September 17, 1917

CON

William Thoburn

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. THOBURN:

It was not my intention to go into the merits of this case until the Bill was in committee, but after hearing the statements of the ihon. member for North Perth (Mr. Morphy), I feel it my duty to this House to give them some information. Having had the privilege of. healing the evidence, seeing the petitioner and the respondent, and ib'earing the matter thoroughly threshed out in the Private Bills Committee, I could come to no other

conclusion than that the petitioner was entitled to a Bill of divorce, To put the case as briefly as possible, this couple were married and lived together, penhaps not under the happiest conditions, for ten years. At the end of ten years they separated. The point I wanted to make was that the father and the mother of the respondent had lived in their home for a certain length of time. When the mother heard that they had separated, she went to the home to take care of it. That led me to believe that the petitioner could not be the had man that the hon. member for North Perth tries to make him out. The respondent herself admits, according to the evidence, that there was a time when she threw a plate of hot porridge over his head.

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CON
CON

William Thoburn

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. THOBURN:

There was another time when she could not get into the house as quickly as she wished, and sihe took her umbrella and smashed the window. These incidents would not lead you to believe that she was as good-tempered as the hon. member would have us suppose.

The whole question hinges upon the respondent resorting to a house which was proven beyond doubt to be a house of ill-fame. No one could come to any otheT conclusion after reading that evidence than that it was a house of ill-fame.

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CON
CON

William Thoburn

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. THOBURN:

I think it ill becomes learned members of this House, members of the Bar, to throw slurs upon the actions of the detectives of this country. But I am going to eliminate the evidence of the detectives altogether. And then what do you find? Two merchants, one living in the same building that this woman, occupied, and another right opposite, what is their evidence? That it was a house of ill-fame.. What was the evidence of the plainclothes detective, not paid by Mr. Gordon himself, not paid by anybody that I know of? The evidence of the detective was that it was a house of ill-fame. I say that this has been established beyond a doubt. The evidence has not been denied by the respondent that she frequented that house on several occasions in the middle of the night and remained there an hour and a half or two hours and a half. Will the hon. member for North Perth tell me

Mr. MORPHY; A dressmaking shop.

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CON

William Thoburn

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. THOBURN:

Dressmaking? A woman going to a house with another man in the

middle of the night under the guise of going to a dressmaking establishment? I am astonished at a man of the standing of the hon. member for North Perth trying to make hon. members, .swallow such gush as that.

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?

An hon. MEMBER:

He meant night

dresses.

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CON

William Thoburn

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. THOBURN:

It might have been

night dresses. That is acknowledged by the respondent. Take the other occasion when they went to this house, the insurance building. What do they go to the insurance building in the middle of the night, in the middle of the month of I bruary for? An umbrella! In that building, behind locked doors according to the evidence- will you tell me what a man and a woman were doing in that building in the middle of the night, behind locked doors, looking for an umbrella? Consult the meteorological records for that month and you will find that on the very night they were there for the umbrella it was several degrees below zero. It is not necessary for me to go any further. Everything I have said is borne out by the evidence as printed, and if time would permit I would quote evidence to supp 'rt every statement I have made.

Motion agreed to and House went into committee on the Bill, Mr. Rainville in the Chair.

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LIB
CON

William Humphrey Bennett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. W. H. BENNETT:

I second the

motion.

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CON
LIB

George Perry Graham

Liberal

Mr. GRAHAM:

No discussion on the

motion that the committee rise.

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CON

Joseph Hormisdas Rainville (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Conservative (1867-1942)

The CHAIRMAN:

The motion is not

debatable.

Motion agreed to on division, yeas 18, nays 15.

The committee accordingly rose without reporting.

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ARMY AND NAVY VETERANS' INCORPORATION.

THIRD READING OP BILL. '


The House in committee on Bill 131 (from the Senate,) to incorporate the Army and Navy Veterans in Canada, Mr. Rainville in the Chair.


CON

George Henry Bradbury

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BRADBURY:

The Bill before the House is one applied for by the Army and Navy Veterans of Canada. This is one of the oldest organizations in Canada, having

been formed in Winnipeg a short time after the Fenian Raid. After the Northwest Rebellion an amalgamation was made, and they called themselves the Army and Navy Veterans. Since this war started they have rendered very efficient services. They have recruited, through their organization, over 5,GOO men-over five battalions. Three years ago they secured a provincial charter in Manitoba. There are branches of this organization all over Canada. They are asking now for a Dominion charter. They have done splendid work. The Bill has been examined very thoroughly in the Senate and before the House of Commons Committee. [DOT]

Topic:   ARMY AND NAVY VETERANS' INCORPORATION.
Subtopic:   THIRD READING OP BILL. '
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LIB

Frank Oliver

Liberal

Mr. OLIVER:

Are there any special

powers or provisions in the Bill?

Topic:   ARMY AND NAVY VETERANS' INCORPORATION.
Subtopic:   THIRD READING OP BILL. '
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CON

George Henry Bradbury

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BRADBURY:

I do not think so. The incorporators are: Major-General John

Hughes, Major-General Henry N. Ruttan, Captain Sir Hugh John Macdonald, Lieutenant-Colonel Sir Daniel Hunter McMillan, Judge David Marr Walker, Lieutenants -Colonel George Frederick Carruthers, ,T. Hilliard Leech, K.C., Major George F. R. Harris, Judge George Patterson, Lieutenant William Allen Shepard, and a number of others. The objects of the Bill are: To unite fraternally all . persons who have served as soldiers or sailors under the British flag, and are entitled to become members under the constitution and bylaws of the association, into a body of retired soldier and sailor veterans of a nonpartisan and non-sectarian character, for purposes of good-fellowship, mutual improvement and assistance, and patriotic endeavour and service to the Empire;

To increase the public influence of veterans by organization, by parades and by giving as an entity expressions of opinion upon public questions affecting the rights of veterans or concerning the welfare of the whole or any part of the Empire;

To stimulate the spirit of patriotism in Canada and to promote, on sound and enduring principles of equality of rights, a Greater Britain, by a closer unity and coordination of the Overseas Dominions with the Mother Country;

To assist the Empire when occasion requires in enlisting recruits for His Majesty's forces;

To acquire, maintain and operate clubs, homes, and meeting places for the benefit of veterans, and to furnish, stock and equip the same with such furniture, furnishings, plant, animals, implements, equipment appliances, libraries, and means of entertain-374

inent and amusement, as may by the association be considered desirable.

Topic:   ARMY AND NAVY VETERANS' INCORPORATION.
Subtopic:   THIRD READING OP BILL. '
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LIB

Edward Mortimer Macdonald

Liberal

Mr. MACDONALD:

Practically all the

incorporators reside in Winnipeg. What relation has this proposed) incorporation to the association of veterans of the present war being formed in portions of the Dominion east of Winnipeg?

Topic:   ARMY AND NAVY VETERANS' INCORPORATION.
Subtopic:   THIRD READING OP BILL. '
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September 17, 1917