IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   MOTIONS ON ORDER PAPER BY MR.
Sub-subtopic:   ODEMENTS, MR. W. F. MACLEAN, AND MR. G. B. NICHOLSON DISCUSSED JOINTLY.
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L LIB

Georges Henri Boivin (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Laurier Liberal

Mr. DEPUTY SPEAKER:

Order. I

hardly consider the point of order well taken. I did not judge from the expression used by the hon. member that he intended to reflect any discredit upon the House of Commons. If he did so, he should, of course, take it back.

Topic:   ALIEN LABOUR IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   MOTIONS ON ORDER PAPER BY MR.
Sub-subtopic:   ODEMENTS, MR. W. F. MACLEAN, AND MR. G. B. NICHOLSON DISCUSSED JOINTLY.
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L LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux

Laurier Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX:

Last year, Sir, the Government disfranchised the Galicians who,

although they came from Austria, were far from sympathetic with the Central Empires. The Galicians Should not have been deprived of their right to exercise the franchise as they came to Canada, they, the victims of the Austrians in Europe, solely to enjoy here the freedom which they had been denied for centuries under the Austrian flag. That is what I meant a moment 'ago when I qualified the War-time Election's1 Act as being nothing else but a. Hunnish and Kaiser-li'ke measure.

Topic:   ALIEN LABOUR IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   MOTIONS ON ORDER PAPER BY MR.
Sub-subtopic:   ODEMENTS, MR. W. F. MACLEAN, AND MR. G. B. NICHOLSON DISCUSSED JOINTLY.
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UNION

James Arthurs

Unionist

Mr. ARTHURS:

Will the hon. gentleman allow me a question?

Topic:   ALIEN LABOUR IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   MOTIONS ON ORDER PAPER BY MR.
Sub-subtopic:   ODEMENTS, MR. W. F. MACLEAN, AND MR. G. B. NICHOLSON DISCUSSED JOINTLY.
Permalink
L LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux

Laurier Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX:

No. Mr. Speaker, not

the hon. gentleman. My hon. friend from Comox-Albemi (Mr. Clements) has spoken, about the aliens, but he forgot to refer to the Japanese. Surely he should know that the Tories of British Columbia at the election of 1908 made the same splash over the Japanese as my hon. friend has made this afternoon, and that they were elected on the slogan of " A white British Columbia." Will my hon. friend tell me whether the Japanese are still coming to British Columbia? Will he not admit that his friends in British Columbia were wrong in advocating ithat drastic policy in 1908, if he remembers that at the beginning of this war the coasit of British Columbia, which is the coast of Canada, was protected by Japanese warships? My hon. friend, who, I am sorry to say would make a poor diplomat, when speaking of aliens referred to the French Canadians, of course. In the minds of many, naturally, the French Canadians are but aliens. I do not know how many centuries ago the forebears of my hon. friend came to Canada, but I do know that every (French (Canadian can claim three hundred1 years of ancestry in .Canada; so, for any one to refer to French Canadians as aliens, is simply to display his ignorance or his fanaticism.

Topic:   ALIEN LABOUR IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   MOTIONS ON ORDER PAPER BY MR.
Sub-subtopic:   ODEMENTS, MR. W. F. MACLEAN, AND MR. G. B. NICHOLSON DISCUSSED JOINTLY.
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UNION

Herbert Sylvester Clements

Unionist

Mr. CLEMENTS:

I wish to correct my hon. friend. I did not refer to the French Canadians as aliens at all, but referred to the unpatriotic sentiments of the French Canadians, and 1 still stick to that.

Topic:   ALIEN LABOUR IN CANADA.
Subtopic:   MOTIONS ON ORDER PAPER BY MR.
Sub-subtopic:   ODEMENTS, MR. W. F. MACLEAN, AND MR. G. B. NICHOLSON DISCUSSED JOINTLY.
Permalink

April 22, 1918