April 8, 1918

INCOME TAX.

L LIB

Mr. LESAGE:

Laurier Liberal

1. Is it the intention of the Government to amend the Act relating to Income Tax?

2. If so, does the Government propose to fix a scale of rates in the proposed amendments, having regard to the number of persons and dependents who may compose one's family?

3. Is it the intention of the Government to amend said Act with a view to establishing a system, now existing in very many countries, whereby a proportional deduction of income taxation is made, according to the number of persons and dependents composing one family?

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   INCOME TAX.
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UNION

Newton Wesley Rowell (President of the Privy Council)

Unionist

Hon. Mr. ROWELL:

Amendments of this character are not usually announced in advance.

Topic:   QUESTIONS.
Subtopic:   INCOME TAX.
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QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS.


Mr. BOYER; 1. What sum of money has been spent for repairs to the wharf at Graham, since 1911? 2. Who has superintended the works, and what are the names of the parties who have been employed thereat?



3. What amount has been paid to each of them, and at what rate per diem? 4. What are the names of the parties supplying materials, and what amount has been paid to each of them?


L LIB

Emmanuel Berchmans Devlin

Laurier Liberal

Mr. DEVLIN:

For a return showing the amount of land purchased 'by the Government at Camp Borden, the price paid, with a list of the names of those from whom the land was purchased?

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS.
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L LIB

Emmanuel Berchmans Devlin

Laurier Liberal

Mr. DEVLIN:

For a return showing the number of Agricultural Representatives appointed to represent the Minister of Agriculture at the Military Tribunals, by whom they were appointed, at what cost to the country, the expenses of each representative, the number of telegrams each representative sent out between December 1 and December 17, 1917, and the name of the representative appointed for Glengarry-Stor-mont.

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS.
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L LIB

Emmanuel Berchmans Devlin

Laurier Liberal

Mr. DEVLIN:

For a copy of ail correspondence respecting Orders in Council creating a paper commission, and subsequent Orders in Council respecting the same, which have passed between newspaper publishers in Canada, more particularly those publishers in Toronto, and the Government.

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS.
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L LIB

Emmanuel Berchmans Devlin

Laurier Liberal

Mr. DEVLIN:

For a copy of the Order in Council creating a paper commission, and also a copy of the subsequent Orders in Council in regard to the work of this commission.

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS.
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L LIB

Arthur Bliss Copp

Laurier Liberal

Mr. COPP:

For a copy of all correspondence, certificates, recommendations and other documents in reference to the granting of a total disability pension to Colonel R. H. Labatt.

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS.
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L LIB

Arthur Bliss Copp

Laurier Liberal

Mr. COPP:

For a copy of Orders in Council in reference to the appointment of Colonel Langton as Paymaster General in the Militia Department.

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS.
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HEREDITARY TITLES IN CANADA.

UNION

William Folger Nickle

Unionist

Mr. W. F. NICKLE (Kingston) moved:

That, in the opinion of this House, an Address should be presented to His Most Excellent Majesty the King in the following words:-

To the King's Most Excellent Majesty,

Most Gracious Sovereign,-

We, Your Majesty's most dutiful and loyal subjects, the House of Commons of Canada in Parliament assembled, humbly approach Your Majesty praying that Your Majesty hereafter may be graciously pleased to refrain from conferring any hereditary titles upon Your subjects domiciled or living in Canada, or any title or honour that will be held or can be used by, or which will confer any title or honour upon any person other than the person in recognition of whose services the honour or title has been conferred.

All of which we humbly pray Your Majesty to take into Your favourable and gracious consideration.

He said: Mr. Speaker, in rising, to support the resolution which stands in my name, it is only fit and proper that I should advise the House that I am making this motion instead of the hon. member from Peterborough (Mr. Burnham), whose privilege it was to introduce the subject to the House in 1914, because of his having informed me that he did not care this year to give the matter consideration. In speaking to me in reference to' the matter, he told me that he thought war conditions at the present time were so pressing, and that the responsibilities of the Government were so great, that it would not be right, fit, or proper that they should be worried with other anxieties at this time. While il appreciate the sincerity of the hon. gentleman's motives, I must say that I do not see eye to eye with him. It occurs to me that if there ever was a time when a subject such as this should be brought before the House, it is a time when the nation is at war, because if war teaches us anything it teaches us this: that when the country is at war and when the war is over, you are likely to have the greatest crop, if I might use that term, of decorations and recognitions that are from time to time seen.

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS.
Subtopic:   HEREDITARY TITLES IN CANADA.
Sub-subtopic:   MOTION BY MR. NICKBE FOR ADDRESS TO HIS MAJESTY NOT TO CONFER THEM.
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Hear, hear.

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS.
Subtopic:   HEREDITARY TITLES IN CANADA.
Sub-subtopic:   MOTION BY MR. NICKBE FOR ADDRESS TO HIS MAJESTY NOT TO CONFER THEM.
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UNION

William Folger Nickle

Unionist

Mr. NICKLE:

And, Sir, I think there is another reason why this matter should be brought before the House at this particular time, and it is that we have in Canada a Union Government, a Government that is supposed to have within its ranks representatives of the two great political parties in Canada, as well as representatives of Labour. And, I know from the address that was delivered to this House in 1914, that the Right hon. leader of the Opposition is not unsympathetic with the resolution that I' present to the House to-day fcr consideration, and I hope favourable decision. For these reasons I think the House should bear with me in presenting to it reasons why I think, first, that hereditary titles should not continue to exist in Canada, and secondly, why women should not bask, if II might use the expression, in the reflected glory of their husband's distinctions.

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS.
Subtopic:   HEREDITARY TITLES IN CANADA.
Sub-subtopic:   MOTION BY MR. NICKBE FOR ADDRESS TO HIS MAJESTY NOT TO CONFER THEM.
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Hear, hear.

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS.
Subtopic:   HEREDITARY TITLES IN CANADA.
Sub-subtopic:   MOTION BY MR. NICKBE FOR ADDRESS TO HIS MAJESTY NOT TO CONFER THEM.
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UNION

William Folger Nickle

Unionist

Mr. NICKLE:

I might say, Sir, if I were to go as far as my inclination takes me, my resolution would strike at the very root of the iniquity, because I have no sympathy at all with titular distinctions given to men in civil life. I am quite prepared

to admit the correctness of men in military life being given rank and distinction, because if the system is to prevail there must be distinctions by which those with higher rank have recognition and priority over those of lower rank; but when it comes to granting distinctions to men in civil life for the services they have rendered their state, for great munificence, or for outstanding ability in their profession or business, it is a procedure with which I have no sympathy. But, Sir, while in theory I might go farther than my resolution goes, yet I trust I. am not altogether blind to practical considerations. They say that when a man begins to remember the days of long ago, it is an evidence that age is creeping on him, and when I was endeavouring to secure some comparison as to how I might bring to the House my reason for not going as far in this matter as my desire would take me,

I cast my mind back to my student days at Queen's University, when Sir George Kirkpatrick, at one time Speaker' of this House, in addressing the students of my day, said: " If you want to roost high you have got to fly high, but ibe careful you do not fly over the roost." And that is what influenced me in restricting my resolution: I wanted to fly high, I wanted to roost high, but I did not want to frame my resolution so that a dozen or so men in this House would escape from their sense of obligation, and vote against it because the resolution was broader than their sympathies. For that reason I have restricted the resolution to hereditary titles and what I may call the reflected titles of women. .

Now, Sir, it has been said that in Canada we should have titles because they have titles in England; that England has developed an official aristocracy which is a very essential part of the Government, and if it is good for England it is equally good for Canada. I think we should examine the analogy, I think we should examine the source from which titles in England come, and I feel satisfied that from an examination of the source and of the development of the institution it will be apparent that conditions in England and conditions in Canada are totally different. Titles to-day in England are really only the picturesque effect of the days of feudalism. They are distinctions without the responsibilities of service. In the old feudal days in England and on the continent the granting of a title was a recognition, but it carried a duty. It was the giving of a privilege, but it carried an [DOT]obligation, and, as a rule, titles were granted in respect of territorial possessions.

Many of 'the members of this House have, .like myself, -been in England. I do not know whether I am a deeper dyed democrat than they are, but there was one thing that always grated upon me, and that was when a man rose to address an assemblage of Englishmen, an assemblage of Britishers, he began his address by, " My lords and gentlemen."

Some ho'n. (MEMBERS : Hear, hear.

Mr. NI'OKLE: My lords and gentlemen may be all right for England, or Britain, but from my point of view it is not all right for Canada. Britain has an aristocracy which is deeply rooted in her constitution, but no man can have talked with the common people in England, no man can have considered the conditions of the common people there without standing aghast and being shocked at the classy almost the caste, distinctions that there prevail.

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS.
Subtopic:   HEREDITARY TITLES IN CANADA.
Sub-subtopic:   MOTION BY MR. NICKBE FOR ADDRESS TO HIS MAJESTY NOT TO CONFER THEM.
Permalink
?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Topic:   QUESTIONS PASSED AS ORDERS FOR RETURNS.
Subtopic:   HEREDITARY TITLES IN CANADA.
Sub-subtopic:   MOTION BY MR. NICKBE FOR ADDRESS TO HIS MAJESTY NOT TO CONFER THEM.
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April 8, 1918