March 19, 1918

UNION
UNION

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Unionist

*Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

By Canada, with possibly some assistance through the credits obtained in the United States.

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UNION

Samuel Hughes

Unionist

Sir SAM HUGHES:

;i2

sponds in its fumctio-ne very .largely with the War Trade Board which has been established. in ithe United States.. It is under the chairmanship of Sir George Foster and Mr. F. P. Jones is vice-chairman. It is to see that materials are not wasted in nonessential industries and to make recommendations with regard to the regulation erf imports o.r exports. It i* to see, in cooperation with the War Trade Board of the United States that the resources of the tw.o countries which should be used for essential war .purposes shall be so used and not devoted to less important purposes. It has other important powers and duties which are set forth in. the Order in Council. The gentlemen wiho- .compose it are men of great ability and experience; they are devoting their full time and energy without remuneration to. the work, and I am confident that they will render excellent service to the country.

In addition, we have given our attention to abolishing patronage absolutely in respect o.f all purchases. Hon., gentlemen who were members of this House in the last Parliament will recollect that in. the' spring of 1915 the War Purchasing Commission was established for the purpose of controlling the purchase of all .articles required by the Government for the purposes of w.ar. It has done good work .and given, excellent service; the gentlemen who compose it have given their services freely and voluntarily as a patriotic duty. We .have passed an Order in. Council that not only war purchases but purchases1 of .all articles., commodities or materials- required by the Government shall be made through the War Purchasing Commission, and by tender and contract.

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L LIB

Wilfrid Laurier (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Laurier Liberal

Sir WILFRID LAURIER:

Who are the

members of the commission?

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UNION

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Unionist

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

Hon. H. Laporte, -of .Montreal, chairman; Mr. Gault, of Winnipeg, and !Mr. Gundy, of Toronto. On the retirement of Sir Edward Kemp from the board when he went overseas, (Mr. Laporte was appointed chairman, and Mr. Gundy became the third member of the hoard.

We have had under our consideration necessary relief in -connection with the appalling disaster at Halifax. I shall speak more fully as to this at a later date. A commission was appointed of three very capable men, Mr. T. IS. Rogers, Judge Wallace and Mr. Fo.w-ke, wiho are devoting their whole dime to the work. Recently they -made a report, which has .been laid on the table of the House, and later in the session, the [DOT]Government will have certain proposals to present" with respect to relief. The princi-

pie which has been adopted is to make restitution to small householders whose claims are not more than $5,000, and in respect of claims .above $5,000 to proceed upon the principle of just and reasonable relief, not upon the principle of restitution.

The Minister of Railways and Canals has hhd under very serious consideration the provision o.f rolling stock and equipment for railways. We are confronted with the immediate acquisition of some ten thousand miles of railway, -which will bring the total state railway mileage of this country up to about fifteen thousand. 'It is useless for us to have that railway unless it is properly equipped. 'The great crops that we hope for during the present year and next year, which are so essential for war purposes, must be transported

and, more than that, expeditiously. Full details of what we propose will he given at a later date.

I should also mention that the Soldier Settlement Board has been established -under the Act passed last session. The Minister of the Interior is devoting a large part of his time to the administration of the Act. The members of the board are, I -believe, -presently -proceeding to the western provinces in order that they may have under their immediate supervision the arrangements by which soldiers.can be placed on the land during the present year.

Negotiations have been entered into with the United States in regard to certain matters of difference respecting the fisheries. It is too late for .me to .speak of this as 1 intended to do. The Order in Council embodying the results have been placed on the table of the House. I believe that the results are in the interests of both countries, especially as they assist in the production of a greater quantity of food than would otherwise he possible.

With respect to fuel control, we have had very important and difficult questions to deal with, and we found it necessary in this country to place ourselves upon an equality of inconvenience with the United States of America in respect to certain restrictions. I do not think the Canadian people complained of that. As a matter of fact, they would have no reasons to complain of it. In so far as the provision of fuel is concerned, the United States Government treated Canada precisely in the same way as it treated all the States of the Union, and we should have the most grateful appreciation of the attitude of the United States in that regard. So when, in the judgment of the Government of the United -States, it became necessary

to impose certain restrictions in that country, we could do no less than impose corresponding restrictions here. We have done that; and subsequently we have had conferences with the provincial governments with regard to the intensely vital question of fuel supply for the present year. The House may anticipate that at no distant date new regulations of a very comprehensive character will be placed before it by the Minister of Trade and Commerce.

There has also been effected with the United States a Military Service Convention, the text of which will be laid on the Table of the House as soon as it is ratified. The services of Mr. Newcombe, Deputy Minister of Justice, and of Col. Maclnnes of the Department of Militia and Defence were requested by the Government and these gentlemen proceeded to Washington. There had been a great deal of delay previously in reaching a conclusion, but after a visit of a week or ten days they were able to arrive at an understanding which, I think, is in the interest of both countries, and which the governments of both countries regard as fair and reasonable.

In addition to all that I have mentioned, we have had a great many conferences first and last, during the past three or four months. We have had two formal conferences with the Labour organizations and a great many informal conferences. We have had the conference, to which I have alluded, with the provincial governments. There has been a conference with the Women's organizations. We have had conferences with the returned soldiers' organizations. At every one of these conferences interesting and important questions were taken up and, on the whole, I believe that satisfactory results were reached.

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L LIB

Jacques Bureau

Laurier Liberal

Mr. BUREAU:

It has been stated that there has been an agreement between the United States Government and the Canadian Government in regard to enrolment for military service. Very often Americans who are working on this side of the line ask whether under this agreement they can enlist with the Canadian forces or whether they must go to the United States in order to enlist. Can the Prime Minister answer that question before the text of the convention is laid on the Table?

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UNION

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Unionist

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

I think my horn, friend will find there are satisfactory dispositions with regard to that in the convention. Without having the actual text of the convention before me, I should not care to give a definite answer to my hon. friend, but I shall be glad to see that a 3

copy of the convention is sent to him personally as he is interested in the subject.

I have imposed myself to some extent upon the patience of the House in giving these details as to what our work has been during a period of somewhat less than four months. It seems to me important tjiat the House and the country should know us precisely as po.ssdible what has been done. I have only enumerated these matters; I have not elaborated them, at all. Fuller and more detailed information will be given later in the session. This is intended only as a brief resume, but I think it will convince hon. gentlemen and the people of the country as well that during their period of office the Government has not been idle. And I have not by any means spoken of every problem that has engaged the attention of the Government during that time. There has been the question of railway rates and railway taxation. There is the question of railway nationalization. There are many other questions.

With respect to the financial and commercial stability of the country, the House may be interested to know that the importations for. eleven months ending 28th February amounted to $875,266,149; that the exports during the same period were $1,482,450,816; that the total foreign trade of the country during those eleven months was therefore $2,357,716,965, and that there was a favourable trade balance of $607,184,667. The exportation of our foods this year will depend upon the crops. I have spoken of the difficulty connected with the provision of finance, and hon. gentlemen will realize that in a moment. Suppose, as seems likely, that we 'shall have' this year an exportation to Great Britain of $800,000,000 in excess of our importations from that country. Provision must be made for payment. Those supplies are vitally necessary for the use of Great Britain and the Allied nations.

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L LIB

Charles Murphy

Laurier Liberal

Mr. MURPHY:

Thiat would be 'an excels?

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UNION

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Unionist

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

Yes. That is

supposed to ;be a reasonable estimate, although it is only .an estimate, as my hon. friend will understand. It is based upon the experience of the past two years. It is equally important to our people that provision should be made to pay for their productions. I hope hon. gentlemen will realize that the financial problems thus presented for the consideration of the Government are of no .mean order.

I have already alluded to the fact that the Government proposes to introduce a Bill at the present session for the purpose of extending the franchise to women. A

notice of that Bill is already on the Order Paper, and we intend to proceed with it as soon as possible.

With respect to our part in this war,

I again repeat that the Canadian Force in the battle line to-day is numerically as strong as ever it has been. The military .authorities inform me that I ought not to disclose even to this House the actual number of men who are to-day fighting in the Canadian ranks. We have not only the fighting unit at the front which, since the close of the last session, has notably distinguished itself at Basschen-daele, where it accomplished precisely what it undertook, and where, in the face of enormous difficulties which required the most thorough preparation and organization to overcome them, it exhibited the greatest resourcefulness and heroism-we have not only that fighting unit at the front which has brought honour and renown to this country from first to last; but we have other almost equally important corps, the railway construction corps, the forestry corps, and the men in the flying service. We have paid a great price for what has been accomplished, and it is with a very sorrowful pride, I confess, that one can reflect upon what the Canadians have achieved in this war and upon the price which they have paid. The casualties are as followws:

Killed 25,744

Died of wounds 8,612

Died of disease 1,901

Total - [DOT][DOT] .. 36,257

Wounded [DOT][DOT] [DOT][DOT] 105,250

Prisoners of war 2,757

Presumed dead 3,845

Missing 937

Total casualties 149,046

Sir SAM HUGHEfy If that statement goes out without giving the number of returned men .people will get the idea that we have lost that number, whereas a great many of these men have returned to duty, I believe.

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UNION

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Unionist

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

My bon. friend is quite right. A great many of those who were wounded have returned to the front. I was not speaking in the sense, which, as he fears, might 'be attributed 'to the figures, but I was giving an enumeration of the total nunfber of wounded, and I aim grateful to my hon. friend for his suggestion.

I have 'spoken of the force at the front as being numerically not less strong than ever it was before. I know that it is quite as efficient, as determined and as confident as ever it was, -and that is saying a good deal. The temporary breakdown in the _ eastern

theatre of war has not 'discouraged our men one whit. We toad- great expectations as to wlhat might have (been 'accomplished in the eastern theatre during the past year. Those expectations have been diisappointed, but, on (the other hand, we have had thrown into the scale the enormous power and resources and the wonderful spirit and invincible determination of the United States of America, our nearest neighbour and Ally. That, I am confident, will much more than compensate. Besides that., let no one absolutely despair of what Russia imay do in the future.

Some hon. MCEMBERS: Hear, hear.

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UNION

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Unionist

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

One might liken Russia to a giant, manacled for a long time, Whose manacles have been, suddenly stricken off; he has not yet gained control of his laimibs, and endeavours to struggle to his feet. He bruises himself, and, perhaps, overturns those who would like to help him, but eventually he does gain his feet. I am confident that Russia will eventually gain her feet and again take her part as a great nation in. the 'affairs of the world. Let us remember that these people have been denied liberty for centuries, and so they may be pardoned for not knowing, in the first instance, what they should do with their new found freedom. During the past three or four years I have met on various occasions a very intelligent young man from Russia. He oaime (before he knew how to speak English to the United States of America, where he is now employed. I have talked to him of Russia from time to time. He is, perhaps, .from thirty to .thirty-five years of age. He told me that his father and mother were serfs in their youth, that his fathef had had his clothing stripped from hie back, and the knout applied until the .blood ran, for some trivial offence. There Was no remedy or redress in the law for that man because he was a serf, and in very truth .a slave. When new-found liberty comes to suich a people, can you be surprised if for the moment they do not Know what to do with it? I venture to believe and earnestly to hope that Russia will find herself in the early future, and will never become permanently .subject to the economic or other domination of Germany or of the Central Powers.

Now I have nearly done, and I must apologize to hon. gentlemen for trespassing so long on their patience. Our own course in this war is entirely clear. Germany's war aims have been absolutely unmasked, since the successes which have come to her in the Eastern theatre oif war. When

war was first declared, we heard her ruthless statement as to why she had undertaken it. It was openly confessed that it was a war of aggression, that it was undertaken as a national and profitable business enterprise, and that Germany would achieve her ends. Later on, the tune was somewhat changed, but in these later days the old tone of domination has been resumed, and we know that Germany does indeed seek to dominate the world. We are far removed from the theatre of war, and perhaps we do not quite adequately realize what the issue of this war means to us. I said to some gentlemen who came to speak to me a few days ago about some fiscal question, " Production of food in Canada is more vital to you than any other matter that is of concern to you at the present time. Upon the production of food in this country may depend the issue of this war, and upon the issue of this war depends the question whether you shall not come under such an economic domination .as would render your industries of little value to you, if not absolutely valueless and worthless." Perhaps we in Canada, far removed as we are from the scene of active operations, do not quite comprehend at all times how closely the issue of this war does concern us. Notwithstanding 'any disappointments that have met us in the Eastern theatre, I am as profoundly convinced as ever that the Allied cause must triumph, for in it is involved the future of the whole world, the future of civilization, of liberty and democracy. There is much talk of peace in these days.

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UNION
UNION

Robert Laird Borden (Prime Minister; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Unionist

Sir ROBERT BORDEN:

But I should consider all our sacrifice in vain if we did not achieve such a peace as would assure the world against intolerable and ruthless aggression in the future. May I not quote once more the well-known words of the great American, President Lincoln. '' Wo accepted this war for an object, a worthy object, and the war will end when that object is attained. Under God, I hope it never will end until that time." That I believe to be the feeling of the people of Canada from Atlantic to Pacific-

So in the face of disappointments, however severe, let there be no faint hearts amiong us>. Among our men at, the front *there is absolutely no doubt as to the issue. Among them one encounters a spirit of determination and confidence 3}

which may well serve as an example to us. Like them, let us look ahead and not behind us. Let us confront the issue with steady resolve. Let us undertake our duty and carry on our work in the same spirit and with the same unselfish devotion as our heroic countrymen who hold Canada s battle-line beyond the Atlantic.

At six o'clock, the House took recess.

After Recess.

The House resumed at eight o'clock.

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L LIB

Charles Murphy

Laurier Liberal

Hon. CHARLES MURPHY (Russell):

Mr. Speaker, in the last Parliament it was my privilege to congratulate you, Sir, when you were first chosen to fill the position of Speaker of this House. To-night it is again my privilege to offer you my felicitations on having been selected for a second time to preside over the deliberations of this assembly, and in doing so I feel that I may avail myself of the opportunity to say that you can at all times count upon the hearty co-operation of my fellow-members on both sides of this House to assist you in the discharge of the important duties attaching to you high office.

By way of expediting the business of the House, and in order to facilitate the work of the Government in pressing forward Canada's part in the war, I have a suggestion to make, whieh, if adopted, will, 1 am convinced, attain both those ends. My suggestion is that the hour for the meeting of Parliament should be changed, and that! instead of assembling at three o'clock in the afternoon, this House should meet at one o'clock, and sit continuously until six o'clock, or later, if necessary, and that night sessions should become the exception rather than the rule.

I have given this suggestion a good deal of thought, and I have discussed it with others who have had fairly extended experience in the work of Parliament. Their belief coincides with my own, that if the suggested change were made the members of Parliament would bring to the consideration of public business a capacity, both mental and physical, for sustained work that, under our present procedure, grows increasingly less as the session advances and night sittings multiply. The public business itself would be more expeditiously and more satisfactorily disposed of, the members of the Government would have more time to devote to the work of their respective departments, and those who, either in an official capacity, or as members of the press gallery, are obliged to report the daily proceedings of

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Some hon. MEMBERS:

Hear, hear.

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L LIB

Charles Murphy

Laurier Liberal

Hon. Mr. MURPHY:

Now, Sir, so that there may be no doubt as to my position, let me say at once that I have no quarrel with those who in the late election supported the Government in the honest belief that conscription wias the only way to secure reinforcements for the troops at the front; in the honest belief that conscription would be promptly, uniformly, and honestly enforced if the Government were returned to power, and that 100,000 men to relieve the men in the trenches would be sent to the front as soon as the Government was installed in office. To induce such beliefs the most lavish promises were made on behalf of the Unionist candidates, and as I have said, with those who believed in such promises and who supported the Govern-

-MARCH 19, 1918

ment on account of them, I have no quarrel. But the number of such persons is very small when compared with the total number who supported the Government for other and very different reasons.

Now, let me mention in general terms what those other reasons were- Briefly they were that Union Government would isolate Quebec and prevent the French and the Catholics from ruling Ontario and the rest of Canada; that the Pope and the Catholics generally were not in favour of the Allies in the present war; and, finally, that the issue was one between Protestantism and Catholicism, and that all who did not support the Government, as representing Protestantism, were slackers, traitors, and pro-Germans.

The campaign leading up to the open attack on Quebec and the French, as well as upon the Pope and the Catholics, with all of whom Sir Wilfrid Laurier and the Liberal party were'constantly bracketed, was widespread, thoroughly organized and lavishly financed. Within the compass of a speech, it is not possible to deal with all the ramifications of the conspiracy, and I must therefore confine myself to a few only of its many outcroppings.

Those who were members of the last Parliament know to what an extent the ranks of the Liberal party were honeycombed by Tace and religious appeals and I need not dwell on that aspect of the conspiracy against the Liberal party and its leader. While that conspiracy was in progress wtthiin this House, there appeared in the Parliamentary press gallery a new correspondent, evidently a stranger. In reply to inquiries I was informed that the stranger was the representative of the Christian Science Monitor of Boston. Upon expressing surprise that a religious paper like the Christian Science Monitor would go to the trouble and expense of sending a representative to Ottawa to report parliamentary proceedings I was further informed that the intention was to launch an anti-Catholic campaign that would fit in with the Government's preparation for the approaching general election. Of the correctness of that statement, proof was soon furnished by the appearance in the Christian Science Monitor of anti-Catholic, anti-French, and anti-Laiurier articles, which later were reproduced by the Ottawa Citizen, the Toronto dailies, and other newspapers that were all smitten about the same time with a severe attack of a disease which, for lack of a generic term, and with apologies to medical nomenclature, I may describe as

" Papalphobia." Following uiis outbreak, certain gentlemen closely identified with the Christian Science Monitor visited Ottawa and after a council of war with their Ottawa friends, were introduced, I am informed, to the right hon. the Prime Minister. What took place at that interview is immaterial, but what followed the interview is of very decided public importance. Early in October, 1917, a written memorandum issued from the office of the Prime Minister to the other members of the Cabinet, urging them to subscribe fox the Christian Science Monitor for their respective departments. The reason given for exercising this particular kind of war econo my^

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Some hon. MEMBERS:

Oh, oh.

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L LIB

Charles Murphy

Laurier Liberal

Hon. Mr. MURPHY:

-was that "the

Christian Science Monitor frequently has very useful and interesting articles respecting Canadian affaire," and that it was " being subscribed for in the Privy Council office." The only articles on Canada that the Monitor was publishing at the time were anti-Catholic tirades, and these the Prime Minister, in the words of his office memorandum, found " very useful and interesting." There is, therefore, no room for doubt as to where the Prime Minister stood in. the matter.

No v, Sir, I have heard of people being bribed with their own money but this is the first and only time I have heard of people furnishing money to finance attacks upon themselves, as the Catholics of Canada undoubtedly did when the Prime Minister had the Christian Science Monitor placed on the subscription list of the several depa-tments to he paid for out of public funds-funds contributed by Catholics equally with members of all other denominations.

But it must not for a moment be thought that the Christian Science Monitor en'oyed any monopoly in its chosen field. Quite the contrary. The English press of Canada, with a few honourable exceptions, joined in the hue and cry, and the Pope, Quebec, the Catholics and Laurier were the texts of their daily assaults. Nor was the campaign confined to the Tory press; it extended also to their Unionist confreres. The Toronto Globe was as mendacious as the Toronto Mail and Empire. The Toronto Star was quite as shameless as the Toronto News. And while the madness was at its height I am told that casual visitors to the Globe office, who were regarded as receptive to the new propaganda, were taken into the business manager's room, and there with

doors closed and a nervous watch on the windows, and in bated breath, Mr. J. F. Mackay would expatiate on the machinations of the Pope and the necessity of defeating them by defeating Laurier If the visitor did not appear to be sufficiently impressed, he was passed on to Mr. J. E. Atkinson of the Star, who would then exercise his slimy arts to complete what the less adroit Mr. Mackay had begun. And so the game was played throughout the land.

All this, Sir, was bad enough, but the turning of the churches into political cockpits was the crowning infamy of the whole campaign. Their pulpits were thrown open to laymen as well to clergymen; and in some cases were occupied by individuals more competent to expound the doctrines of the Sodomites than to preach the gospel of the Prince of Peace. And why was all this done? Merely to arouse the rest of the country against Quebec and the Catholics for the sake of winning the election. Mr. Speaker, was there ever such a defilement of the House of God in any other land under the sun? I know of none, and for the sake of Christianity itself I hope there has been none.

Lest the women voters were not as highly inflamed as their male relatives, special appeals to their fears and passions and prejudices -were made on the eve of the election. Perhaps the most inflammatory of these appeals, as it certainly wa.s the most grotesquely false, was published by the Canadian ' Home Journal in its December issue. After moralizing on the tragic importance of the issue to be decided on December 17, it proceeded thus:

Germany's reptile diplomacy uses many agencies in many lands, and the most important agency that it is to-day using on Canadian soil is the Roman Catholic Church.

No proof of this outrageous statement is offered, or attempted to be offered, but it is followed by these equally brilliant gems:

Lamentable as the fact is it is nevertheless a fact to be faced. As a consequence we find Roman Catholic Churches in Canada head centres of activity to place in power those whose policies aim at the withdrawal of Canada from the war, the desertion of our soldiers at the front and the betrayal of Great Britain.

And listen to this Mr. Speaker:

By what promises and devices the Kaiser's Government has secured the support of the Roman Catholic Church is not wholly clear.

Not then and not now.

He has promised to restore the Temporal home of the Pope in Europe and if victorious to' extend his influence to South America.

It is altogether probable that he has promised his aid in extending the powers the Church now enjoys in the province of Quebec to all Canada.

The women of Canada are religious by nature. They are the backbone of our Churches. Let them remember what is at stake.

Sir Wilfrid Laurier and his candidates exalt the traitor and contemn the soldier. It is for the womenfolk of the soldier to give them their answer at the polls.

Canada is menaced by open foes in Europe and insidious foes at home. To vote for Union Government is the woman's paramount duty,- the duty of the hour.

Mr. Speaker, could anything be more dastardly or criminal than the article from which I have just quoted?

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Some hon. MEMBERS:

Hear, hear.

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L LIB

Charles Murphy

Laurier Liberal

Mr. MURPHY:

And yet the writer of

that article not only goes unpunished but I have no doubt he enjoys many a chuckle over his contribution to the devil's brew with which the Union Governmen filled, and maddened and misled a too-credulous public.

So that no doubt may remain in the mind of any honest man or woman as to the issue upon [DOT]which the Union Government sought and obtained office, let me quote from a full front page article which appeared in the Orange Sentinel of December 20th, 1917, under the caption, ''Sound the Loud Timbrel":

A crushing defeat for the Roman Catholic Hierarchy of Quebec and their allies in the other provinces is the result of the polling on Monday.

The whole election campaign was fought upon the lines of the programme of the Orange Association. For the first time in the life of the dominion a union Protestantism followed the lead of the Orangemen of Canada to a magnificent victory over reactionary forces whose triumph would have disgraced the country. The great Order which the Sentinel represents has reason for gratification in having at last won that recognition from the Loyalists of the country which it has long deserved.

There you have a declaration after the event written by a gentleman who was endorsed by the Prime Minister as his candidate in West Toronto, and who now represents that constituency in this House. The Prime Minister has not in any way challenged or repudiated that declaration. As he endorsed the candidature of the man who wrote it, he' will be held to have endorsed the declaration as well, and the pulblic will judge him accordingly.

In view of the facts that I have presented, what becomes of the hollow pretense that the Government's election appeal was solely for the purpose of obtaining re-inforcements for the boys at the

front, and to maintain Canada's part in the war? The article in the Orange Sentinel, with the Prime Minister's endorsement, supplies t'he answer to that question.

I have illustrated the attitude of the Unionist party towards the Catholics of Canada for daring to oppose them. Let me now show you that a Catholic who supported them met with no better or different treatment. Reading again from the article in the Orange Sentinel of December 20th, 1917. I quote the following:

It is unfortunate that throughout the Englishspeaking province, the one element which stood solidly behind the Laurier party is composed of men who belong to the Roman Catholic Church. That was the backbone of the Laurier organization in Ontario. Apart from Bishop Fallon none of the higher Clergy of this province gave any indication of friendship for the Unionist Government.

There is every reason to believe, however, that his motive in supporting Union Government was largely a desire to punish those who have pursued him for twenty-five years.

Therefore his action cannot be taken as an indication of the sentiment either of his brother Bishops or of the faithful among their flock.

It would be 'a thousand pities, Mr. Speaker, to spoil by any .superfluous comment such warm-hearted appreciation by a leader of Unionism o>f the (help proffered by His Lordship of London to the Unionist party. I will .therefore merely repeat my previous observation that the article w-as written by the Prime Minister's personally endorsed candidate, and the Prime Minister's approving silence for three months shows that he also endorses the article itself.

As it is my desire to place on. record foir the information not only of Canadians [DOT] of to-day, but of Canadians of tlhe future as well, all the data requisite for an understanding of the Union Government and the character of its election campaign., I realize that my task would Ibe only half done, so far as Ontario was concerned, if I did not give the bon. member for Dunham (Mr. Rowell) full credit for his share in the attacks made on the leader of the Liberal party and on the Catholics of .this country. To fully appreciate that bon. gentleman's contribution it will be necessary to go back a few years to get the proper setting for .a correct view of hie .more recent performances.

Let me premise, Sir, by -staying that there was a time when, through lack oif .information, I regarded 'tlhe horn, member for Durham as an unselfish servant of 'the public. To-day, in the light o,f information supplied from a hundred sources, I desire to make reparation to .those whom I laboured to convert to my mistaken opinion by exposing,

as briefly as .possible, the facts relating to the hon. gentleman'-s public career as I now know them. Desiring .at the same time to be fair to the hon. gentleman, I propose to take as the standard of judgment that ought to be applied in his ease a standard that has been supplied by himself. Let me explain where that standard is to be found.

Speaking at North Bay on the 6th December last, the hon. gentleman arraigned the leader of the Liberal party and the people of Quebec for their alleged .attitude towards the war, and for the moment I do not intend to make any further use of his speech than to cite the basis on which he laid his charge. I will return to the speech later on. The basis of his charge on the occasion to which I Tefer was the lack of 'sacrifice on the part of the people of Quebec. A man who will make such ia change as that .should stand on very firm ground with regard to has own record in the matter of sacrifice, and if he does not so stand then it were better 'for him to have remained silent. Now let us see whiat the hon. gentleman's record is with regard to sacrifice.

Briefly stated, Sir, it is this: that while he preaches the gospel of sacrifice for others, he has consistently garnered and pocketed the fruits of selfishness for himself. As you are doubtless aware, Sir, the cult of commercialized Christianity, in Ontario at least, has been placed on the basis of an exact science. The three great exponents of that cult are John Wesley Allison, Joseph Wesley Flavelle and Newton Wesley Rowell. Ego is their god, autos their creed and moi-meme tlheir practice. In point of fact, Sir, they are the three great Canadian Sinn Feiners. In our political annals an infamous immortality was conferred on John Wesley Allison by my friend the present Minister of Public Works (Mr. Oarvell) in connection with fuses and shells- A like service was performed for Joseph Wesley Flavelle by Food Commissioner O'Connor and Mr. George W. Kyte, late member for Richmond, N.S., in connection with bacon and eggs. And, Sir, it is my purpose to convince you and the country that Newton Wesley Rowell is well worthy of the place the public has assigned him as the third member of that delectable trinity.

Not to go further back than the days of the Ross Government in Ontario, it may be recalled that the hon. gentleman was very active in his support of that administration, but his support entailed no sacrifice; quite the reverse. Through it he managed to secure an appointment as solicitor

have been sent to me. But the records themselves I will preserve so that they* may be available for future historical reference. It is to be kept in mind that the figures which I am about to submit relate only to French subjects who were members of religious orders in Canada. I will begin With the Franciscans. At the outbreak of war practically the entire body of French Franciscans left Canada and returned to France to do their duty. In the whole Dominion of Canada, I am informed, there now remain but six French Franciscan priests, and that these six are exempt from military service on the ground of age or physical unfitness. Those who returned to France were assigned to various war duties, and 32 of them went into the trenches. Of these three have been mentioned in the Orders of the Day, two have been decorated with the Military Medal, one has received the CToss of the Legion of Honour, one has been wounded and discharged, and one was killed on the field of battle, after he had been twice mentioned in the Orders of the Day, and had received the military medal.

From "L'lnstitut des Freres de l'lnstrue-tion Chretienne" twenty-five members returned to France and entered the French army. Of those, four have been decorated and mentioned in the Orders of the Day, four have been wounded, one was taken prisoner, one who was twice wounded, has been missing for three years, and is assumed to have died of his wounds; and two- were killed on the field of battle.

In addition to the Canadian members of the Jesuit order who are chaplains in France, five French Jesuits went back from Canada to join the French army. Of these two were killed in action.

All the members of the Congregation of the Holy Cross who were French subjects answered the call to the colours. One was wounded twice, and returned again to the front. One has been reported "missing" for over a year, and is assumed to be dead or a prisoner, and three others are still fighting in the trenches.

The Fathers of the Congregation of the Holy Ghost sent three of their members to the French Army, and a fourth is on his way to France. One of those who returned to France was killed at the front, and another who is now seriously wounded has been decorated with the Military Gross, and was twice mentioned in the Orders of the Day.

The Trappists had only two French members of military age and both returned

[Mr. Murphy.J

to France in 1914. One of them, Father Thomas, received two decorations, the Military Cross and the Military Medal, was twice mentioned in the Orders of the Day, and later, in rescuing a companion, suffered the loss of both eyes. To-day he is a teacher of the blind in France. The other Trappist who returned to his native country, was Father Hypolite, who is now fighting with seven of his brothers in the French army.

Of the 900 members of the Marist Order who have fought in the trenches, 14 French subjects went from Canada to France. Two of those were killed on the battlefield, six were wounded, one received the Military Medal, and all were mentioned fin the Orders of the Day.

Les Peres de Montfort sent 15 of their French members back to France. Three of these brave men were stationed in the county which I have the honour to represent in Parliament. Of the 15 who returned to France, five won the Military Cross, five were mentioned in the Orders of the Day, one of them on three consecutive occasions; and one was killed on the field of battle.

From the Eudist Congregation, 17 of its members went back from Canada to France. Of these, three were wounded, two were mentioned in the Orders of the Day, two were decorated with the Military Cross, and four were honourably discharged from service.

The Brothers of St. Gabriel sent eight of their French members who were of military age, to serve in the French ranks. Four of them were wounded, four were decorated with the Military Medal, four were mentioned in the Orders of the Day, and one of them, Bro. Garrigues-Antonin, is the inventor of a wonderful field gun which has done great execution against the enemy.

The twelve French subjects who were members of the Sulpician Order went to France when war broke out, and immediately reported foT duty. Seven went to France and later on served in the Lorraine, Verdun, Champagne and Saloniki campaigns. One of them was decorated with the Military Cross at Verdun.

With the Dominicans at Ste. Hyacinthe there were only two French members of military age when war was declared. These two went to France.

The Order of St. Sacrament sent to France the only one of its members who was not exempt on account of age or ill-health, and he is still serving as a chaplain at the front.

Four French members of the Order of the Holy Cross in Canada reported for duty at the beginning of the war, and one of them was wounded while fighting with the French army.

The Brothers of St. Vincent de Paul had only one French member eligible for military service. He joined the French army in 1914, and has been twice mentioned for bravery in the Orders of the Day.

The Missionaries of the Sacred Heart have been represented at the front by four French subjects who returned from Canada to serve in the trenches. One of them, Father Cadoux, was mentioned in the Orders of the Day for special bravery in rescuing the wounded under fire.

From the Capuchin Order, ten French subjects went back to France and joined the colours. Three of those men were killed on the battlefield, Father Albert, Father Edward and Father Justinian, all of whom at one time were stationed in Ottawa, and with two of whom I was well acquainted.

The Christian Brothers, at Montreal, are represented at the front by two of their French members, one of whom has been severely wounded.

From the Oblate Order in Canada, twenty-four French members returned to France, and they have served in the ranks with great distinction. One was killed on the battlefield, two died of wounds, four were decorated with the Military Cross, and several of the others were mentioned for bravery in the Orders of the Day.

Mr. Speaker, the figures which I have just placed before you, constitute a part only of what stands to the credit of the French Religious who went, back from Canada to France to help their Motherland in this war. But, Sir, I submit that these figures are more than sufficient to refute the baseless statements made by the hon. gentleman from Durham at North Bay.

If the hon. gentleman's statements were not made foT a wicked and malicious purpose, then by every .standard of public .and private honour he is required to retract what he has said, to offer an apology to the living and to make reparation to the memory of the dead. Should he hesitate or decline to do this, then he will stand selfcondemned before his fellowmen, stripped of the last vestige of any claim to public respect or public confidence.

You will recall, Sir, that earlier in my remarks I referred to the part the Christian Science Monitor had played in the Canadian campaign against the . Pope and the Catholics. If you are a reader of the New York press, you will be familiar with another phase of the same campaign which was carried on in the neighbouring republic. Among other things, the Christian Science Monitor and its imitators in the United States, as well as in Canada, alleged that the Pope was responsible not only for the disaster that befel the Italian army, but also for the disruptive propaganda that brought that disaster about. This amazing fiction was repeated apparently in good faith by F. C. Walcott, Assistant Food Controller of the United States. When convinced of his error, Mr. Walcott had the manliness to sign and authorize the publication of the following retraction:

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH.
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY.
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March 19, 1918