April 2, 1918

UNION

Arthur Meighen (Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Unionist

Mr. MEIGHEN:

The same principle exactly.

Topic:   DOMINION FOREST RESERVES AND PARKS ACT.
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UNION

Frederick John Fulton

Unionist

Mr. PULTON:

As this Bill effects the constituency which I represent, I would like to make a suggestion to the hon, the Minister of the Interior (Mr. Meighen) in regard to it. I think I am right in surmising that the cause of the amendment being brought in was a difficulty that arose in connection with certain mineral claims in the Highland Valley near Ashcroft. These claims -were located prior to the establishment of the forest reserves by the Act under which they are now constituted. When the owners came to apply for Crown grants they found that, the reserve being established, the Crown grant could not be obtained, as the Forest Reserves Act prevented the Dominion from transferring the minerals or surface rights to the province. In the case of these mineral claims, it is only right that the applicant should obtain a grant not only for minerals, but for surface rights-. I understand from the minister that has been recognized and that a Crown grant in re-spedt to these mineral claims will be issued in due course; that is, that the right to the minerals and the surface rights will be transferred to the province so that the province may grant them to the locator under its Mineral Act. It seems to me that, now that the Dominion Government has recognized the principle of allowing these forest reserves to be entered and the mineral claims within these reserves to :be developed, the.department might go farther in the matter. There is nothing in the amendment which provides for the granting of the surface rights along with the grant of the minerals. I feel sure that the locators of mineral claims, or the parties who undertake to develop these claims, will want to be assured as to what rights they will get. In my opinion,, they should get more than they can get under the provisions of the Forest Reserves Act, namely, a license or a lease. Mining companies are very sensitive, and they are likely to hesitate in the expenditure of a very large amount of capital unless they can have a more permanent title surface rights than can be obtained under the Forest Reserves Act at the present time. If, however, the minister does not feel that he can go that far, an assurance might be given in the Act itself that the surface rights will be dealt with at the same time that the mineral rights are transferred. These companies will then know what title they will get to the surface rights, and it is -absolutely necessary for them to have some rights upon the surface in order to develop the claims. I would suggest that in this clause 164

some provision be made whereby these men will know that they will get the right to use the surface.

Topic:   DOMINION FOREST RESERVES AND PARKS ACT.
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UNION

Arthur Meighen (Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Unionist

Mr. MEIGHEN:

of, as a matter of fact, by a general policy of leasing.

Topic:   DOMINION FOREST RESERVES AND PARKS ACT.
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L LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux

Laurier Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX:

What about your royalties?

Mr. M1EIGHEN: And the royalties have been reduced too in very many oases.

Topic:   DOMINION FOREST RESERVES AND PARKS ACT.
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L LIB
UNION

Arthur Meighen (Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Unionist

Mr. MBIGHEN:

Yes, from ten to five

cents in the case of coal. In the face of that policy laid down by Parliament, it would be scarcely fitting now to introduce legislation that would re-establis'h the old conditions, 'and in- relation to the very class of cases where they never formally obtained at all. Instead of moving in that direction, Parliament has been moving in the other direction, and moving very rapidly. So it appears to me the proper course now is to leave to the applicant his right to leasehold. I have no hesitation in stating that applicants wiho conform to the law of British Columbia and to our regulations will receive and be entitled to receive under those regulations, a lease of the surface rights, and I do not think he can ask for more.

Topic:   DOMINION FOREST RESERVES AND PARKS ACT.
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UNION

Frederick John Fulton

Unionist

Mar. FULTON:

I would like to draw

the attention of the minister to the fact that under this Bill the baser minerals will be transferred to the province to deal with, and the province will issue a Crown grant, notwithstanding the policy of the Dominion in adopting a lease. The only question is with regard to surface rights, and it would be rather anomalous that the miner should have a Crown grant of the minerals and only a lease, or license, with regard to the surface rights. He has a grant for all time of the minerals, and license or permission only and that for a limited period to use the surface rights. What I suggested was that there should be an assurance that He would get the right, possibly by way of a Crown grant, and if not in the form of a license or lease, to enable: him to work the minerals for which he will have the Crown grant.

Topic:   DOMINION FOREST RESERVES AND PARKS ACT.
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UNION

Arthur Meighen (Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Unionist

Mr. MEIGHEN:

I have given the assurance, provided, of course, the miner complies with the Provincial Mining Act and with the regulations of the department. He has to do that before he can make application.

Bill reported as amended.

Topic:   DOMINION FOREST RESERVES AND PARKS ACT.
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DAYLIGHT SAVING.


House in Committee on Bill No. 4, to provide for the time in Canada being in advance of the Solar Mean Time during the summer months.-Sir George Foster. On section 1-Act cited as The Daylight Saving Act, 1918.


L LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux

Laurier Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX:

I understand that the new legislation is in force in the United States.

Topic:   DAYLIGHT SAVING.
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CON
L LIB
CON

George Green Foster

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir GEORGE FOSTER:

Since 31st March.

Mr. LEMIEUI^]: And as a consequence our trains have to wait an hour at the boundary line?

Topic:   DAYLIGHT SAVING.
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CON

George Green Foster

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir GEORGE FOSTER:

At some points.

On section 2-Time advanced one hour.

Topic:   DAYLIGHT SAVING.
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CON

George Green Foster

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir GEORGE FOSTER:

Instead of Solar Time I propose to make an amendment by striking out the last line and substituting therefor:

in each province shall be one hour in advance of the time which under the law of the province is the time prescribed for such province, and if there is no time so prescribed, of the acoepted standard time.

In each of the provinces of the Dominion, with the exception, of Quebec, standard time is the accepted and legalized time. On inquiry from the Attorney General of Quebec I find that eastern standard time is the accepted time ini that province, but that there is no legalization of it.

Topic:   DAYLIGHT SAVING.
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L LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Laurier Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

What is meant *by "accepted time?"

Topic:   DAYLIGHT SAVING.
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CON

George Green Foster

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir GEORGE FOSTER:

It is the time

which is accepted in the province. Eastern standard time is carried out there, although it has not been legalized by Act of Parliament. The amendment provides that the time shall be one hour in advance of the standard time as it is legalized in all the provinces, or in any province in which it is not legalized, of the acoepted time, which in Quebec is eastern standard time.

M,r. BOYCE: Would it not foe well, Mr. Chairman, so to word this Bill as to provide that county or township councils may adopt the law or not, as they see fit? This *measure is going to work great hardship on the farmers. As a farmer, I have no objection to the people of the cities adopting such a measure as this if they wish to

spend the day playing ball and amusing themselves, we farmers are not going to find fault. But in this serious time, when we should all Ibe united with the object of producing food, the loyal farmers of Canada consider that no new legislation of this kind should be enacted. I trust that this suggestion will be carefully considered. Seventy thousand of our farmers are now fighting at the front trying to uphold the rights of the British Empire, and we should not- make it any harder for those who are at home to solve the great problem of producing food for the people. We should, therefore, he- permitted to use our own judgment in the matter of the saving of daylight. We have to get up early in the morning anyway, but we cannot start work until the dew dries, especially during haying and harvest time, and if this Bill passes we shall lose two hours of valuable time in the- evening.

Topic:   DAYLIGHT SAVING.
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UNION

Howard Hadden Halladay

Unionist

Mr. HALLADAY:

I do not believe that it is the intention of the Minister of Trade and Commerce to turn the sun back an hour or to compel the sun to rise in the West and set in the East. I represent one of the largest farming constituencies in the Dominion. I have farmed a number of years in Manitoba and Alberta, and I know whereof I speak. I cannot see how the passing of this measure wiill increase or decrease production in our part of the country. Show me the man who is not up with the sun at harvest time and working until the sun goes down, and I will show you a man who is not keeping pace with his neighbours. It is absolutely necessary that we gauge our work by the sun, not by the clock. We in the West are not troubled with -the dew, but the passing of this Act does not force our eastern farmer friends to get up one hour earlier than they do at present. I cannot see that the measure will adversely affect the farmers of Canada, but I can see that it will give the great army of indoor workers an extra hour of sunshine, and for that reason I am prepared to support the Bill.

Topic:   DAYLIGHT SAVING.
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L LIB

Daniel Duncan McKenzie

Laurier Liberal

Mr. McKENZIE:

I suggest to the Minister of Trade and Commerce that he is seriously encroaching on the Sabbath day. For at least two thousand years the Sabbath day in this country has begun at a certain hour; it has been so established by Divine decree.

Topic:   DAYLIGHT SAVING.
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April 2, 1918