March 26, 1918

UNI L

Michael Clark

Unionist (Liberal)

Mr. MICHAEL CLARK:

Having produced the condition in the mind of the Minister that at least some of his arguments are wrong, I think I will leave what has been said in support of the Bill, and offer a little more briefly my objections. My first objection has been hinted at on the other side of the House, although I do not understand why the objection should have come from my hon. friend who used it, because 1 understand he is supporting the Bill. I do not think it is wise unduly to increase the numlber of war measures. In other words, I do not think it is wise, I think it is unwise, to increase, without a very definite benefit in vierw, the number of laws that have to be enforced, even in war time, because if we pass a Bill we are going to enforce it. That, I think, will appeal to any citizen of a democratic country, and I am bound to repeat that the arguments by which this measure has /been supported in this House this afternoon certainly did not seem to me to make the change so assuredly beneficial as that we should add it to the list of these war-time measures or measures partaking almost of the nature of autocracy. One can understand the ease with which such a measure can be introduced in Germany, but I do not think we should unwisely increase the number of such measures in this country.

My second objection is a moral objection. I believe that early rising is a virtue. There are differences of opinion about that. The most distinguished opponent of that view is the famous British literary essayist, the beautiful writer, Charles Lamb, who demonstrated, of course, with all his particular wit and ability, the follies of rising in the morning; but I believe early rising is a virtue, and if gentlemen differ on the subject, that is another argument against the passage of the Bill. Clearly, if there be acute difference of opinion in regard to early rising, then we should let people lie in bed if they want to do so-governments should, in any event. But if it is a virtue to get up early or to go to bed late, that is a question that on the whole men and women would do well to settle for themselves. My hon. friend from Frontenac (Mr. Edwards) does not nave much use for the old proverb: " Early to bed, early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise." I am pretty certain about the health; I am pretty certain about the wisdom, for many of the men who have got very wise have read much, and read early in the morning. And about the wealth, if early rising does

not lead to a quantity of wealth, in the case of the farmer-and here I am sure may hon. friend from Frontenac will not disagree with me-it is welbgotten wealth anyway, and I would rather have one well-gotten dollar than ten ibadly-gotten dollars. Therefore, there is very much to he said for the statement that a dollar made in the early hours of the day is worth ten dollars made at a later hour. But my point is this: that unless there is some good and solid reason for this change, it is a matter that ought to be left to be settled by 'the individual, whether it be a moral practice to rise early in the morning or not.

My third objection is one that has not been taken any notice of, so far as I know, during the debate, and I have listened to the discussion with extreme care. In Great Britain and Ireland there is one time, Greenwich time, that applies to the whole country. You have the same thing in France and in Germany. In this country we have a great deal of difficulty, owing to the size of the country, to adapt ourselves to the operations of the sun. As every hon. gentleman in this House knows, we have to change our Clocks to a certain extent now so as to get on reasonable terms with the sun. We have to divide our country into sections. The practical difficulties of that are great enough, but this Bill, so far as I can understand it, proposes to make the difficulty greater by altering the time still further an hour as between the clock and the sun. What will be the effect of that? I do not know whether this question has been argued in the House of Representatives where they seemed to carry the Bill so easily. At the eastern edge of each section, people are rising one hour before the sun's time now.

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An hon. MEMBER:

About half an hour.

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UNI L

Michael Clark

Unionist (Liberal)

Mr. MICHAEL CLARK:

Nearly an hour. I never like to err on the side of extreme statements, but if you alter the time an hour in each section, at the eastern edge the people are rising an hour before the sun's time. If this measure becomes law, you will increase by another hour those difficulties which have beer spoken of. You will increase a difficulty which is already a real, practical difficulty in the life of the people in this country. That is why I said to begin with that the precedent of Great Britain carries me no distance whatever. Our conditions are different from those in Great Britain, and this partic-rar condition introduces a very great practical difficulty into this question. As a matter of personal experience I may say that the making of

hay on my own farm, which happens to be near the western end of the section, has to be postponed every day, and in the case of the people who live in the eastern part of the section in which I .live, they will have to postpone the commencement of their real' day's work still further, and. a very great difficulty will be placed in the way of hay-making and other matters. Mr. Speaker, I have practically nothing more to say, and I do not need to ask yon to suppose it is six o'clock to make an expeditious change in the time, as this Bill is proposing to do. I hope the Government is not staking its fate on this measure. I am anxious, at least, to give the new Government a trial, and I should not like them to fall upon a question upon which they had a good deal of guidance as to public opinion last year. If they do stake their fate upon the measure, then I shall have to do what one vote will do to put them out of power.

At six o'clock, the House took recess

After Recess.

The House resumed at eight o'clock.

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PRIVATE BILL.

WESTERN POWER COMPANY OF .


Mr. F. B. STACEY (Westminister District) moved the second reading of Bill No. 10, to enable the Western Power Company of Canada, Limited, to own and operate the railway of the Western Canada Power Company, Limited. He said: In moving the second reading of this Bill I have only a very few words to offer. I understand that by previous legislation the Western Canada Power Company, Limited1, reorganized under the name of the Western Power Company of Canada, Limited. The original company had poweT to operate a certain short railway, and in the reorganization, by some omission, 'this railway was not included. The object of this Bill is to grant the new company power to operate the railway that was operated by the previous company.


L LIB

Rodolphe Lemieux

Laurier Liberal

Mr. LEMIEUX:

Who are the directors of the company?

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UNION

Frank Bainard Stacey

Unionist

Mr. STACEY:

I cannot say offhand, but the manager's name is Mr. William McNeil.

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Motion agreed to, and Bill read the second time.


DAYLIGHT SAVING.


Consideration of the motion of Sir George Foster for the second, reading of Bill No. 4, to provide for the time in Canada being in advance of the solar mean time during the summer months, resumed. Mr. A. R. MeMASTER (Brorne): In listening to the debate on this interesting Bill this afternoon, I was struck with one important fact. I had thought that when the Government brought down a Bill, that Bill crystallized the united wisdom of the party which the Government represented on that subject, and I was somewhat surprised, Mr. Speaker, to see that the heaviest attacks upon the Bill came from gentlemen sitting on your right hand. There were .some remarkĀ® made about the Bill which I think require some consideration. There was that argument iin favour of the Bill that by advancing the clocks of this country one hour, we should succeed in raising the moral tone of this, country-" the moral uplift," I believe were the words employed by one of the speakers this afternoon. I am as anxious as any one to see the moral tone of this country raised, but II should imagine that if that could be obtained by any form of procedure such as this, moral reformers long ago would have set forward the clock many hours. I have the honour, although I practice law in Montreal, to represent an agricultural community. I wish to see production increased, and if this Bill in my opinion would increase production, I would lend whatever force my voice had in its support. But, not being a practical farmeT, like a good lawyer I am governed by the opinions of those who know better than myself; I have reference to authority, which is what lawyers do when they have a difficult question to consider. Now I should take it that the informed agricultural authority of this House is expressed by the agriculturists who have spoken from the different provinces of this Dominion against the Bill this afternoon, and therefore 1 think it would be unwise at this time to pass it. If a vote is taken on this Bill, although I am as anxious ae any one to have production increased, as the information which lies, .before me is that it will not increase but decrease production, T shall he obliged to vote against it. Mr. P. R. Du TREMBLAY (Laurier-Outre-mont): I do not intend to make any lengthy remarks on this Bill, as I think the ground has been pretty well covered by hon. gentlemen this afternoon. I do not see how this Bill would .affect the farmers. The fact is, farmers rise early in the morning anyway; they begin work at five or six o'clock, so I do not see how this Bill would help or harm them. It would rather affect the people in the cities. It would be a good improvement, especially for the labourers living in the cities, if this measure became law. It would give them an hour in the afternoon to get a rest, especially in the summer time. I understand that this principle has been accepted by the union men of the city of Quebec. I would have liked very much to have had some more information from the right hon. the Minister of Trade and Commerce (Sir George Poster) this afternoon as to whether the labour unions in Canada have been asked what itihey think about this question and what they say as to the wisdom of passing this Bill. For the reasons which I have stated, I shall support the Bill. It is an advanced movement on. the part of the Minister of Trade and Commerce, and not merely an advance of an hour in the time. It is certainly not in accordance with the ordinary policy of the right hon. gentleman. Probably this will be one of the few opportunities given to me to support one of his measures. However, on this question, I think I would well represent the interests of my people by giving my vote for this Bill.


L LIB

Joseph Alfred Leduc

Laurier Liberal

Mr. J. ALFRED LEDUC (Westmount-St. Henry):

individually rising earlier in the morning if we so desire. But I contend that the advantage and usefulness of this Bill will be almost entirely negatived unless the change is brought forward in such a way that the principle is adopted by every one. The man who rises an hour earlier in the morning in the abseftce of the enactment of this Bill will find that he can do very little unless his neighbour is also up at the same time so that. he may be enabled to do business with him; otherwise, he might as well remain in bed himself.

The hon. member for Bed Deer (Mr. Clark) raised the point that it would be quite possible for us to use the hours of daylight without the enactment of a Bill. I may say, Mir. Speaker, that I do not care to put my opinion against that of some of the experienced members of this House, but I believe that the chief reason why this Bill should pass is based upon the fact that we are all creatures of habit. To-day, practically all our activities are confined to certain definite hours. We rise, retire, go to business, go to church and to the theatre at a certain fixed hour. Children go to school at a certain fixed hour. In fact, all our waking activities are based on a certain definite system based on the clock, and it has become a fixed habit with us to do that. Now, the waking activities or all of us are so inter-related that, in order to secure the greatest amount of efficiency, it is necessary that we also co-ordinate those activities, which is absolutely impossible, I contend, except by some such definite system as is fixed by the clock. Now, here is the point to my mind: this habit of working, or playing if you like, according to the hours of the clock is a constant one. The hours which we have for rising, retiring, playing, going to meals, or going to church, or for any other activity in which we may engage, are the same in winter as in summer, in fall as in spring. During the winter no object could be gained by changing the hands of the clock, because the hours of daylight in winter are so short that we already use in our daily activities all of the daylight which we have during the winter hours. But as the spring advances our habits remain the same; we still do everything according to the hours of the clock; but the balance otherwise is disturbed. The sun does not rise at the same hour; the balance is gradually disturbed; and as the sun advances we find that we are wasting in bed hours of daylight, and using at the conclusion of the day, for the purpose of pleasure or business, as the case may be,

for at least our waking activities, the hours of darkness at the other end of the day.

Now, the practical effect of moving the hands of the clock forward one hour in the spring is, as my hon. friend from George Etienne Cartier (Mr. Jacobs) said of Joshua, that we actually make the sun, not to stand still, but to rise one hour later and to set one hour later, so that we find in the morning, instead of attempting to sleep during the hour of daylight, that we have the darkness during which to take our rest, which is the proper time, and at the conclusion of the day, we have until nine or nine-thirty for our daylight .activities. The man who has formerly had to lay down his work, his spade or rake if engaged at production, will find that he can work until nine-thirty, and so on. It is unnecessary to dwell at any length on the advantages that will arise from this practice; they will occur to almost every man.

But I do believe this, that hon. members have, perhaps, allowed themselves to /be influenced rather too much by the objections that have been raised to the Bill than by the many manifest advantages to 'be gained by its enactment. Practically the only olbjection that I think carries any weight is the one advanced first by the hon. member from the city o.f Chatham (Mr. McCoig), and that is. on. account of the farming interests. I have, of course, heard the objection that has been raised, that it was undignified to interfere with the clock. Well, to paraphrase a biblical saying, the clock was made .for man and not man for the clock. About a year ago I read a report on the subject taken from an English publication, and practically the only objection that was made there, and 'which I think you will all fully appreciate, was made by a gentleman who stated that he could not see why anybody shoulld want to do away with the beautiful electric light, and it turned out that he was a director of the electric light company. The one valid olbjection-I think it is not a very strong one-is on the part of the farming community. The statement is made that, if the hours of work conclude one hour earlier under this Bill the men who are hired for farm work will quit that much earlier, and the interests of production will suffer. Well, I am quite ready to take the word of the men who state that this is apt to occur; but so far as my experience of the farm goes-and I still think 'that it obtains-or, at least, I think it still obtains in the part of the /province from which I come-the farmers do not govern them-

18 X

selves by the clock at all. They get up with the sun and they do not go to bed with the sun. They work in the fields until the sun sets and then they do the chores afterwards. So I do not think it will affect the farmer to the degree that, perhaps, we have .been led to believe. In any case, Mr. Speaker, it is well worth while trying the experiment. I believe there is no doubt whatever that the advantages that will follow the enactment of this Bill will outweigh any of its disadvantages. And if we do find that, during the course of the year, the disadvantages are very serious, the House can repeal the Bill next year.

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UNION

William Smith

Unionist

Mr. WILLIAM SMITH (South Ontario):

I do not desire to waste a great deal of time over this Bill, but it appears to me, as .an old member of this House, and representing the interests that I do in the county of Ontario, that I should say a few words. And in my remarks to-night I may make some statements that may not have the sympathy .altogether of the members of this Government. And allow me to say this, at the outset; when I say that I am not asking from this Government or from anybody in this country any particular favours^

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Some hon. MEMBERS:

Hear, hear.

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UNION
?

Some hon. MEMBER:

Hear, hear.

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UNION

William Smith

Unionist

Mr. SMITH:

When I say that it does

appear to me that this Government, or the hon. minister who is introducing this, question, has not consulted one of the great interests of this country, .and that is the farmers of Canada. And. when I say that, looking back over the past-not 'including the years when the Conservative party have been in power, but back of that-and. trying to look into the future, I cannot see for the life of me where the farmers are going to get a great many favours from this Government. Now, looking back I cannot find where the farmers have been for a moment considered, .and looking into the future I do not expect that they are going to be considered. And when I say that, I do it for two reasons. In the first place, I do not expect any consideration from this Government; and, in the next place, I d:o not want it. This Bill, as I understand it, affects in .a general way the people of Canada. It has been considered outside of our country, in the country to the south of us, and in the Mother Country. In the United States they have taken it into their serious consideration and have adopted it. The

Mother Country has done likewise. But there are conditions in both of these countries very different from what we find in Canada. Now, we have just ae much daylight to-day as we had when I was a boy, and that is a good many years ago-. We have just as much daylight to-day as we had a hundred years ago, and we are going to change our - course out of consideration for this Government. I will repeat that we are enjoying as much daylight to-day as we ever did. I happen to be one of the few members of this House directly interested in agriculture. My life has been spent upon the farm, and if adequate reasons could be given why we should change our method of living I should be quite prepared to do .so. But, in view of the experience of the past, I can see no reason why we should adopt the procedure recommended here. We are being told that we should be able to produce more. Take my own. farm for example. In whose time are my men going to make this production? They will get this extra time, and the next morning they will return to duty after having done their best work for themselves. During the last ten years I have been a fairly close observer of agricultural matters. A comparison has been made to-day between the work done in the morning and that done in. the evening.. There can be no question but that there is a great difference. We have in the spring a certain amount of frost and a certain amount o-f r-ain. We cannot go on in the early morning with certain farm work, and yet we are being told that there must be greater production. How is it going to be done? The best hour in the whole 24 is that between five and six o'clock in the evening, which is going to be cut off. Do you mean to tell me that my farm employees living near towns of considerable size, are going to do as I tell them? Will you tell tbem, " You must- continue your work," and expect them to obey implicitly? No, they are .going to spend the hour at their disposal in the town, and yet this precious Government of ours is asking us for greater efforts towards increased production. I do not think the Minister of Trade .and Commerce (Sir George Foster) has taken the advice of the farmers of the country in respect to the introduction of this legislation. I know what their opinion is, and I say unhesitatingly and advisedly, that you cannot find a farmer in the whole country, from the Atlantic to the Pacific, who desires this change to he made. You often hear the statement, " The greatest good for the greatest number." Is this legislation likely to

result in the realization of that idea? There have been times in the last ten years when it was quite impossible to turn a wheel upon the land in the morning. Rain had soaked the ground so thoroughly that machinery would not turn upon it, but later in the day, between, five and six o'clock, that difficulty disappeared. With such a restriction as is proposed here, how will it he at all possible to carry out the enhanced production so strongly urged? I am just as strong an advocate that the farmers of Canada shall take their proper position and pay their fair proportion of taxation as anybody, but I say to the hon. gentleman who has introduced this Bill, "For heaven's sake leave the farmers alone." I admit the farmers do not know everything, hut they are thoroughly conversant with their own business, and no outsider can tell them what is best to do. If the hon- gentleman is determined to force this measure upon the House and upon the country, he may find out in the course of time that whilst the farmers of Canada have been hewers of wood and drawers of water, they are not going to Continue in that humiliating position forever. I tell the Minister, of Trade and Commerce that, great as he may deem this Bill to be and much as it may he in the interest of some people in this country, he may find later on that all those people who have been doing things for the Union Government may pull back the stake.

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UNION

Donald Sutherland

Unionist

Mr. D. SUTHERLAND (South Oxford):

I have followed with a good deal of interest the debate which has so far taken place on this Bill, and more especially the arguments which the Minister of Trade and Commerce advanced in his usual masterly manner in its support. I had not intended to say anything on the question, although I have my own opinion with regard to it. I come from a constituency which is very evenly divided as to rural and urban population, and I have not received a request from anyone in that constituency, either last year or during the present year, to support or oppose such a measure. I have been very much impressed by the arguments made by those who favour the Bill. I cannot help but feel that there has been some deception practised, if I may use the term, in favour of the adoption of this Bill. Reference has been made to the statement of Mr. Gompers in the United States when he gave the true version as to why there was such a strong desire for a Bill of this nature, which was that the people would have greater opportunities for leisure and outdoor exercise. Any one who has closely ob-

[Mr, Smith. 1 .

served the people who are agitating for the enactment of this measure realizes that their anxiety is not so much to increase the production of the country at the present time as it is for greater opportunity to enjoy themselves. The agitation is being waged by those who are anxious to have greater opportunities for bowling, tennis, motoring and things of that nature. These people speak about the desirability of daylight saving and the advantages of summer time. If you could increase the length of summer time I would heartily favour such a measure; that is to say, if a month could be taken off the winter and added to the summer, but I cannot see that the argument has any foundation whatever. I do not *see that such an arrangement is going to effect the saving of daylight in any particular. But what I am alarmed about is: At this particular time when we ought to look at questions soberly and realize the seriousness of the conditions which confront us, when we hear about people in the Old Land having to draw in their belts,- and they are prepared to do it,-we must realize that production in this country is the most important problem that is facing our people to-day. Those who are not physically fit to take up arms and beat the enemy should devote their entire energies towards increasing production in this country, because, judging from what is taking place on the Western front, we must not be at all surprised if this conflict rages for years and years to come. Is it a time for leisure and sport? No. It is a time to look on the question soberly and consider what the effect will be. Why is it we have been agitating our minds for years past as to why there was a movement from the country to the city? People say that those in the country labour too long, and that advantages are lost, and, therefore, the people will not remain there. The hon. member for South Ontario (Mr. Smith) points out what will happen with regard to employees when they'find the people of the neighbouring towns out playing tennis, bowling, and so forth. Can you expect these men to stay on the farms and increase the production of the country under these conditions? People say: "Look what we will grow in towns and cities if we have more time to ourselves after the day is over." That is all very well. The hon. member for South Toronto (Mr. Hocken) says it is estimated they can raise a million dollars worth of food products there. I have lived in Toronto for several years, and my

observation was that the man who grew vegetables Rid. most of the work early in the morning, .and not in the evening. In the evening he was prepared to rest. You wil1 find that is the ease in the towns and cilties throughout the country. The man who raises vegetables, to meet the requirements of the people, does it in the morning when it is cool. I do not believe there is any force in that argument at all. I believe the effect will not be good. I do not think that this is a time to introduce freakish legislation. It will be time enough, if it is demonstrated in other countries that this is a good measure, to introduce it at some future time; the Lord knows we have enough to do at the present time.

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UNION

Samuel Francis Glass

Unionist

Mr. S. F. CLASS (East Middlesex):

When this question was before the House last year I felt it my duty, in the interest of those I represent, to oppose it. If I were asked the reason why I opposed it then, and the reason why I now oppose it, I would admit that, aside from the interest of the constituents whom I represent, 1 would find some difficulty in answering. But, Sir, I want to say that the hon. members of this House who have discussed the attitude of the farmers of this country have spoken in entire accord with the experience of the people of my own district. Every township council, every county organization, all the organizations of the district which are in session for the purpose of considering the interests of agriculturists, have expressed their opposition to this Bill. I listened with a great deal of interest to the hon. member from Kitchener (Mr. Euler), and I was led to conclude, after hearing his remarks, and the remarks of other members who represent what might he called industrial constituencies, that there is a line of demarcation or division on this question, and that those who represent the interests of agriculture are opposed to the scheme, and those who represent sections of the country which have industrial concerns are in favour oif it. But I also find that, so far as labour is concerned, there is by no means unanimity with reference .to it, because only last week, in the city of London, one of the labour organizations placed on record its opposition to this Bill. The county council of Middlesex met last Saturday afternoon, the time fixed by the province of Ontario for all county councils throughout the province to meet, to take seriously into consideration the need of unusual effort to stimulate greater production this year, and advocated the very principles enunciated by my hon. friend the member for South Oxford (Mr. Sutherland)

and the hon. member for South Ontario (Mr. Smith), that it'simply meant, so far as they were concerned, that they could not possibly achieve the best results in production if the time were changed.. I asked a farmer in my district, when ! was last at home, " What is the objection of the farmers to this Bill," because I wanted to be enlightened, and he said, as the hon. gentleman from South Ontario also said, that the very best hours of the day for the farmer are those between five and seven at night, the very hours the .measure proposes to cut out and for which they will substitute the hours in the morning. By cutting out those two. hours you are taking away more than would he represented by three or four hours of the morning, because in the early morning hours, as has been stated, the ground is not fit fo.r operation, the heavy dew preventing any work in harvesting at that early hour. He also said that farmers, have to look, to an extent, to assistance from industrial labour in order to. give greater production, and the organized labour men who come out to the country to a&sist the .farmers have certain regulated hours, and notwithstanding the fact that they are assisting in the production of the country, they make their hours of labour conform largely to the regulations that govern labour unions in cities and towns. I think we are taking away from the farmer a valuable space o,f time for which we give him no equivalent. The hon. member for South Oxford (Mr. Sutherland) has pointed out the absurdity of " daylight saving." There is no saving o.f daylight whatever. This was tried in London two years ago. It was brought forth as a very desirable measure and had the support of the board of .trade and the city council, and the citizens, were unanimously behind the proposition and wished to try it out. They experimented with it for about two months, and they were so tired of it that every labour union and every organization which had asked to have this proposition introduced, with equal force opposed, it and asked for its repeal, and it was repealed in midsummer. That is the condition that prevailed two years ago. 1 am ready to admit that in the United States, in industrial centres, there is a strong sentiment amongst labour unions and a class of labour men that this change is desirable. It only shows that there is a difference of opinion amongst that class as well as amongst the members' of this House, but 1 think I am right in saying that there is absolutely no doubt about

the opposition to this Bill in all parts of the Dominion of Canada so far as the farming interests are concerned. I cannot support this measure in justice and in deference to the opinion of the people whom I represent here. Every organization in the district which I represent which is interested in agriculture has placed itself on record as opposed to this Bill, and I have more letters from all parts of my district expressing opposition to this measure than I have had in respect to any other measure presented in this House.

It is natural that we should have differences of opinion in this House. Personally, I cannot see how it is going to make a great deal of difference to the labouring man or to the agriculturist if this measure is passed. The farmer works from sunrise to sunset in any event. But there is this point which was made by the person to whom I referred. This farmer opposed this measure for the reason that under the changed conditions that exist at the present ' time a great deal of industrial labour is being forced out on to the farms and a great deal of industrial labour is also going voluntarily on to the farms, and an endeavour is being made to organize industrial labour so as to let as-much as possible get out on the farms to help production. The farmer makes a strong point there, namely, that this labour, which has certain regulations governing the hours of toil in industrial centres, will want to be governed by the -same regulations when it goes to the country. From that point of view the farmer naturally sees a very strong reason to oppose the Bill.

I regret very much that I was not in the House to listen to the remarks made by the Minister of Trade and Commerce in favour of the Bill, but last year he introduced a similar Bill which was thoroughly discussed, on that occasion, and I find that the nature of the opposition to it to-day is the same as it was a year ago. So far as the farm interests are concerned, there is a prejudice and an opposition to the Bill that cannot be overcome.

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UNION

Simon Fraser Tolmie

Unionist

Mr. S. F. TOLMIE (Victoria City):

I have listened with a great deal of interest to the discussion that has taken place this afternoon and evening. I feel that, representing a city constituency, I must support the measure. It will be of tremendous advantage to all workers in cities to have an extra hour of sunshine and fresh air in the evening. In the city of Ottawa alone it will affect thousands of people who have to put in the greater part of the day inside build-

ings where they do not get any sunshine. Under those conditions I think, it will be very beneficial, particularly so when we find that such diseases as tuberculosis and others are prevalent in the country. As a farmer and stock man I can see no real objection to this measure from the farmer's standpoint. I am ispeaking now particularly of the Pacific Coast section. If the farmer will use a little judgment in handling his help, he will easily overcome any little arguments that to-day have been presented against this measure. I was very much interested in what was said by the hon. member who wished to have his summer extended. I can advise him if he will go to the city of Victoria he will have no difficulty in having it extended several months.

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March 26, 1918